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Oil leak dr0ping onto exhaust caused white smoke

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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That will happen when oil evaporates on a hot exhaust
to stop it , repair the oil leak

Posted on Sep 16, 2017

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6ya6ya

6ya staff

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Anonymous

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SOURCE: White smoke coming out of exhaust even when engine is warmed up.

on the 3.8 ussaualy not the head gasket but the upper intake gasket . antifreeze leaks inside intake and into the cylinder. very common. the new gaskets are much thicker.or the plastic plenum the black plastic part on top of the engine goes bad around the water inlet and need to be replaced . when i do either job itell the person to replace both at same time saves money and headaches in the near future. hopes this helps .....and cost for a shop to do this $1100 to $1500

Posted on Dec 08, 2008

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: oil leak

On my 97 OBW their was a kidney shaped plastic plate, just to the right of the rear crank seal on the back of the engine. The seal is known to fail. some people buy a new metal one, I just resealed mine with a good sealer. I had my engine out doing the heads, so I also replaced the crank seal. My fathers Outback had the same leak. if its leaking more to the passenger side right under the bell housing you can pretty much make a bet thats it.

Posted on Jan 27, 2009

scott gibson

  • 29 Answers

SOURCE: coolant leak

More than likely it is coming from the intake manifold. You can use a pressure tester that hooks to the radiator and use a flashlight and mirror to get a better look at where it is coming from.

Posted on Apr 02, 2009

blueextc3221

blueextc3221

  • 15935 Answers

SOURCE: large puff of white smoke from tailpipe

White smoke is indicative of a leaking head gasket or cracked head.
The liquid enters the combustion chamber and is ignited with the gas - and the exhaust is water vapors.

(unless you drove through a puddle that splashed watyer onto the exhaust)

The head gasket/cracked head is most evident on startup.

If your coolant level goes down with no visible leaks - your problem is internal (head gasket failure or cracked cylinder head).

Thanks for using FixYa - a FixYa rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.

Posted on Apr 26, 2009

mecanica03

ROBERT GARCIA

  • 918 Answers

SOURCE: porsche 993 turbo 1995 oil leak

this a turbo problem, you must to repair turbo

Posted on Jul 05, 2009

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2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

Nov 17, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I'm looking to purchase a used car. I've been doing online research and saw this webpage http://www.usedcarsmells.com . They talk about exhaust color and smells. Is it true that you could tell a lot about...


Yes this is correct, you can get important information from the colour of smoke from the exhaust:

Blue/Gray Smoke: Blue/gray exhaust smoke is an indication of oil burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible symptoms and causes:
Valve Seals: Leaking valve seals will cause blue/gray smoke at startup because oil leaks past the seals into the cylinder after the engine shuts down.
Valve Guides: Excessive clearance between the valve stem and the valve guide allows oil to leak past the gap into the cylinder.
Piston Rings: Worn or damaged piston rings will cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Worn Cylinder Walls: Worn cylinder walls cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
PCV System: A stuck closed PCV valve will cause excessive crankcase pressure resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Black Smoke: Black exhaust smoke is an indication of a rich fuel condition. These are possible causes:
Fuel Injectors: A leaking or dripping fuel injector will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Pressure Regulator: A stuck closed fuel pressure regulator will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Return: A restricted fuel return line will cause a rich fuel condition.
White/Gray Smoke: White exhaust smoke is an indication that coolant is burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible causes:
Cylinder Head: A crack in the cylinder head (around the coolant jacket) will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Engine Block: A crack in the deck of an engine block near the coolant jacket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Head Gasket: A damaged or blown head gasket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber resulting in white/gray smoke coming from the tailpipe.

Jan 17, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Why is my 2000 kia sephia blowing blue smoke from the tailpipe. it has 86,000 miles. the check oil warning light is on even though the dipstick reads full.


The most common cause of blue exhaust smoke is oil leaking past engine seals and into the cylinders where it then mixes and burns with the fuel. This is most frequently seen in older or high mileage cars with worn seals and gaskets. It only requires a very small amount of oil leaking into the cylinders to cause excessive blue exhaust smoke.

