Question about Haynes VW Jetta, Rabbit, GTI and Golf Repair Manual covering New Jetta 2005, Jetta 2006-2011, GLI 2006-2009, Rabbit 2006-2009, GTI with 2.0L engine 2006, GTI 2007-2011, and Golf 2010-2011. Does not include 2005 Jetta based on the A4 platform or 2006 1.8L GT

1 Answer

I have no spark and no injector in2010 vw gol

I replaced crank sensor inspected all the fuses and I replaced pcm power relay.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,620 Answers

Look for a broken power feed going to the ECM.

Posted on Feb 03, 2015

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Put new fuel pump in 2010 chevy express 3/4 ton van have no power to fuse its grounded on both sides only one power to fuel pump relay


I don't know liter size of engine? The relay has two sides, the load side and the control side. The load side, looks like open switch, left side. Terminal 87 is hot all the time. The right side of relay is control side, needs voltage and ground. On the control side, dark green wire with white tracer is voltage, comes from pcm. The black wire is chassis ground.
Are you missing anything else? Engine cranking, you have spark at the plugs where applicable, and fuel injector pulse? With engine cranking, if your missing everything, I'd have to check rpm signal.
fuel pump relay-ghcoodekmg2zyxdq5iv4j4is-3-0.jpg

Jul 07, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

1999 ford expedition 4.6L cranks but will not start


you might try starting fluid in air horn to see if it tries to run, then at least you would know it is not an ignition problem and only on the fuel side. Maybe wiring connector to crank sensor is bad. Really not sure how you would check if Anti-theft is preventing starting, but keys are only 1/2 of system and PCM is the other.

Apr 02, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Wont start. it has injector pulse but no spark


is there power and ground to the coils?

If there is injector pulse than the crank sensor has to be good. Injector pulse and spark are both calculated off from the signal from the crank sensor.

Checking for power and ground to the coils is a good place to start. If that checks out than either there is a wiring issue in between the PCM and the coils or possible the PCM has failed.

I’m happy to assist further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/jeremy_d728a59f986299fa

Nov 20, 2015 | 2001 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am

1 Answer

Hard starting


This problem can be hard to track down , it could be caused by several thing's ! A bad check valve in the fuel pump letting fuel drain back into the tank , not keeping fuel line pressure up , a crankshaft position sensor can also cause this as well as an ignition control module !
Checks
Action
DEFINITION: Engine cranks OK, but does not start for a long time. Does eventually run, or may start but immediately dies.
Preliminary
?€¢
Refer to Important Preliminary Checks Before Starting in Symptoms - Engine Controls .


?€¢
Inspect the powertrain control module (PCM) grounds for being clean, tight, and in the proper locations. Refer to Engine Controls Schematics .


?€¢
Search for bulletins.

Sensor/System
?€¢
Test the engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor for being shifted in value. Connect a scan tool. Compare the engine coolant temperature against the intake air temperature (IAT) on a cold engine. The ECT and IAT sensor values should be within ?± 3?°C (5?°F) of each other. If the ECT sensor is out of range with the IAT sensor, check the resistance of the ECT sensor. Refer to Temperature Versus Resistance for resistance specifications. Replace the ECT sensor if the resistance is not within the specification. If the sensor is within the specification, repair the ECT signal circuit for high resistance.


?€¢
Inspect the mass air flow (MAF) sensor installation. A MAF sensor that is incorrectly installed may cause a hard start. Important: The embossed arrows on the MAF sensor indicate the direction of the intake air flow. The arrows must point toward the engine. Install the MAF in the proper direction. Refer to Mass Airflow Sensor/Intake Air Temperature Sensor Replacement .


?€¢
Inspect the camshaft position (CMP) sensor for proper mounting and/or a bad connection. A long crank time occurs if the PCM does not receive a CMP signal.

Fuel System
?€¢
Inspect the fuel pump relay operation. The fuel pump should turn ON for 2 seconds when you turn ON the ignition. Refer to Fuel Pump Electrical Circuit Diagnosis .


?€¢
A faulty in-tank fuel pump check valve allows the fuel in the lines to drain back to the tank after the engine stops. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect both injector fuses for being open. An open injector fuse causes four injectors and four ignition coils not to operate. Replace the fuse. Inspect the injector circuits and the ignition coil circuits for an intermittent short to ground.


?€¢
Inspect for incorrect fuel pressure. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect for a restricted fuel filter. Refer to Fuel System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Inspect for a contaminated fuel condition. Refer to Alcohol/Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .


