Question about 1994 Chevrolet K1500

2 Answers

What could cause oil in antifreeze but no coolant in oil other than the engine oil cooler in the radiator?

Is there any history of engine oil coolers leaking oil into radiator? Is there any history of intake gaskets able to transfer oil to antifreeze without antifreeze getting into the oil? Is there any history of head gasket failure causing oil in antifreeze but not coolant into oil.

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  • Master
  • 847 Answers

Hi most proberly head gasket,but check that no object has gone through the fins of the rad and oil cooler,hope this was some help.

Posted on Mar 07, 2018

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  • Chevrolet Master
  • 5,274 Answers

Generally, Which system had the most pressure when the leak occurred? If the oil system had the most pressure, at that time, then it makes sense that you could get oil in the cooling system with no antifreeze in the oil. Or vise-versa.
There may be other variables? Just my 2 cents.

Posted on Mar 07, 2018

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

jingB

jay b

  • 19 Answers

SOURCE: Coolant leaking into the engine oil. I'm guessing

Hi there, your in the right track about your guesses, better start small. Start with the oil cooler. I not very familiar with the monte carlo but if it has 2 coolant hoses one for input and the other one is output. Change your oil , then remove the two hoses from the oil cooler and plug-off the hoses temporarily( I use a rounded wood). You must secure the hoses to avoid leaking or bursting that why I use wood to plug the hoses(tight fit) then secure them with hose clamps. Next is to start the engine and wait until it warms up and let it run for a while. Well if find no coolant in your oil then surely your oil cooler is at fault. 

But then again, I don't know the leak rate of your coolant in your engine. If you tried removing the radiator cap and run the car a while and theres no coolant leaking then we are talking about a small fissure, but if your coolant still leaks in then its a big crack.

Hope this helps.

Posted on Sep 29, 2009

agent91

Ned White

  • 2100 Answers

SOURCE: Radiator fluid getting into oil

You might not notice a change in performance for a while, but the head gasket is blown and the water seeps down there at night or when it is cool. It won't do it when it is running because it gets burnt. Check your exhaust for steam, and get a compression check done, it will tell which cylinder is blown. I just had a car blow on me, ran fine for many miles, would eat coolant though. I never let it overheat, but then one day, kaboom, all done, wouldn't run again. The hole in the gasket was smaller than these letters I'm typing, and the one cylinder that blew was squeaky clean, from the steam. Hope this helps.

Posted on Oct 11, 2010

MNfisherman

Nate Stansfield

  • 11896 Answers

SOURCE: Recently, I have replaced the radiator water pump

Cracked head or bad headgasket

Posted on Nov 10, 2010

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3 Answers

I have a slight amount of oil in my radiator, I had this years ago and my dealer fixed it and said it was something small. Anyone know what it maybe or had the same experience. Thanks


This is a concern that requires immediate attention. Oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil is an indication that the integrity of the engine has been compromised and a passage has developed between the oil and coolant.

Installed in some radiators is a transmission coil cooler that is connected usually at the bottom of the radiator by two metal tubes. A failure internally of the radiator could breach the separation.

Head gaskets that have coolant pass through openings can also be a failure allowing the liquids to mix.

Look for coolant in the engine oil.
Check for oil level overfull

Look for steam from exhaust

Hope this helps.

Have repair done ASAP at qualified shop
Water in oil
26313575-w3itrvjrcoc1z5s35x2k3yfd-1-0.jpg
Oil in water
26313575-w3itrvjrcoc1z5s35x2k3yfd-1-2.jpeg
Head Gasket Failure
26313575-w3itrvjrcoc1z5s35x2k3yfd-1-5.jpg

Oct 16, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

What's the likely cause for an oilcooler to mix


The passages that the oil runs through inside the oil cooler have likely become corroded and are allowing oil out/coolant in. This has been an ongoing issue with vehicles using extended life antifreeze, particularly Dexcool. The antifreeze becomes corrosive and rapidly wears components that it passes through, i.e. radiator, heater core, oil cooler, etc.

Apr 16, 2012 | 2007 Opel Corsa 1.8

2 Answers

Hi my gmc envoy 05 i check the radaitor i see that have an oil.so what is the problem we have a leak?


There has been a problem with the Dex cool orange antifreeze deteriorating the upper and lower intake manifold gaskets, causing coolant to leak in to engine.If there is antifreeze in your oil, it will ruin your engine. If you find antifreeze in the oil it will cause the oil to become thick and frothy and will not lubricate the bearings and other moving parts, causing an engine failure. If there is evidence of coolant in the oil, do not drive the vehicle. Have it towed to a repair shop and have the gaskets replaced, oil and filter changed, cooling system flushed and refilled with GREEN antifreeze that is compatible with aluminum radiators and engine parts.

Dec 29, 2010 | 2000 GMC Envoy

3 Answers

The coolant jug has a creamy tan color fluid in it


that means trans fluid or engine oil is getting into cooant system. Not good. Either a leaky trans cooler in the radiator or a blown head gasket. Hope it's the trans cooler

Dec 08, 2010 | 1999 Volkswagen Beetle

1 Answer

How do you replace the radiator in a 1997 Ford Escort?


