American Standard Cadet 3 Right Height Elongated Toilet by - ADA Compliant - Answered Questions & Fixed issues


are you sure its the floor connection as it could be the tank one, also if the floor section is there a insert sealed and fitted to the existing floor pipe and then the wax seal around this. similar model video. https://youtu.be/LebANJC2rx4

American... | Answered on Jan 11, 2018 | 140 views


If your toilet is not moving waste all the way to the septic, then there may be a blockage in the waste line or it may not be plumbed correctly. There is no reason why you should not be able to make a full flush on septic. I have live on septic for many years and it should flush as well as living in the city. Is your water supply nice and strong? This sound like a gravity issue with the waste line or a blockage, If you can get under your house and see how the waste line is run, that would be helpful, it should be aimed straight down underneath your toilet and never running uphill at any point on the way to the septic tank. Also is there a vent in the waste line at the proper distance. If not, that could also be the issue. Good luck. P.s. does your septic tank need pumped out?

American... | Answered on Apr 29, 2016 | 361 views


Check the chain the goes between the handle and the flapper.
It should not be taught. If it is it will not permit the flapper to seat
properly and water will leak out. Adjust the chain length so the flapper is seated and there is just a little slack in the chain.

American... | Answered on Aug 02, 2015 | 572 views


The American Standard Cadet 3 flowise one piece toilet uses a flapper valve with a soft nylon washer to seal against the water outlet.
Over time this nylon washer develops 'puckers' causing water to seep between the nylon washer and the seat of the flapper. This seepage causes the water level in the tank to drop to a point where the water inlet valve opens to replace the lost water in the tank.
There are two ways to correct this problem:
1. Replace the soft nylon washer on the flapper, or
2. Replace the entire flapper valve.
Hope this solution helps.

American... | Answered on Jul 27, 2015 | 254 views


Put your hand around the back of the seat and you will feel the nuts. Tighten them by simply turning them.

American... | Answered on Sep 02, 2014 | 562 views


You have something in the blow stopping the waste from going down.

American... | Answered on Aug 23, 2014 | 123 views


You need to replace the tank to bowl nuts, washers, and gaskets as well as the flush valve gasket. One word of caution. When installing the new bolts to hold the tank in, place a rubber gasket under the washer inside the tank, and also one on each bolt under the washer underneath the tank. If you omit the one under the tank you may end up cracking the tank when you tighten it down.

American... | Answered on Aug 23, 2014 | 238 views


You would have to determine what the stain is before an accurate answer on how to deal with it. Can you add a picture?

American... | Answered on Aug 07, 2014 | 96 views


replace flapper with American Standard flapper.

American... | Answered on Nov 11, 2013 | 235 views


It could be a bad seat around the flapper or the flapper itself. Replace flapper with one designed for the Cadet. Check water level and see it doesn't flow above the overflow tube. if it is above the tube lower the float ball by turning the screw at top of ball.

American... | Answered on Nov 11, 2013 | 429 views


Turn knob on top of float ball to increase ball height which will increase water column. Up to 1" of overflow tube.

American... | Answered on Nov 11, 2013 | 329 views


Raise height of water by raising float valve. It has a twist knob at top of ball to raise and lower ball. Column should be about 1 inch below overflow tube.

American... | Answered on Nov 11, 2013 | 112 views


Replace flapper. Use American Standard flapper for your unit.

American... | Answered on Nov 11, 2013 | 100 views


One inch is exactly 2.54 cm, so if you're 5 ft 9 in then you're about 175 cm.

