20 Most Recent Nikon D60 Digital Camera - Page 3 Questions & Answers


The D-90 and D-60 are similar so this may work for you. On my D-90, you go to the menu, then click on the little pencil Icon. The top line will read: Reset Custom settings." Click on this line then click "yes" to reset all custom settings back to default. You can also reset individual settings back to default by clicking on the line for the specific setting you want to reset.

In addition, on the top right side of the camera you will find a "+/-" button and an "AF" button. Both are marked by little green dots. Press these two buttons simultaneously for several seconds and it will reset most of the custom settings back to default.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 27, 2014


The Nikon D-90 users manual says on page 256 that the ERR message indicates a camera malfunction and that it can be cleared by releasing the shutter.

I've found on my D-90 that the only way I can get the shutter to release is my turning the camera off. When I turn it back on the ERR message is gone and the camera functions as it should.

Occasionally, I have had to remove and reinstall the battery to make the camera turn off but this happens only rarely.

The users manual says if the condition occurs frequently or persists that you should contact a Nikon authorized repair center. I suggest that you contact Nikon tech support at www.nikon.com to see what they suggest. I think this information would apply to the D-60 as well.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 27, 2014


Based on what you said, it appears that you want to know how to turn the flash off on your D-60.

On my D-90, you do this by rotating the mode switch on the top center left side of the camera one click counterclockwise, from the green automatic setting, to the white automatic with no flash setting.

You can also change flash settings from the menu. For my D-90, the manual says you use custom setting "e2." Check your manual for the D-60.

I never turn my flash off from the menu because it takes too long to turn it back on when you need it. Another alternative is to simply hold the on-camera flash in the down position while you shoot.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 25, 2014


You should check custom menu setting 2, and make sure it's set to one of the auto modes. Make sure the lenses you are using are AF-S and not regular AF lenses. The D60 has no autofocus motor, so autofocus only works with AF-S lenses.

I always suggest folks take a look at Ken Rockwell's website also, here's a link to a specific page on autofocus on the D60.

Post a comment here if none of this works and I'll see what else we can do.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d60/af-settings.htm

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 24, 2014


To conserve battery power. Actually, it's only turning the LCD screen off, which is a huge battery hog. If you're out in the field waiting hours for that ___ to come by, you don't want you battery dead from running the LCD screen all the time, but you might miss the shot if you have to take the time to turn the camera on. So the camera "naps" until your subject is in view.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 20, 2014


Yes it is compatible with Nikon D60.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 20, 2014


ALTERNATE WAY TO TRANSFER PHOTOS TO COMPUTER
If your photos are stored on the memory card, then removethe memory card from the camera and insert it into an USB memory card reader.Connect this USB memory card reader and memory card into the USB port of yourworking computer. Your computer will see this as an USB Mass Storage Device oran external storage device; you can then open the folder on the memory card andcopy the photos to your computer.Memory card reader is a handy device and is inexpensive. Youcan copy photos from other cameras and you can also download photos off yourmemory card to someone else's computer without the need of installing anyprograms.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 20, 2014


hi there,

this case will happen if you still have pictures on memory card and it hasn`t been formatted using the Nikon system

the solution is backup your files on memory card to PC/laptop, then reformat the memory card using Nikon menu

hope this will help you

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 14, 2014


It would be useful to know which lens you are using. Have you tried aiming the AF area to a contrasty spot? If you aim at something which is not contrasty enough the AF cannot focus. It can also happen if it is too dark.
I would also try the lens on another body. A friend or the nearest shop may help there.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 03, 2014


You pushed the wrong button! On the left side of the LCD display, there are four buttons. One is labeled "ISO" and the other "QUAL". In the viewing mode, these buttons are used to allow you to scan multiple frames at one time. Each time you press the ISO button, it increases the number of images displayed. Each time you press the QUAL button it reduces the number of images displayed.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 01, 2014


upgrade firmware...... or maybe one or more pins are not in contact with the SD chip...... try also cleaning the gold parts of the SD with a pencil eraser

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 25, 2014


Look at your memory card. SD cards have a slide switch along one edge. The position farthest from the metal contacts locks the card, protecting it from writes. The position nearest the contacts unlocks the card.

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 08, 2014


One theory on this is that the camera's software or settings may somehow be corrupted, so you should go through the process of resetting the camera to its original factory settings. If that does not clear up the problem, try another AF lens and conform whether the problem is the lens or the camera body. If the camera is not focusing another lens, then you may need to clean the contacts or look for some sort of damage.

If it turns out that it is the lens, the best solution is to send it to Tamron for service and see what they can do about it.

If you cannot send it to Tamron, you ought to see whether it is something as simple as some sort of internal dust or dirt collection blocking the mechanical switches and functions of the lens.

Start with making sure that you have a fully charged battery for the camera or AC power adapter for the camera. You do not want any of the problems with the camera to be related to having too little voltage available.

Make sure that the camera's power switch is switched off. You do not need to have the battery or adapter connected just yet.

Next, with the lens off of the camera, switch back and forth several times, firmly, between AF and MF and switch the vibration compensation off and on a few times. Of course, do not drop the lens. Also, unless you need the zoom ring locked, you may want to make sure that the zoom ring lock is fully off. While you are doing this, or after switching back and forth, check the electrical contacts on the lens and the camera body. If anything looks even a little less than shiny, clean the contacts.

With the camera's power still switched off, put the lens back on the camera.

Either put the battery in the camera or connect the AC adapter.

Set the lens to AF with vibration compensation off.

Switch the camera's power on.

Try getting the camera to automatically focus on something. If it works, turn the camera's power off, then switch vibration compensation on, then turn the camera's power on and try again. It may be fixed, at this point, which means that you can ignore the rest. Otherwise:

Turn the camera's power off again and switch to manual focus. Turn the camera's power back on and rotate the lens's focus ring (gently) all of the way through the focal range two or three times. Try taking one or two pictures, just to be sure that everything is working in manual. Turn the camera's power off and switch the vibration compensation, then turn the camera's power back on. Gently rotate the focus ring all of the way through the focal range two or three time, and then take two or three pictures to verify that everything is still working in manual.

After that, turn the camera's power off and switch back to AF with vibration compensation off. Turn the camera's power back on. Try to get the camera to automatically focus on something. If it works, then turn the camera's power off and switch vibration compensation back on again. The turn the camera's power on and try to get it to automatically focus on something.

If all of this works, than you should be okay with it as it is. You may still want to send the lens in to Tamron to get it serviced, in case the problem was some sort of lint or dirt getting caught up in the gears or servo that moves the lens through the focal range.

If it does not work, you could try to force the lens to re-engage the autofocus servo. It will probably void your warranty, if you still have one, so you are better off send it in to Tamron for service, first, before trying it. Also, as the manual and common sense would indicate, if you try to force the lens to adjust its focus ring while it is switched to AF, you could easily break the mechanism in the lens.

With that being said, some people claim that they got their lenses to return to proper autofocus by leaving the lens switched to AF and trying to rotate the focus ring manually. One person says not to "force" it, his just took a "firm push". I have not tried this, so I do not have advice on how much force may work or how much will damage the plastic bearings, gears and teeth inside the lens.

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 05, 2014


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo management program such as Picasa ( http://picasa.google.com ).

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 20, 2014

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