20 Most Recent Canon PowerShot SD630 Digital ELPH / IXUS 65 Digital Camera - Page 2 Questions & Answers


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or attached via USB). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and will work with any future cameras you may acquire.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable hard drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 04, 2013


When you play your videos with your canon PowerShot SD630, try to press the up and down keys to adjust the sound, and the up key is to make the sound loud. Wish this will help you..

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Dec 25, 2012


The SD630 works with SD cards. Your 16GB card is an SDHC card and will not work with this camera. You need to use SD cards, 2GB and smaller.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


You may download a copy of the manual from here.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


You may download a copy of the manual from here.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Follow the instructions on page 33 of the advanced manual. If you need the manuals, you may download them from here.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Look at your memory card. SD cards have a slide switch along one edge. The position farthest from the metal contacts locks the card, protecting it from writes. The position nearest the contacts unlocks the card.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


The date and time (and a lot more) are stored with every picture in its EXIF metadata. Any photo viewing/editing program should be able to display this data. To print this data, please consult the documentation for whatever program you're using to print your pictures. Depending on the program and printer you may print the date on the image, in the margins, or on the back.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Digital cameras require lots of power. As you call on it to do more things like extending the lens and focusing the power requirement goes up.

I had a similar problem with my camera and finally discovered that the problem was with the battery to camera electrical connections. I cleaned the contacts as described in the source link about two months ago and have not had a problem since.

The following excerpts came from the source link. Hope this helps!

Most cameras will reset to original settings if batteries are removed for at least one minute. Remove extra memory to eliminate this as a possible problem. Insert fully charged batteries and restart the camera.

The secret to making digital cameras work better is having good electrical contacts between the batteries and the camera.

Digital cameras require lots of power. If electrical contacts are not really good, this can cause lots of problems so battery and camera contacts must be cleaned properly. Batteries may be fully charged, but will be viewed as low if contacts are not really good. The LCD display is a low steady load, but when lens extension, optical zoom, focus, and flash charging are added in the capture mode; the load is very heavy. With bad contacts, cameras do strange things like making bad pictures or shutting off with the lens out.


To prevent overcharge, use an automatic two or more hour battery charger with safety timer, temperature monitor and trickle charge technology ($9.78). For longer life, NiMH batteries should be charged often and kept in active use. To preserve battery charge, use the view finder and not the LCD display when possible. Maximum capacity is reached after 2 to 4 charge/discharge cycles.

if your lens has come out after the drop.... and wont retract back in... please follow the below procedures
if ur very sure that the battery is fully charged... first we would advice you to change the batteries and see ...... if that doesnt work... the battery contacts may be corroded or bent and hence not making correct contact with the battery
.... sometimes there cud be dust or sand particles in the lens retraction passage... blow out air in those places..... this cud help a great deal.... I was able to fix a similar problem by wiggling the outermost part of the lens.as its trying to go in....
also try Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.
if that doest help
Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install the new batteries, when you turn it on it should come back to life. turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.
if that doesnt help

Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particals that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying the above fixes and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.



Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.
Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.

Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.


regards iversh
if you felt i've spent my time for u... a very helpful rating is appreciated...

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use iPhoto or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


You don't need any software.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or, despite what I said first, you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 28, 2012

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