Question about 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

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1997 VW JETTA DIESEL GLOW PLUGS

NEED VW JETTA DIESEL WIRING SCHEMATIC. GLOW PLUG WON T STAY ON LONG ENOUGH TO WARM. ITS SHUTS OFF IN A SECOND AFTER TURNING THE IGNITION KEY ON . BUT I TOOK A TEST LIGHT TO THE CONNECTION ON THE GLOW PLUG. THAT NEVER COME ON FOR THE GLOW PLUG TO WARM UP. I ALSO TESTED THE GLOW PLUG AND FOUND TWO IS NOT WORKING. I TESTED THE GLOW WITH A 12 VOLT TEST LIGHT. ONE END IS CONNECT TO 12 V POSITIVE AND THEN PROP THE OTHER END TO EACH GLOW PLUG . FOUND ONLY TWO GLOW PUG LIGHT UP. CAN YOU HELP?

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You have to replace the defective glow plug. You can test the glow plug without the test light. Just put a wire on the bolted end of the glow plug and connect this to the battery (+) terminal. Then, put a wire around the body of the glow plug and connect this to the battery (-) negative terminal. Hold at this position for a minute or less. Good glow plug will heat up.

As far as the wiring schematics, I will just describe
it. Your ignition switch is connected to the positive
terminal of the battery by way of the fuse in the fuse
box. From the switch it goes to a timing relay before
going to the glow plug terminals. The glow plug body
is screw mounted to the engine block which serves
as the negative terminal. So, as you switch your
ignition, it heats up the glow plug enough to give a
combustion of the atomized fuel in the cylinder piston
of your car causing it to run.

Posted on Nov 21, 2009

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  • Master
  • 560 Answers

The glow plug relay is responsible for the duration of glow plugs, this needs to be the starting point. You should get a 12v out for so many seconds when ignition is switched on.
I have taken the cover off relays in the past, cleaned up the internals, sprayed with circuit cleaner and got plenty more years out of them, worth a try.

Posted on Nov 21, 2009

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1 Answer

Power draw on a 98 vw jetta gt


There are two problems which might be occurring besides the obvious battery terminals needing to odd wire brushing to expose pure silver lead at the conact posts and inside the post clamps. My 2002 Jetta actually had a crushed wiring harness - Good stuff but it may have been assembled somewhere other than Germany and someone banged the wiring just enough to short or create resistance in the crushed copper. This was solved by a new wiring harness under the hood which also involved the Diesel glow plugs burning up all the time. Second problem may be badly installed diodes in the Alternator. I heard that some have them installed backwards, but only one of them in the group, so of course that would play havock with your charging system even though it will have enough forward power to run your engine. Also the control plug-in wiring on the Alternator sometimes gets salt on it and corrosion then won't let the system be able to get currant to your Alternator to make any power. This is a cheap problem to fix, just buy a new $8 Alternator plug-in and solder it to your wiring cable with good heat shrink wrap insulating tubes and a hair dryer.

Dec 17, 2011 | Volkswagen Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The diagram in my haynes manual does not show some parts that are in my 2001 jetta tdi 1.9 turbo. i ran a diognostic and it says glow plug curcuit a malfunction, i changed the plugs and tested the coolant...


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_301.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

Feb 23, 2011 | Volkswagen Jetta Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2000 Jetta diesel. Can you tell me where the plug for the block heater is? If indeed there is one.


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_180.jpg


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.




Please do rate my response. Thanks!

Jan 23, 2011 | 2000 Volkswagen Jetta TDI

1 Answer

Where are the three glow plugs that are used for the heater/cooling located on an 02 vw jetta 1.9L tdi?


In addition to the 4 primary glow plugs, the cooling system also has 3 Coolant Glow Plugs to help provide extra heat to the cooling system in order to warm-up the vehicle's interior more quickly, and enhance overall engine warm-up time. (Example - Some Mercedes diesel engines use electrical heaters in the cabin because their engine is so thermally efficient.)
Likewise, this auxiliary source of heat from the 3 Coolant Glow Plugs is necessary because of the VW 1.9 TDI engines outstanding efficiency, which wastes very little heat.


The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs are located at the end of the aluminum cylinder head (in a protruding flange) directly below the vacuum (brake booster) pump, which also connects to a coolant hose.

tdisline_102.jpg
The 3 Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs use two (underhood) relays which are monitored and controlled by the ECU. During a cold start, the vehicle's interior temperature selector switch helps the ECU choose one of three modes depending on the amount of heat required to warm-up the coolant.

