20 Most Recent Canon PowerShot A560 Digital Camera - Page 8 Questions & Answers


Try NOT using the USB connection.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on May 01, 2011


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Windows Photo Gallery or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 22, 2011


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use iPhoto or any other photo cataloging program.

The card will usually come out of the reader when you pull on it. On some readers you may have to push it in a bit with a fingernail to make it pop out.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 22, 2011


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program, such as Picasa ( http://picasa.google.com ).

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 12, 2011


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Canon ZoomBrowser or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 10, 2011


To start your picture resize or shrink, simply click the "Browse..." (or "Choose File" for Mac and Safari Users) button above under "Step 1". After you have chosen your file, you can simply click the box that shows one of our predefined widths and continue on. Or, you can click "More Options" to click a height instead of a width, or specify your own custom resized height and width.

If the picture you are resizing supports a quality setting (usually only JPG or JPEG images support quality changes), you can click a lower quality in order to lower the final file size (in bytes), or just leave it at 100%.
Finally, click the "click here to resize" button. After your image is resized, you can save it to your computer using the form on the next page

Hope this one will work.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 08, 2011


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program, such as Picasa ( http://picasa.google.com ).

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 07, 2011


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Canon ZoomBrowser or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 03, 2011


You can download Canon software from
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/support/consumer/digital_cameras/powershot_a_series/powershot_a560#DriversAndSoftware

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Canon ZoomBrowser or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 02, 2011


Consider NOT plugging your camera into your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 01, 2011


I think this page offers a good answer.
It seems to have something to do with the number of photos on your memory card. You should probably consider removing some of the photos you may have already downloaded. You can also use a USB card reader to get direct access to the card.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 29, 2011


Hello

Thank you for using FIXYA!!!

This is a suggestion. If you do not feel comfortable trying it, you will need to take the unit to your nearest service centre. Feel free to let me know if you need any assistance.

The problem might be that the lens has become stuck in the barrel. There are some DIY solutions you could try, but the probability is that you will have to get it fixed by a professional.

Use these at own risk as it may further damage the camera.

Firstly , try connecting your ac adapter or usb cable.

Try holding the shutter button while switching on the camera.

Look at the lens , and if some of the lens 'circles' is misaligned or not concentric then try wiggling it (while holding camera lens down).

Try gently pushing or pulling the lens when it extends but this is risky as it may cause the lens barrel to slip out of its guidance system.

Another way to do this is to place the camera lens down on a hard surface and then power it up. Be sure to use a soft cloth or something similar as to not scratch your lens or casing. Let the lens push the camera up and down a few times and sometimes the little resistance provided by the camera is enough to get things going again.

Try hitting your camera near the lens on the body with the soft tissue on the palm of your hand.

Other than that , I would take the camera to a repair centre for a evaluation to see if it would cost more to repair than to replace the camera.

If it is still under warranty I would suggest you take it in before trying any of these steps and remove any off-brand batteries or accessories as some stores are really fussy about warranty repairs on camera's with non-brand accessories.

You can also have a look at THIS link.

Hope the advise is useful. please do not hesitate to let me know if you need any further assistance. Also, please be so kind to let me know if you found this helpful.

Regards
Andrea

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 16, 2011


The salt water is the big worry, if the photo's were on the removable memory card you might have a chance, if the photo's were on the internal memory "game over" I will assume the pictures are on the removable card, gets some rubbing alcohol and Q-Tips now carefully clean the contacts and the switch on the card. Salt is extremely corrosive when combined with water so keep in mind that this will be a long shot and time is a factor, "good luck"

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 14, 2011


SD cards have a slide switch along one edge. The position farthest from the contacts locks the card, protecting it from writes. The position nearest the contacts unlocks the card. If the switch is already in the proper position, slide it fully the other way and then back again.

