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Drying out wet drywall - Tools & Hardware - Others

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I'm assuming your talking about drywall that was wet during a flood of some type? Recommend you remove all damaged drywall and using a straight edge and a utility knife this can be easily accomplished. After you cut and remove the damage, remove all screws or nails from the studs giving a good surface for the new drywall that your going to replace the damaged stuff with. Get that done and we can move onto taping and drywall compound repairs. Hope this helps.

Posted on Apr 30, 2014

  • Brad Wang Dec 06, 2019

    You'll probably want professional help with this for the best results.

    Mt Rose Drywall Repair Reno
    620 Gordon Ave, Reno, NV 89509
    775-431-2330
    www.renodrywallrepair.com

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