Question about 1999 Acura TL

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Where is the cam/crankshaft sensors located on a 99 acura 3.2tl

Trying to change cam/crankshaft position sensor

Posted by Anonymous on

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6 Suggested Answers

Anonymous

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Blair

  • 41 Answers

SOURCE: where is the b1 s1 o2 sensor located on my 2003

bank 1 sensor 1 il locates right infront of the catalytic converter . bank 1 sensor 2 is located in the catalytic converter

Posted on Jan 06, 2010

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Pablo Gonzalez

  • 733 Answers

SOURCE: location of the knock sensor on a 2001 Acura TL

The knock sensor is part #8 on the diagram. seems to be inside the engie. call your acura dealer to verify. if it is, it's a lot of work.
http://estore.honda.com/EPC/asp/rjane007.asp#

Posted on Feb 16, 2010

duane_wong

Duane Wong

  • 6826 Answers

SOURCE: Need a pic or diagram

Oxygen Sensor-I don't have a location of the Bank 2 sensor, so you'll have to guess on it by determining how many sensors you have by inspecting the exhaust system from the exhaust manifold down to the catalytic converter and past the catalytic converter which is downstream. Anything before the catalytic converter is upstream.
Do you have a code that describes which O2 sensor is not responding correctly?

Test/Replace

  • The sensor is threaded into the exhaust manifold.
  • It can be difficult to remove unless a special anti-seize compound is coated onto its threads.
  • Torque the sensor to 30 foot-pounds using a special socket.
  • A sensor that is too loose or a cracked exhaust manifold can result in a lean signal to the computer.
  • Check the vents in the thimble of a replacement O2 sensor.
  • There should be the same number of holes and they should face clockwise or counterclockwise like the ones on the original sensor.
  • Installing the wrong sensor can result in slower cross counts.

---
Operation
Although the oxygen sensor is termed a sensor, in actuality it is a galvanic battery. The oxygen sensor compares the potential difference between the ambient oxygen content around the exhaust and the oxygen content present in the exhaust stream. When the exhaust sample is lean, there is more oxygen in the exhaust as compared to the atmosphere. When the exhaust sample is rich, there is less oxygen content in the exhaust as compared to the atmosphere. The greater the difference between ambient oxygen and exhaust oxygen content, the greater the voltage produced.
For the oxygen sensor(s) to operate properly, it has to reach an operating temperature of approximately 600°F before a consistent voltage potential can be generated.
The Engine Management System (EMS) determines the state of readiness of the oxygen sensors by supplying a bias voltage of approximately 400 - 500mVDC to the oxygen sensor. As the sensor begins to warm up, the voltage produced increases due to rich exhaust mixtures commanded by the EMS. When the EMS senses a return voltage greater than the bias voltage, the computer will command the fuel mixture lean. When the output voltage from the sensor drops below bias voltage levels, the computer will command a rich mixture again. When the EMS determines that the O2 sensor has responded properly and within a predetermined amount of time, it will begin using the sensor as an input to adjust fuel trim.
Many Oxygen sensors used in OBD 2 engine management systems incorporate heaters. These heaters raise the sensors up to operating temperature quickly. The sooner the oxygen sensor gets to operating temperature, the sooner the EMS can maintain closer control over emissions, economy and performance. The oxygen sensor provides the computer with necessary information to maintain favorable operating conditions for the catalytic converter. The role of the catalytic converter is to store oxygen for the reduction of HC, CO and NOx emissions. The oxygen sensor input is used by the EMS to protect the catalytic converter by cycling the air/fuel mixture rich and lean. This provides adequate oxygen for storage while maintaining cool enough operating temperatures to prevent catalyst damage.
In addition to controlling the converters operating conditions for emissions control, the computer uses the oxygen sensors to tailor fuel trim providing a balance between fuel economy and performance.
Abnormal sensor activity has a profound effect on pulse-width and fuel trim strategies. Sensor values that indicate lean conditions will cause the computer to command changes in short term fuel strategies. Conditions such as secondary misfires create excessive HC levels. This also produces high oxygen levels in the exhaust. The oxygen sensor will sense only the increased oxygen content and input to the computer will be below bias voltage levels. The computer will respond by commanding additional fuel.
OBD 2 vehicles use oxygen sensors downstream of the converter(s) to monitor the efficiency of the catalyst. When the catalyst performs properly, available oxygen is used resulting in low levels oxygen in the exhaust sample. While downstream oxygen sensors are constructed the same as upstream oxygen sensors, the values that they generate are different. With relatively richer mixtures present around the downstream oxygen sensor, voltage inputs to the computer will be above the 450mV bias voltage. If the catalyst is operating effectively, the downstream oxygen sensor will cycle when the catalyst is flooded with oxygen. Typical values from the downstream oxygen sensor(s) are between 550- 900mV at idle.
While the downstream oxygen sensor is used to monitor catalyst efficiency, the upstream sensor has a pronounced effect on performance. Lean oxygen sensor values will result in an increase in pulse-width, excessive emissions, surging, hesitation, and potentially catalyst damage. Additional fuel can cause the catalyst temperatures to rise due to an afterburner effect in the converter. The oxygen sensor is the only post combustion input to the EMS. Other malfunctioning systems affect its operation.
Improper rich indications will cause lean operating conditions that may result in loss of power, hesitation, surging, poor idle quality and possibly converter damage. Sensors that do not switch properly, or are lazy do not provide accurate information to allow the computer to properly maintain the air/fuel mixture. Faulty heaters do not allow the sensors to reach operating temperature fast enough and the vehicle may remain in open loop for longer periods of time. Malfunctioning heaters also allow the sensors to cool down during periods of extended idle.
A faulty oxygen sensor due to loose connections, bad grounds, high resistance in the circuit, or opens in the circuit can cause the following symptoms.
Related Symptoms
  • Surging at idle
  • Unstable idle
  • Running rough off idle
  • Hesitation
  • Stumble
  • Chuggle
  • Poor fuel economy
  • Spark knock
  • Stalling on acceleration
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Posted on Oct 15, 2010

