20 Most Recent Nikon D60 Digital Camera - Page 8 Questions & Answers


Have you tryed connecting the camera to the PC with a USB cable? This might help you access the SD card and hopefully allow you to copy the files.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 21, 2011


error shutter press release button again

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 08, 2011


No tools required! It simply snaps out. Open the battery door so it's at 90 degrees to the body and unsnap the pins where it pivots in the body. If you look closely, you'll see there is enough clearance for the pivot pins to snap out of its holders.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Jun 05, 2011


When the shooting information display is shown, press the [i] button (the bottom one on the left) to switch to the quick settings display. Use the cursor pad to select the shooting mode (fifth item from the top along the right edge) and press OK. Use the cursor pad to select one of the two release modes. The quick response remote mode (marked with an icon of the remote control) fires the shutter when you press the button on the remote. The delayed remote mode (marked with the remote icon and "2s" gives you two seconds to hide the remote behind your back before firing the shutter.

Full details are "Releasing the Shutter" section of the manual (starting on page 54 in my copy).

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 20, 2011


You must lock the aperture ring to f/22, so the camera can engage the aperture adjustment lever on the lens. Then, you can change the aperture with the command wheel.

When you change the aperture with the command wheel the aperture ring on the lens doesn't move when the camera actually adjusts the lens aperture.

Take the lens off and locate the aperture adjustment lever on the lens mount.

Unfortunately, this won't work with older AF lenses. So if you are using an older lens, the only thing you can do is change the camera setting to M (Manual) to adjust the aperture on the lens yourself.

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 16, 2011


A good solution is from the main overview screen, press the button in the very bottom left-hand corner. From there, you can manually adjust the exposure of all pictures taken. Try turning it down until the pictures look normal. Another thing to try is to lower the ISO, which can also be controlled from the same menu, or from the settings in the camera. The max is 1600, with the lowest being 100.

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 11, 2011


Repeatedly press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your photos until you find one you like.

Nikon D60... | Answered on May 09, 2011


Using the Camera

* 1 Attach the USB cable to the camera. Open the small, rubber door on the side of the camera body and plug the corresponding end of the USB cable into the slot on the camera.

* 2 Plug the USB end of the cable into the computer. Make sure the cable is securely attached to both the camera and the computer.

* 3 Turn the camera on. This will open software to download your images. You will be able to move the images from the camera to the computer and choose whether to remove the images from the card.

* 4 Select the option to download or transfer images. This will depend on what type of operating system you are running and may vary if you are running third-party image processing software, such as software that came with your camera.


Using a Card Reader

* 1 Turn the camera off and remove the memory card carefully.
* 2 Insert the card securely into the card reader slot.
* 3 If necessary, turn on the card reader. This will open the software to remove images from the card and place them onto your computer.
* 4 Select the option to download or transfer your images.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 30, 2011


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 26, 2011


Hi,

You should review your camera manual. Here's a link to it.

First, the "Auto ISO" message is simply informing you that the ISO value (which is the sensitivity to light - the same as film ISO values. The lower the number the less sensitive and longer the exposure needs to be. High ISO values are more sensitive and require less time - but become grainier as the value increases) is not set to any particular value, but will adjust up and down as needed. ISO is mentioned throughout the manual, but begins on page 53.

The "r09" message is letting you know that the internal memory buffer has enough room for 9 images to be taken in rapid succession - before the camera must stop shooting to transfer those images from the buffer to the removable memory card. If you held the shutter release button in continuous shooting mode, the "r09" would decrease by one after each exposure until after "r01" was taken. then the camera would not shoot until the buffer was transferred. page 55 of the manual details this indicator.

It is important to note that neither of these conditions is an error message. Also, neither would prevent taking a picture. What can prevent an exposure is an out of focus condition. The focus is set to either Manual Focus or Auto Focus in the quick settings display and on many Nikon lenses made for use with digital cameras attached directly to the camera. Page 61 of the manual describes this in greater detail. Make sure that the the camera settings are not conflicting with the settings on the lens (if equipped with the M-A or M/A-M switch like the one shown below).

steve_con_52.jpg

If you set the camera and lens to manual focus, you can release the shutter at any time - regardless if the subject is in focus or not. If in Auto mode, there needs to be sufficient light for the camera to focus. If the lens does not attempt to focus, the focus motor could be having a problem. The D60 does not have a focus motor in the camera body like most of the other Nikon cameras, and must use lenses with focus motors built into the lens instead. Use of a lens that does not have a motor will have to be focused manually. Only AF-S and AF-I designated lenses can auto focus with the D60 camera body as indicated on the bottom of page 18. Compatible lenses are listed on page 181.

I hope this helps and good luck. Please rate my reply . Thanks!

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 25, 2011


You'll need at least a small screwdriver and a soldering iron. If you feel up to it, you can order the part and do it yourself.

The part depends on which variant of the 18-5mm lens you have.

18-55 3.5-5.6 G ED DX
http://uscamera.com/1c999-357.htm

AF- S 18-55 3.5-5.6 G II ED DX:
http://uscamera.com/1c999-488.htm

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 25, 2011


Having received no response in over two months, I assume my suggestion to use a card reader solved the problem.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 21, 2011


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Nikon Transfer or any other photo cataloging program.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Apr 19, 2011


hi dear queen studio, youur D60 have the secuence motor damaged and need to be replaced the ( SQ base plate unit).Contact a Nikonservice station to do.
Regards

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 28, 2011


Having gone over four months without a response, I assume my suggestion to use a card reader solved the problem.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 26, 2011


If you could see the picture on the screen before taking it, there was something seriously wrong with your D60, which apparently now seems to have fixed itself. The D60 doesn't have the LiveView feature which allows you to use the screen instead of the viewfinder to compose your picture.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 26, 2011


Hi dear kellicouture, your d60 need the replacement of SQ base plate unit the secuency motor is damaged.
Regards

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 19, 2011


You're going to have to do a "wet" cleaning. If you google the words "cleaning a DSLR sensor", you will find sites explaining the procedure and where you can obtain the supplies. It may sound daunting, but once you do it, you will see how easy it really is and be able to do it whenever you need to in the future.

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 16, 2011


Hello dear Sir Ed Rudzinsky,your D60 need replacement of SQ unit base plate ,for that you should bring it to Nikon service.
Regards

Nikon D60... | Answered on Mar 10, 2011

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