For example, Coolant Glow Plug #1 can be selected to operate all by itself, or #2 and #3 can operate together as a two-some, or lastly, all three glow plugs can form a triple source of heat for maximum enhancement of engine warm-up time.

After the engine is completely warmed up and the thermostat is open, the Coolant Glow Plugs normally shut-off and remain off unless the (thermally efficent) engine cools down sufficiently to have the computer signal them to come back on to keep the engine and cabin air warm. Extensive idling times at stop lights or in the driveway are scenarios where these glow plugs are most likely to recycle on and off.

In conclusion, the period of Preglow and Afterglow is determined by the engine's coolant temperature (during a cold or hot start), which helps the ECU select a predetermined time-cycle for the combustion chamber and / or Auxiliary Coolant Glow Plugs to follow.

Finally, one myth that needs to be immediately debunked, is the belief that the TDI's advanced Glow Plug System is linked to the opening of the driver's side door, which is false! It is also noteworthy to mention that some earlier VW diesel glow plug systems were operated in this manner, but not so with the advanced VW Jetta 1.9 TDI engine.

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1 Answer

1997 Jetta: glow plugs not working. Glow plugs tested good, ne...


Before you invest in a long drawn out Glow Plug replacement etc. A little known issue occurs on the ALH TDI engines. The temperature sensor sending unit. A small blue module that plugs into the coolant hose assembly will cause a P error on the glow plugs that is nothing to do with the glow plugs at all. The part fails and sends a temp error to the engine computer. I tested all the coolant glow plugs, engine glow plugs and glow plug harness and all worked fine. One of the test procedures for the glow plugs is to undo this sensor that will force the glow plugs to come on no matter what temperature. This confirmed my GP system was functional and the sensor was bad. I purchased the part from local VW dealer for $33 US and installed and it is fine. Dependent on your model it can be square or round. The link to this part for your car is http://www.partsgeek.com/catalog/1997/volkswagen/jetta/body_electrical/water_temperature_sender.html

Be sure to have VW Pentosin coolant on hand to refill coolant system as you will lose quite a bit when removing this part. It is located slightly behind the coolant glow plug assembly.. This is the round ones not the ones on the engine block at top.

Be sure that when you replace it you put in a new rubber gasket seal.. its a round rubber seal that should come with your new part. Dont reuse the old one or you will have a leak.

There is a c-clip that holds this in the hole you slide that clip off and wiggle the sensor out. Coolant will run out of the hole, so do this outside. The sensor is easily pulled out. You will need to insert the new part in teh same hole with new rubber gasket and replace c clip. Then plug in wiring harness and you should be good to go.

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3 Answers

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Your glow plugs should warm your engine enough to start ... you do have glow plugs, right?

You might want to appeal to your employer to allow you to plug your Jetta in at the job say mid afternoon or so.

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1 Answer

02 VW Jetta TDI with ALH engine glow plug


this is a common problem for these cars glow plugs go bad like spark plugs however the smoke would lead to bad mass airflow meter. it is not telling ecu corrcet miss. disconnect mass airflow meter. when cold see if this makes it start better. it should would means you need new m.a.f. glow plug issue take a test light place clamp on positive of battery then pull off glow plug connectors place tip of test light on glow plug the bad one will have a dull light unlike the good one which will be brighter. will need new plugs and wire harness four **** connectors and wire striper and crimper will fix concern good luck

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1 Answer

NO POWER TO GLOW PLUGS


I have a '98 Jetta diesel that had problems with the glow plug circuit. I ended up replacing the harness and a fuse. All the information I needed to know I found on this web page:

http://www.tdiclub.com/

You will have to sign up to post questions, but it's free. I've had many other problems as well and found the experts there very willing to work with you.

Tom

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3 Answers

Volks jetta deisel 1997 won't start


DEPENDING HOW COLD OUT IT IS DIESELS DONT LIKE TO START IN COLD WHEATHER UNLESS THE GLOW PLUGS ARE WARM THIS IS THE REASON FOR PLUGGING DIESELS IN MOST WONT START IF ITS COLD OUT IF ITS NOT THAT COLD OUT IT SHOULD START IF YOU HAVE ENOUGH BATTERY POWER MAYBE THERES NOT ENOUGH FUEL GETTING UP TO THE THROTTLE BODY HOPE THIS HELPS

Oct 23, 2008 | 1997 Volkswagen Jetta

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