If that doesn't work, try another card.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 14, 2011


Hello thanks for using Fixya
  • First, if this is just happening after purchasing a new card, AND your camera is an older camera, I'm going to guess that you bought a new 4GB or larger SDHC card. Although the SDHC card looks exactly the same as a standard SD card, the format the card uses is very different. Unfortunately your older camera was likely designed before the SDHC format came out. Sorry, but a SDHC card may not work with your older camera (check your camera maker's website). You probably will need to use standard SD cards only (usually those 2GB or less). But if you REALLY need to use a 4GB card, do a Google search for 4GB SD "non HC", with the non HC in quotes. Believe Transcend makes one. Also consider 4GB MMC cards which may also work for your particular model camera. But be prepared to pay premium price as these large capacity "non HC" cards are very scarce.
  • If you've had the card for a while, and it just recently started to show "memory card error", ask yourself if you can ever remember formatting your card IN THE CAMERA. If not, we may have discovered the problem. An unformatted card will initially work fine in a camera, but eventually will corrupt with time, especially after many files have been saved and deleted. A card can also corrupt if camera power is interrupted during the write process (such as changing batteries or batteries dying while the card is still writing the last picture taken). Formatting the card in the camera will correct both these problems, BUT it will also erase all photos on the card.format the card in your camera to prevent this from happening again (dig out your instruction manual to figure out how). Stating this once again, formatting will also totally erase your card, so only do this after you've recovered and saved to your computer any important photos from the card.
  • If the above items didn't fix the problem, I know that you probably already have checked the card's slide switch, but I just want to first present this for others with the same problem who may not know of this switch.Check to make sure that you didn't accidentally place the tiny locking slide switch on the side of your SD card in the "locked" downward position. The correct "unlocked" position should be slid up toward the direction of the connectors. If you discover that the locking switch is missing or has broken off, proceed directly below

angel_bird_2.jpg
  • If none of the above seems to work, or if you've found that you've broken the locking tab on the card, one final thing to try before opening the camera is good old tape. Cut a tiny piece of clear cellophane tape (use scissors to trim it), and place it tightly over the slot where the locking switch is, or was. I can't stress it enough, keep the piece of tape small, you don't want to jam your card in the camera. Now slide the card into the camera. If you encounter any resistance, STOP, the tape is likely too thick or too much. But if not, proceed and see if that corrects the problem.

angel_bird_3.jpg
If you've come this far and you're still getting a card error, it may be time to consider opening the camera to force open this switch, or to inspect its wiring (not recommended unless you have some familiarity with electronics). In this case contact service provider.

I hope this solution will helpful for you Your Rating As Four Thumbs which are given below to this solution will appreciate me

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 12, 2011


Hello and Welcomethe Canon A560's bottom panel is reasonably flat, with a sliding door to access the battery compartment and a threaded plastic tripod mount off in the opposite corner. The battery door and tripod mount are far enough away from each other to permit quick battery changes while working with most tripods To close the battery cover first Hold it and make it Flat and then by the tip of Your thumb Press it in inner side To demonstrate it the image is given below: angel_bird_0.jpg


Further assistance i am here to help
Please don't forget to click on Four thumbs which are given below if it is helpful
THANKS & Keep Using Fixya

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 09, 2011


Here is the suggestion:

The battery compartment cover and the design of the metal electrical contacts is flawed. These acontacts re made of springy metal, but there isn't enough force to press the metal securely against the battery. The end of each contact has a metal tab that prevents it from being bent further out to increase the tension. These contacts are the cause of the low-battery warning.

Some fixed the camera by inserting tiny pieces of plastic foam (i.e., spongy, like from "foam rubber" pillows) under the metal contacts. Used a small screwdriver to gently bend up each metal strip, and stuffed a small piece of foam under it. This provides enough force to keep the contact securely touching the battery.
or You can also try the "toothpick trick" as described in various forums, and it seems to be working. There is a belief that there is a design flaw with the battery compartment door, or the springs that press against the battery. By wedging a toothpick under the battery contacts, it seems to force the contacts into the battery, seemingly helping with the problem that many are facing in this and other forums.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 09, 2011


Here is the suggestion:

The battery compartment cover and the design of the metal electrical contacts is flawed. These acontacts re made of springy metal, but there isn't enough force to press the metal securely against the battery. The end of each contact has a metal tab that prevents it from being bent further out to increase the tension. These contacts are the cause of the low-battery warning.