American... | Answered on May 20, 2013 | 105 views


Hello, W/D, toilet expert, here.
The tank has a water level line cast into the inside back of the tank. That's where your water level should ideally be. Now, there are a variety of water level controllers, so we'll hit on the major ones. But first, a little nomenclature, so you'll know what it isn't. If you remove the tank lid, you'll notice a tube in the middle that's open, and usually has a smaller tube inserted or attached to it. This is the overflow tube, and feeds water to the rim of the bowl. At the base of the overflow tube is the flapper, and it controls the majority of the flushing power. The flapper is operated by a chain connected to the flush lever. When the flapper is raised (flushed), the water level drops. On the left side of the tank is the water fill valve, The water coming from the house via the tubing under the tank goes into this valve assembly. Part of this assembly is the all important float.
Older ones have the float at the end of an arm, As the water level falls, the float falls and operates the water inlet valve at the other end of the float, on the water fill valve. As the level rises in the tank, the float rises with the level and shuts off the water when it gets to it's pre-set level. This type is adjusted by positioning the float either by the screw adjustments on each end of the float arm, or sometimes by bending the float arm.
The newer types have the float either built in, or the float surrounds the fill valve. The one that surrounds the fill valve looks like a very fat donut and is very similar to the older float arm type, just more compact. The water level is set by adjusting the linkage between the float and the water valve at the top of the water control valve.
The newer newer type has all of the floating mechanism built in. But cleverly, there is an external adjustment for raising and lowering the water level. On the side of the tube, there are slots and raised dots on the lower tube. The upper tube has slots on the inside of it. There is a white locking tab between the two tubes. Here's how this one works: (Turn your water off first for adjusting this type). The tube is in two parts, an upper and lower tube. They are held in place by the locking tab, and by the slots cast into the two tubes (they intermesh) To adjust this type, you have to raise the lower portion of the locking tab to raise it off of the locking dots, and than revove it. Then, you push down slightly and twist the upper section to unlock it. Set the level higher or lower, twist the two parts back together, and reinsert the locking tab. The aim is to set the water level at the level mark on the tank. This type can be tricky; you'd do best to turn the water off to adjust this type, and turn it back on once you have locked it back in place.
Best regards, W/D

American... | Answered on Apr 20, 2013 | 1,954 views


If you verify that the water supply to the toilet is turned on, push down the float on the flush valve. Water should start flowing. If it doesn't, something (such as debris) may be blocking the valve and preventing filling. The new valve could be defective - permanently closed.

American... | Answered on Jan 12, 2013 | 452 views


I'm contractor for the last 17 years and this is the first time I have problems with the toilet tank installation , I bought four toilets, three of them had a leaking tank I thought that the place that had bolt did not have enough pressure and I put more pressure every five minutes but the toilets kept on leaking, I took the bolts out and I put plumbing putty in the top and the bottom and installed it again but it kept on leaking then i removed the putty and i put liquid teflon on the bolts and finally the leaking stoped. Edit your post: insert-link-blue._v192249896_.gif To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?) I'm contractor for the last 17 years and this is the first time I have problems with the toilet tank installation , I bought four toilets, three of them had a leaking tank I thought that the place that had bolt did not have enough pressure and I put more pressure every five minutes but the toilets kept on leaking, I took the bolts out and I put plumbing putty in the top and the bottom and installed it again but it kept on leaking then i removed the putty and i put liquid teflon on the bolts and finally the leaking stoped. cancel-glossy._v192250345_.gif deletepost-glossy._v192250344_.gif Guidelines

American... | Answered on Dec 07, 2017 | 787 views


try putting some food coloring in it to see if it's leaking anywhere. the coloring will help you identify where it's leaking

American... | Answered on Oct 16, 2014 | 1,582 views


There is a water line cast on or into the side of the tank. They are generally set from by the type of filler system you install. Thats a different matter.

American... | Answered on Oct 18, 2011 | 83 views


The fix for this issue is the water flow tube most likely came out and is running into the tank instead of the overflow tube. Here's a picture of what it should look like. The tube must come out during shipping. Once I put the tube back in no issues with splashing! And until I figured this out I was about to return it to Lowes!
10_1_2011_10_27_29_pm.jpg

American... | Answered on Oct 01, 2011 | 864 views

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