Ignition System
?€¢
Test both injector fuses for being open. An open injector fuse causes four ignition coils and four injectors not to operate. Replace the fuse. Inspect the ignition coil circuits and the injector circuits for an intermittent short to ground.


?€¢
Inspect for proper ignition voltage output with J 26792 Spark Tester. Refer to Electronic Ignition (EI) System Diagnosis .


?€¢
Remove the spark plugs and check for the following:


-
Correct heat range


-
Wet plugs


-
Cracks


-
Wear


-
Improper gap


-
Burned electrodes


-
Heavy deposits

Refer to Spark Plug Inspection in Engine Electrical.
?€¢
Determine the cause of the fouling before replacing the spark plugs if the spark plugs are gas, coolant, or oil fouled. Refer to DTC P0172 or P0175 for diagnosis of the rich condition. Refer to Spark Plug Inspection in Engine Electrical for diagnosis of coolant or oil fouled spark plugs.


?€¢
Inspect for bare or shorted ignition wires.


?€¢
Inspect for loose ignition coil grounds. Refer to Electronic Ignition (EI) System Diagnosis .

Jul 14, 2015 | 2002 GMC Sierra 1500

1 Answer

1997 neon will not start


Check the ASD relay in under hood fuse/ relay box. ASD stands for automatic shut down relay. Powers up pcm ,fuel injectors and ignition system an O2sensor heaters .crank over the car an check for power at O2sensor heater fuse in the underhood fuse box ,no power means bad relay !

Jan 18, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No spark to plugs 1999 ford f150 4.6l


https://s21.postimg.org/wwpncpluf/pcm_power_relay.jpg

Click on the link.
Voltage for fuse 18 comes from, pcm power relay.
Terminal 30, load side of relay is fuse protected and hot all the time. If you unplug that relay and use jumper wire between terminal 30 and 87, fuse 18 should go hot. That should mean, the control side of relay has a problem, The control side needs voltage and ground.

Jul 24, 2017 | 1999 Ford F150 Regular Cab

2 Answers

No spark ferom coil


Probable Causes: Fuel Pump (P0230 to P0233) PCM (P0600 to P0606) Crank Sensor (P0355 to P0399) Fuel Pressure (P0190 to P0194) Chances are the Check Engine Light is not on, but you may find any of the following codes: P0230 to P0233 Fuel Pump codes P0600 to P0606 PCM related codes P0335 to P0339 Crank Sensor codes P0190 to P0194 Fuel Pressure Sensor codes No spark due to a bad crank position sensor, a faulty ignition module or PCM, a problem in the ignition circuit (ignition switch, antitheft system, wiring, etc.), a faulty park/neutral safety switch, a bad ignition coil (only on engines with a single coil ignition), or wet plugs or plug wires (did it rain last night, did you just wash the engine?) A less common cause is a worn starter that draws so many amps while cranking the engine that there's not enough juice left to adequately power the ignition system and fuel injectors. Contributing factors might be a weak battery and/or loose or corroded battery cables. No fuel because of a dead fuel pump, bad fuel pump relay, blown fuel pump fuse, plugged fuel filter or line, or failed PCM injector driver circuit or injector power supply relay. Or, the fuel tank might be empty (don't believe what the gauge is telling you), or the fuel tank might contain contaminated fuel (water or too much alcohol) or the wrong type of fuel (whoops, somebody put in diesel instead of gasoline). No compression because the timing belt or chain is broken, the timing belt or chain is loose and jumped out of time, or the overhead camshaft has snapped.