Check this procedure to REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
(1.8L and 1.9L Engines)

CAUTION Never open, service or drain the radiator or cooling system when hot; serious burns can occur from the steam and hot coolant. Also, when draining engine coolant, keep in mind that cats and dogs are attracted to ethylene glycol antifreeze and could drink any that is left in an uncovered container or in puddles on the ground. This will prove fatal in sufficient quantities. Always drain coolant into a sealable container. Coolant should be reused unless it is contaminated or is several years old.
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Place fender covers on the aprons.
  3. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Drain the cooling system.
  4. Remove the right and left-hand front splash shields.
  5. Disconnect the lower radiator hose from the radiator.
  6. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, disconnect the lower oil cooler line from the radiator. Remove the oil cooler line brackets from the bottom of the radiator.
  7. Lower the vehicle.
  8. If equipped with an automatic transaxle and air conditioning, remove the seal located between the radiator and the fan shroud.
  9. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, remove the upper oil cooler line from the radiator.
  10. If equipped with the 1.8L engine, remove the resonance duct from the radiator mounts.
  11. Unplug the cooling fan motor electrical connector and the cooling fan thermoswitch electrical connector.
  12. If necessary, remove the cooling fan thermoswitch for clearance.
  13. Remove the three fan shroud attaching bolts and remove the shroud assembly by pulling it straight up.
  14. On some 1.9L engines equipped with A/C, remove the upper radiator air deflector from the radiator and set it aside.
  15. Remove the upper radiator hose and the two upper radiator mounts.
  16. If equipped, remove the fluid cooler tube bracket bolts and coolant overflow hose from the radiator.
  17. Remove the radiator from the engine compartment by lifting it straight up.


2.0L Engine
(1997 MODELS)
  1. Remove the fan motor, blade and shroud assembly.
  2. Raise the car and support it with safety stands.
  3. Unfasten the left-hand splash shield bolts and remove the shield.
CAUTION Never open, service or drain the radiator or cooling system when hot; serious burns can occur from the steam and hot coolant. Also, when draining engine coolant, keep in mind that cats and dogs are attracted to ethylene glycol antifreeze and could drink any that is left in an uncovered container or in puddles on the ground. This will prove fatal in sufficient quantities. Always drain coolant into a sealable container. Coolant should be reused unless it is contaminated or is several years old.
  1. Drain the cooling system into a suitable container.
  2. Disconnect the lower radiator hose and if equipped with an automatic transaxle, the lower oil cooler outlet tube.
  3. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, Unfasten the oil cooler tube bracket bolts.
  4. Lower the car and disconnect the upper radiator hose.
  5. Remove the radiator cap and disconnect the radiator overflow hose.
  6. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, disconnect the upper oil cooler outlet tube.
  7. Unfasten the four radiator bracket bolts and remove the radiator from the engine compartment.
To install:
  1. Install the radiator and tighten the bracket bolts.
  2. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, connect the upper oil cooler outlet tube.
  3. Install the radiator cap and connect the radiator overflow hose.
  4. Connect the upper radiator hose, then raise the car and support it with safety stands.
  5. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, tighten the oil cooler tube bracket bolts.
  6. Connect the lower radiator hose and if equipped with an automatic transaxle, the lower oil cooler outlet tube.
  7. Fill the cooling system with the specified amount and mixture of coolant.
  8. Install the splash shield and tighten the bolts.
  9. Lower the car and install the shroud, blade and fan motor assembly.
  10. Start the car and check for coolant leaks.

Hope helps (remember to rate this asnwer).

Nov 11, 2010 | 1997 Ford Escort

1 Answer

Transmission fluid level need regular top up and there is no external leak.Fluid color looks white.


If no external leak and the transmission fluid colour looks white, the problem belongs to the automatic gearbox oil cooler. The oil cooler has broke mixing the gearbox oil and coolant causing this milkshake. It's a small radiator core type oil / water heat exchanger. It is cracked inside and transmission oil is mixed with engine coolant. Because the transmission oil pressure is greater than engine coolant pressure, the transmission fluid level drops. See also the coolant colour inside recovery coolant reservoir inder bonnet! It could be like this:

9d86426.jpg

The automatic gearbox oil cooler type oil / water heat exchanger (oil cooler):

138b4e6.jpg
(In the picture above the transmission oil pan was removed for oil filter replacement).

Oct 29, 2010 | 2005 Audi A4

4 Answers

There is oil in the radiator


could becoming from ur oil cooler lines that go into rad,,,could have internal crack in rad,,,pull dip stick out & ck to see if motor oil is low or a grayish color,,if ok ck trans fluid to see if is low,,have to find out what kind of oil residua is in the over flow jug

May 08, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet Astro

5 Answers

I have a 2003 saturn l300 with a v6. I found Oil in the coolant. What could cause this?


ok this is to everyone that has a saturn l3oo. i am currently working on one i have the whole top of the motor apart and the oil cooler has a crack in the tube. u need to get a new cooler or have someone make one for u so u dont have to go to a dealer for a cooler..hope this helps

Jul 25, 2009 | Saturn L300 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Overheating and change engine oil ... oil was changed one week ?


it seems like the radiator of your car needs attention. check for coolant level in it, when its cold. if les add some coolant and then see if the problem persists.
--than there are chances of chocking in the coolant pipes, may be they not reached to engine..  
--Check the chock,, that it is not turned on. 
--May be sum loosing nut in engine.

Nov 29, 2008 | 1997 Cadillac Seville

12 Answers

OIL IN ANTIFREEZE


Everyone automatically assumes that oil and water mixing means a blown head gasket or cracked engine block. Of course common sense is usually not that common. Oil in coolant is a different problem than coolant in oil. The former is a low pressure leak, and could indicate only an intake manifold gasket. It could also be an early or small head gasket leak. Coolant in oil is usually a cracked block or torn head gasket, and has concomitant symptoms of white exhaust smoke and milky oil on dipstick. If you replace the head gasket and the problem persists, an intake gasket could have fixed the problem.

Jun 27, 2008 | 1999 Saturn SL

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