20 Most Recent Onkyo TX-SV454 Receiver Questions & Answers


i believe protect mode is because you have the wrong impedence speakers, they are too low (4 ohm? 6 ohm?) it chols work with 8 ohm speakers

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Jun 26, 2019


Nothing should be connected to PHONO except a turntable.

Reverse the leads left-to-right and see where that takes you for the root. Might be a bad cable.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Dec 16, 2014


the shorted spkr wires probably fried the putput transistors in that channel.  Do you know how to use a Fluke  test meter on diode test

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Oct 09, 2012


Generally speaking, an amp attempts to protect itself from heat, shorts, overloads and operator exuberance by refusing to turn on or stay on.

Overloads can be from excessive periods of high output or marginally low impedance loading by the speakers; and shorts would be wiring issues or a speaker blowing up.

You should be able to feel if it's hot. WHY is it overheating? Make sure it has sufficient ventilation on all sides and that vent holes are not blocked by dust balls. Ensure the fan (if equipped) is running as designed (some only operate on demand). Clean dust and debris from it.

If the amp comes back on after cooling, you're lucky. They only have so many self-protection cycles in their lives so continuously resetting or cycling their power without addressing the cause can do more harm than good.

If it protects immediately on a cool power up you should disconnect the speaker connections and try it 'naked'. If it comes up then diagnose which lead(s) are shorted. If it does not come up the problem is internal and should be left to an experienced and competent hands-on tech.

Check for loose speaker connections at the speaker as another possible root cause for intermittent shutdown.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Jul 31, 2011


This means that you have a problem with the speaker outputs.
-Try turning the unit off and unplugging it.
-Disconnect all of your speakers.
-Plug it back in and turn it on.
If it works, check you speakers and wiring for shorts.

If it still shows protect then you probably have a blow output amplifier and it will need repair.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Mar 15, 2011


I don't think you can fix it, unless you're skilled with electronics. Possibility that something has occurred internally with a circuit board etc so the system shuts down in order to protect itself from catching on fire etc. Get it services. Might not be too bad of an issue, but certainly not a bypass.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Mar 02, 2011


I bought a new ford electric car.
I am trying to install my Sony XYZ stereo in it but it doesn't hook up.
What do I do?


Ok, now we've isolated the problem in the structure of your question.
Without knowing a single thing about WHAT samsung LED tv you have, nobody can really help you.
Please be much more specific about the TV and how everything is hooked up and what it's hooked up to.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Feb 22, 2011


I can't find an image of the rear panel but I have a low-rez manual for the TX-SV434, which should be pretty close. I can't make out the labeling on the RCA connections.

Let's simplify this. The CD just goes into the CD input.

You can either use the two (if present) Tape or Video In/Out loops for the individual processors, or you can run them in series with each other on one Tape Loop.

I don't imagine you really want to use both Dynaic Range processors together, so each one's Bypass function would take it out of the path if so desired.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.
[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Aug 09, 2010


You need to replace the internal fuse.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on May 25, 2009


I was able to solve this problem by using the "A" speaker jacks and eventually I pushed the right buttons to get the Surround mode to turn ON. I believe it was when I hit the Parameter Selection button that allowed the surround mode to become active.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Jan 19, 2009


Sounds like you have a front end problem. Sorry my freind, there is no quick fix for this unit. your going to need some pretty expensive equipment to trouble shoot the RF section of this reciver. It most likly will exceed the cost or close to the cost of the unit to have a pro fix it as well. What you can dom if you really like the unit is to go out and purchace an inexpesive unit or tuner and use a tape out of the new unit to an empty input of your olkd unit, so then you will be able to use the new one to tune in the FM again with your old amp.

Onkyo TX-SV454... | Answered on Sep 22, 2006

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