Blue exhaust smoke only at start-up can indicate worn piston seals or damaged or worn valve guides which may also cause a rattling noise. An external engine oil leak can drip onto hot engine and exhaust parts causing what appears to be blue exhaust smoke. Other possible causes of blue exhaust smoke include: piston wear, worn valve seals, a dirty or non-functioning PCV valve, worn piston rings, an intake manifold gasket leak, worn engine oil seals and possibly even head gasket failure.

Oil leaking into the cylinders can cause a rough idle, misfire and fouled spark plugs. In addition, a reduction in power and oil loss can be indicators that the blue exhaust smoke is caused by an internal engine oil leak. Internal engine oil leaks can also allow fuel to mix with the oil in the crankcase which will degrade the oil and prevent it from adequately protecting the engine.

Operating a car with a severely dirty oil filter, air filter or improperly functioning PCV valve can also sometimes result in engine oil blow-by, oil loss and blue exhaust smoke. Periodically checking the engine oil level with the oil dip stick will indicate if there is excessive oil consumption. Higher viscosity engine oil can sometimes temporarily reduce the amount of blow-by; however, this is not generally recommended. Excessive blue exhaust smoke indicates a possible internal engine oil leak that should be inspected by an ASE certified mechanic.

Dec 08, 2014 | 2000 Kia Sephia

1 Answer

My 1998 Mazda millenia Is shorting white smoke more tell pipe what could be the problem


It is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke. One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located. THESE LEAKS WILL CAUSE SEVERE ENGINE DAMAGE! Have the car inspected immediately.

I
Internal coolant leaks can and will cause

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

95 camaro oil leak causing smoke


You need to determine if it is your oil pan, oil sender switch, oil filter, etc. dripping oil onto your exhaust causing the smoke, or if it is coming out of the exhaust itself. If it is dripping onto the exhaust, deal with sealing the affected area. (new oil pan gasket, sender switch, etc.) If coming out of the exhaust, indicated worn piston rings or valve seals.

Jul 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 93 Mazda .mx3 4 cylinder 5speed with white smoke from exhaust how do I check where it's coming from to cause the white smoke its minor on idol but when gas pedal pressed there is more visible...


White smoke from the exhaust may be an indication that coolant is leaking into the combustion chamber. This could be caused by a faulty cylinder head gasket, a cracked or warped heat or cracked block. Check the coolant level, and check to see if the oil dip stick has a milky look.

Causes of White Exhaust Smoke

May 27, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine concern


Smoke (blue or black) or steam (white)? White smoke is really steam that is caused by water leaking onto hot surface. Could be leaking from hose running to heater coil under dash, or something else. Check radiator water level to make sure water level is ok. Blue smoke is oil burning. This could be dangerous, caused by similar scenario of oil leaking on a hot surface (from a gasket leak, etc), or exhaust fumes. Black smoke means something is actually burning and could indicate fire. Black or blue some could fill vehicle cabin with toxic fumes, even if you don't smell anything bad.

Jan 02, 2014 | 1995 Isuzu Trooper

2 Answers

2001 ford windstar .Dorman 615-177 kit was installed .It has 350 miles on it since the install but on startup it's blowing white smoke.doesn't stumble ,idles fine and drives fine.Smoke is just brief on...


Valve seal leaks will cause an engine to smoke on start until the oil burns off. If a head gasket were leaking it would be smoking constantly.

If you need further help, reach me via phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/james_8f14c50d9c6cdea8

Feb 23, 2018 | 2001 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

Large puff of white smoke from tailpipe twice-still drives-have old oil leak. what caused smoke?


White smoke is indicative of a leaking head gasket or cracked head.
The liquid enters the combustion chamber and is ignited with the gas - and the exhaust is water vapors.

(unless you drove through a puddle that splashed watyer onto the exhaust)

The head gasket/cracked head is most evident on startup.

If your coolant level goes down with no visible leaks - your problem is internal (head gasket failure or cracked cylinder head).

Thanks for using FixYa - a FixYa rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.

Apr 26, 2009 | 2001 Mazda Millenia

1 Answer

White smoke exhaust


White smoke is caused by coolant or water coming out the tail pipe. There is a chance that the white smoke was caused by water splashing up from a puddle onto the exhaust pipe. Keep an eye on the coolant level in the radiator in any event. If its less then there leak coolant leak in the car engine which is causing this problem....

Oct 18, 2008 | 1988 Isuzu Impulse

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