Dec 20, 2013 | 2000 Hyundai Sonata

1 Answer

Ignition


Step 1 - Anytime you have a problem with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) inspect all fuses using a test light and check the under hood power distribution center and under dash fuse panels. If all fuses test okay continue to the next step.
Step 2 - To check for problems with electronically controlled components such as an engine, transmission, ABS brake, or SRS (supplemental restraint system, Air Bag) and the fuses test okay a trouble code scan is needed to identify any system trouble. Use a simple scanner tool to retrieve trouble codes and see if they relate to the specific problem, like a crank angle sensor failure code. If the trouble code present does not pertain to the immediate problem like an EVAP code ignore it until a later time, after the car is running.
The reason we repair non-related codes after the engine is running is because sometime false codes can be triggered by the engine not running. Once the engine is running again the code present might cycle and turn itself off. You might say "if the engine doesn't run shouldn't it have a trouble code?" Sometimes conditions occur that will not be detected by the computer, example: if the fuel pump fails the computer cannot detect the failure, so the engine doesn't start and the computer thinks everything is okay with no codes. If no trouble codes are present proceed to the next step.
Step 3 - The spark plugs in your engine are used to ignite the compressed fuel air mixture. If the condition of the spark plugs are fouled by excessive fuel or carbon the engine will not start, backfire or run rough. Remove all spark plugs to inspect their condition. Please use this spark plug condition reference guide to see how the spark plugs are operating.
Step 4 - Determine if the engine has compression, this can be done a number of ways but the most complete method is to perform a compression check. Remove the spark plugs and perform a compression test on one cylinder. If one cylinder has compression then the remaining cylinders usually will be close to the same. Crank the engine over about 5 seconds, normal compression readings should be between 125 psi and 160 psi on each cylinder. If no or little compression exists additional tests will be needed. The most common reason for an engine to lose compression is a timing belt or timing chain failure.
If low or no compression exists remove the oil fill cap and observe camshaft rotation when the engine is cranked over. If no rotation exists the timing belt or chain has failed. If your engine has a timing belt and you cannot see the camshaft easily remove the upper bolts to the timing cover and gain visual access to the belt, recheck cam rotation by cranking the engine over. Sometimes a timing belt or chain can jump causing the camshaft to lose correlation with the crankshaft and therefore causing low compression. The best test for this condition is to remove the timing belt/chain cover and inspect timing marks. If the compression is ok proceed to next step.
Step 5 - Test the ignition system output, ignition systems can vary in configuration but operate on the same principal. Ignition systems can consist of a coil, pick up coil, crank angle sensor, cam angle sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires, distributor cap, ignition rotor and a distributor and any variations of these components. An ignition coil is a voltage stepper coil that transforms a low voltage (12 volts) signal into tens of thousands of volts needed to jump the gap of the spark plug.
This coil is activated by an ignition module triggered by using the camshaft/crankshaft angle sensor; timing is adjusted by the PCM (computer).This primary electrical signal is generated by the PCM which calculates spark timing by using a variety of sensors including coolant temperature, mass air flow, and oxygen sensors. To perform a basic ignition output test you must have a test light and follow the ignition system output test video.
If the ignition system test is weak or non-existent test the car fuses, both under hood power distribution center and the fuse panel under dash. This test is performed with a test light tool. The test light should illuminate on both sides of the fuse, if not the fuse has failed and needs to be replaced. If the fuses are ok a manufacturer specific repair procedure is required and an online auto repair manual is needed to continue. If the ignition system tests ok proceed to the next step.
Step 6 - Test fuel system pressure, test for proper fuel pressure with a test gauge on the fuel rail or in line somewhere in the system, most throttle body injection cars (TBI) are between 13 psi and 17 psi. Most (DPI) direct port inject systems are between 40 psi and 55 psi. If good fuel pressure is present continue to next step. If no or little fuel pressure is present check the fuel pump fuse and fuel pump control relay located in the fuse panel, you can find this fuse and relay by checking your owner's manual, back of the fuse panel cover diagram, or an online auto repair manual, if the fuse or relay has failed replace it a new unit and re-test.
(Note: some Ford cars have an inertia switch designed to cut off the fuel pump in the event of an accident. Sometimes this switch can accidentally be triggered causing the engine to not start. If the car is exposed to a random bump either in the road or by another car this switch can be triggered. To check for this condition locate the inertia switch, if the cut off switch has been active it will have a white or red indicator at the top of the switch. Push this indicator down to disarm the cut off switch, if the indicator does not move down it is not activated and is not the problem.)
Have a helper crank over the engine while you place your fingers over the relay, does the relay click under your fingers? If so the relay could be working, there is a chance the relay has burned contacts inside causing the problem but we will get back to that. Next, access the fuel pump power feed wire, there are a few ways to do this, first you need a wiring schematic to find the color wire needed for testing, the best way to do this is with an online auto repair manual. Once you have found the color wire it should be located in the wiring harness near the fuel tank were the pump is located.
Ground the test light and probe (pierce the wire's outer coating with the test light point) the wire, have a helper crank the engine over. If the test light illuminates and you have no fuel pressure the fuel pump had failed and needs to be replaced. If the test light doesn't illuminate the fuel pump control relay has probably failed, replace it with a new unit and re-test, in most cases this relay is under thirty dollars. There is an outside chance the power feed to the relay has failed but it doesn't happen very often. If this is the case use an auto repair manual to trace the power source to the relay.
Step 7 - Test fuel injector pulse and supply voltage output (test is used for most cars). This test will tell you if the computer system has operating voltage and injector trigger signal. Remove an electrical connector from a fuel injector (it doesn't matter which injector) probe both sides of the connector with a grounded test light (there are only two terminals). Have a helper turn the key to the "on" position without cranking the engine and observe the test light. The test light should illuminate one side of the connector only.
Next, switch the test light lead to the positive side of the battery to test the system ground injector trigger, probe the side of the connector that did not light up, have a helper crank the engine over and observe the test light, it should blink on and off. If this test checks ok continue to next step. (Note: if no injector pulse is present try disconnecting the remainder of injectors and re-test, if a fuel injector is shorted it can shut down the injector driver causing no injector pulse. If injector pulse returns plug injectors electrical connectors in one at a time until the pulse fails and replace that injector)
If this test revealed that there was no pulse but system has power the PCM is not generating a fuel injector trigger. If there is no trigger to the fuel injector it will not allow fuel to enter into the engine. Some of the most popular reasons that can cause this condition include a shorted crankshaft angle sensor, shorted camshaft position sensor or shorted PCM. (When a system trouble code scan is performed it does not always catch a crankshaft angle sensor, camshaft position sensor failure).
Tip: try disconnecting all non-essential sensors, example: oxygen sensor, coolant sensor, throttle position sensor, air intake temperature sensor, mass air flow or map sensor and EGR valve pressure differential sensor. Crank the engine over, if the injector pulse returns, one of the sensors is shorted causing the system to not operate. Plug the sensors in one at a time until the injector pulse fails then replace that sensor and reassemble.
(Note: Some Ford cars have an EGR valve pressure differential sensor that when the catalytic converter becomes slightly plugged will melt the sensor causing the system to shut down. Inspect sensor for melting at the electrical connector then repair or replace as needed and recheck).
If the test reveals that the connector has no power on either side at any time the system power has been disrupted. Some of the most common reasons for this is condition are the main PCM fuse, main PCM power relay and main PCM power feed wire failure. (Some vehicle PCM feed wires are located near the battery and corrosion can stop the voltage feed). If all power sources check out the system ground needs to be checked, this is done by reversing the test light lead and installing it on the positive side of the battery.
Now the test light will illuminate when grounded. Use the test light to check main system grounds to the PCM, most system ground wires are black but to be sure you will need an online auto repair manual. If repairs have recently been made a system ground lead could have been left off of the engine causing the system not to power up, so double check all engine wiring harness grounds.
Step 8 - If the engine has compression, ignition and fuel injector pulse and the engine still doesn't run it could have a plugged exhaust system. Disconnect the exhaust system before the catalytic converter and crank over, if the engine starts the car has a plugged converter or exhaust system. Disassemble the exhaust system to inspect to replace the exhaust component that has failed and reassemble to recheck.

