20 Most Recent Nikon D60 Digital Camera - Page 5 Questions & Answers


This is not something you can do....you need to send the lens to a service center for a professional cleaning.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 19, 2013


the flash pivot on the release side of the flash has a small cylinder that operates the flash up switch. If that cylinder is broken off or the pivot is pushed in so the switch doesn't close, then what you describe happens

pop up the flash and remove the two screws underneath, and you can pry off the cover - gently - to check the switch

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 18, 2013


You should try some photo recovery software to rescue the files on your camera memory card, here are some you may rely on. Both programs can also recover videos and music.

Photo Recovery Software (for Windows)
Mac Photo Recovery Software (for Mac OS X)

Be careful: Before your pictures are recovered, do not attempt to save more files to the memory card in case the original files(your pictures) are overwritten.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Feb 22, 2013


This is a hard one to answer as there can be all sorts of causes for this. Flexes can come out of their connectors. Flexes can be damaged. Depending upon where it hit, you could have shorted out the flash and blown the main circuit. What you need to do is carefully remove the bottom and back covers (careful - the back cover is connected to the main circuit by a flex!!!) and check the flexes and make sure they are seated properly. Then check the boards for impact damage. For more than this you should probably seek professional help, as there are boards in the front, top, and side that contain 300 volts for the flash and you can get a nasty shock if you do not discharge the flash capacitor using a 100 ohm 5 watt resister tool

Nikon D60... | Answered on Feb 02, 2013


There is no fuse you can replace, the camera needs repairs.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jan 27, 2013


The D60 works as SLRs have worked for half a century, providing a viewfinder through which you frame and compose your picture. The screen is for menus, settings, and reviewing pictures you've already taken. The LiveView feature which lets you use it as a point&shoot camera was introduced with the D300, introduced a year after the D60.

Sorry if that wasn't the answer you wanted to see, but that's the way this camera works.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Dec 15, 2012


The D60 works as SLRs have worked for half a century, providing a viewfinder through which you frame and compose your picture. The screen is for menus, settings, and reviewing pictures you've already taken. The LiveView feature which lets you use it as a point&shoot camera was introduced with the D300, introduced a year after the D60.

Sorry if that wasn't the answer you wanted to see, but that's the way this camera works.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Dec 15, 2012


Yes you can.
In bright sunlight using the LCD display may be difficult then you can use the view finder.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Dec 06, 2012


there is a button just to the left of the flash on the camera that should pop up the flash or if you are in auto mode it shoud pop up by itself.. if these do not work then your flash is stuck and you could just pull up in it and it should open but I dont recommend that just in case you break it.. but I have done that several times

Nikon D60... | Answered on Nov 15, 2012


To change the Info display format, follow the instructions in the "Info Display Format" section of the manual (page 120 in my copy). If you simply want to change the wallpaper image to one of your own, follow the instructions under "Wallpaper" (page 122 in my copy).

If you need a manual, you may download a copy from here.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


yep ...look in the menu ...of the camera ..and select the type of battery u are using ..there are 2 kinds of batteries ...one of them are alkaline ...and the other I'm not sure ..probably nickel or lithium ..or something like that ...anyway there are choices there ..and you just have to try 'am one by one ...
it will also accept only high quality non chargeable ones ...so ..even if they work in other device ..in this kinda cameras it will see 'em as empty if they arent great in quality and amperage ...

Nikon D60... | Answered on Sep 15, 2012


Have you tried using it in another device that reads/writes SD cards?
It's possible it is a counterfeit SD card. Some counterfeit cards don't work or are not the true capacity. If it it a name brand like SanDisk it will have a serial number. The counterfeit ones typically don't have serial numbers.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Sep 02, 2012


The lens is supposed to be locked at its smallest setting (largest f/number). You can control the aperture from the camera body, the same was as on a lens without an aperture ring. For example, in aperture priority mode (A), simply turn the command dial. In manual mode (M), hold down the exposure compensation button while turning the command dial.

That was for a lens with the electronics to communicate with the camera. If you have a purely mechanical lens, you must shoot in manual mode and control the aperture by turning the ring on the lens. There should be a small orange slide near the aperture ring, Slide it toward the front of the lens to unlock the ring.

If you need more help, please feel free to reply to this post. Please specify the lens when you do.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Sep 01, 2012


It sounds like the flashing lights of an airplane going across the sky.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012


Try the procedures in this tip.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Aug 29, 2012

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