Some fixed the camera by inserting tiny pieces of plastic foam (i.e., spongy, like from "foam rubber" pillows) under the metal contacts. Used a small screwdriver to gently bend up each metal strip, and stuffed a small piece of foam under it. This provides enough force to keep the contact securely touching the battery.
or You can also try the "toothpick trick" as described in various forums, and it seems to be working. There is a belief that there is a design flaw with the battery compartment door, or the springs that press against the battery. By wedging a toothpick under the battery contacts, it seems to force the contacts into the battery, seemingly helping with the problem that many are facing in this and other forums.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 09, 2011


Fixing a Lens Error on a Digital Camera


This has to be THE most common failure mode for a digital camera. Some common error messages that might show up on the LCD's of cameras with this problem include "E18 lens error", or "lens error, restart camera". Some cameras might show nothing at all, but merely make a beeping noise as the lens goes out, then in, then the camera shuts off. Sometimes the lens won't even move.

The problem is actually quite common throughout all camera brands. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. Or the battery ran down with the lens extended. Believe it or not, one BIG contributor to lens errors is using a camera case. Sand, gunk, case fibers, etc... accumulate at the bottom of the case. These materials love to cling to the camera by electrostatic build-up from the camera rubbing against the side of the case (especially those cases with soft fibrous interiors). Once these materials work their way into the lens mechanism, that's all she wrote. I have many cameras, and NEVER use a case for this very reason.

A camera owner that suffers this problem may have no recourse for having the camera repaired. Many camera makers will not honor repairing this problem under warranty as they claim it is due to impact damage to the camera, or sand or debris getting into the lens gearing mechanism (neither of which is covered under warranty). The quoted repair cost is usually close to or more than what the camera is actually worth.

Fortunately, about half the cameras that suffer this failure can easily be fixed by one of the following methods. None of these methods involve opening the camera, although some have potential to cause other damage to the camera if excessively done. If the camera is still under warranty, before trying any of these, please please first contact your camera's maker to see if they'll cover the repair, or to determine how much they'll charge for the repair. Who knows, you might get lucky. But if they quote you a number that's higher than the value of your camera, you may want to consider the following methods.

The methods are listed in the order of risk of damaging your camera. Thus make sure you try them in the listed order. And remember, these fixes (especially #6 and 7) should only be considered for a camera that's out of warranty, who's cost of repair would be excessive, and would otherwise be considered for disposal if unrepaired:

Fix #1: Remove the batteries from the camera, wait a few minutes. Put a fresh set of batteries back in (preferably rechargeable NiMH 2500mah or better) and turn the camera on. If that didn't work, try pressing and holding the Function or OK button while turning the camera on.

Fix #2: Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install new batteries, and turn on the camera. If you get an Error E30, it means you don't have a memory card installed, so turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.

Fix #3: Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particles that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying fixes 4, 5, and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.

Fix #4: Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.

Fix #5: Blow compressed air in the gaps around the lens barrels with the idea of blowing out any sand or grit that may be in there jamming the lens. Other variations include blowing with a hair dryer in "no heat" setting, or sucking the gaps with a vacuum (careful with this one).

Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.

Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.

Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 08, 2011


Yes-
By clicking the Menu button, you'll see the shooting menu, sort of a red/pink color, with an icon at the top that resembles a camera. The 4th option is Self-timer, which you can set to a 10 or 2 second delay. The next time you press the shutter release to take a picture, the camera will wait that long before taking the photo.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Mar 04, 2011

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