Jan 07, 2012 | Chevrolet Express Cargo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2001 Explorer Sport Trak and it don't want to start. We have checked all the sensors (crankshaft, cam trigger, fuel pump pressre is 65). What is the tank fuel pressure sensor voltage reading. ...


The first thing to check would be spark. This can be done by connecting a spark plug tester to a plug wire while the engine is cranking. The tester must be grounded to the engine block for a good electrical connection.. Your fuel pump pressure is OK.
The problem should be electrical so check
1. No voltage to the fuel injectors (blown injector fuse or bad relay)
2. No pulse signal to the injectors from the PCM (no crank or cam sensor input to the PCM, or a bad driver circuit in the PCM, or a wiring harness problem)
3. A shorted fuel injector (robs voltage from the other injectors so none will operate)

Jan 08, 2011 | 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

1 Answer

No start


Okay, lets start with fuses, check all your fuses, then move on to scanning the computer for any stored codes, like pcm codes as chrysler has had computer problems, and make sure power wire from battery to fuse/ relay box is good and clean, then check your auto shut down relay maybe swap with a known good one, then last dis connect all injectors and check for a shorted one.

Jul 12, 2010 | 1999 Dodge Caravan

Not finding what you are looking for?
Haynes VW Jetta, Rabbit, GTI and Golf Repair Manual covering New Jetta 2005, Jetta 2006-2011, GLI 2006-2009, Rabbit 2006-2009, GTI with 2.0L engine 2006, GTI 2007-2011, and Golf 2010-2011. Does not include 2005 Jetta based on the A4 platform or 2006 1.8L GT Logo

300 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Haynes Heating & Cooling Experts

Lawrence Oravetz

Level 3 Expert

10543 Answers

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

6082 Answers

Raymond Richards
Raymond Richards

Level 3 Expert

407 Answers

Are you a Haynes Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...