ZJLimited

ZJ Limited

  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: on 1996 Acura tl 2.5 where is located the speed

For 1996 Acura TL 2.5L PFI 5cyl the Vehicle Speed Sensor - Location is located mounted on transmission.


zjlimited_595.jpg


Fig.: Exploded view of the vehicle speed sensor (click for zoom).



Hope this helps (remember to rate this answer).

Posted on Feb 01, 2011

Testimonial: "thak you very much for your help "

dmac0920

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: I ran a diagnostic on

It sounds to me like a timing issue. Did you recently have the timing belt changed on the car? If not, then it seems that the bad sensor is tricking the car into thinking it is out of time. My guess is that the sensor will need to be replced, then if it is only a code issue, the problem should resolve itself. If the timing belt has not been changed recently, when was it last done? the belt could have jumped a tooh knocking it out of time. I would say step one is replacing the sensor, reset the code and take it from there. Hope this helps, Good luck.

Posted on Feb 22, 2011

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1 Answer

P0016 and P0017 check engine pop up after i run for 10 to 15 miles?


the common causes for code P0017 are as follows:
  • A faulty cam or crank sensor
  • The cam or crank circuit is open or shorted
  • The timing belt/chain is out of time
  • The cam or crank tone ring is slipped/broken
  • A problem in the VVT system P0016 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor A) P0017 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor) God Bless! Hope this helps you.

Mar 08, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

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Was getting gas & spark & now no spark on any plugs


Crankshaft position sensor , possibly !
Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor
The crankshaft position (CKP) sensor is a three wire sensor based on the magneto resistive principle. A magneto resistive sensor uses two magnetic pickups between a permanent magnet. As an element such as a reluctor wheel passes the magnets the resulting change in the magnetic field is used by the sensor electronics to produce a digital output pulse. The PCM supplies a 12-volt, low reference, and signal circuit to the CKP sensor. The sensor returns a digital ON/OFF pulse 24 times per crankshaft revolution.
There are a lot of videos on youtube on testing crankshaft position sensors an Cam sensors !
There

Dec 18, 2015 | 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe

3 Answers

How is possible that my 99 yukon has no crankshaft position sensor?


if we are talking the 5.7L camshaft sensor is built intoto the distributor. It is replaceable. Crankshaft Sensor is located front of engine on bottom, right at the Harmonic Balancer. it is easily replaceable.

Jan 18, 2015 | 1999 GMC Yukon

1 Answer

04 buick ranier rough idle almost stalls


DTC P0016 - Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor A)
The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) and Camshaft position sensor (CMP) work in harmony to control the spark/fuel delivery and timing. They both consist of a reluctor, or tone, ring which passes over a magnetic sensor, which generates a voltage, indicating position.

The crankshaft sensor is part of the primary ignition system and functions as the "trigger". It detects the position of the crankshaft relays that information on to the PCM or the ignition module (depending on the vehicle) to control spark timing. The Camshaft position sensor detects the position of the camshafts and relays the information to the PCM. The PCM uses the CMP signal to identify the beginning of the injector sequence. What ties these two shafts and their sensors together is the timing belt or chain. The cam and crank should be precisely timed together. If the PCM detects that the Crank and Cam signals are out of time by a specific number of degrees, this P0016 code will set.

Symptoms of a P0016 will or may include:
Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) illumination
The engine may run but with reduced performance
The engine may crank but not start
The engine may exhibit a rattle near the harmonic balancer indicating the tone ring is damaged
The engine may start and run, but poorly

Causes may include:
Timing chain stretched, or timing belt skipped a tooth due to wear
Misalignment of timing belt/chain
Tone ring on crankshaft slipped/broken
Tone ring on camshaft slipped/broken
Bad crank sensor
Bad cam sensor
Damaged wiring to crank/cam sensor
Timing belt/chain tensioner damaged

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using Fixya, and have a nice day.

Nov 15, 2011 | 2004 Buick Rainier

2 Answers

Where does the cam-crank sensor go on a 1993 pontiac bonneville?


I don't know about the cam sensor, but the crankshaft position sensor is located just behind the crankshaft pulley, or possibly even right on the pulley. Should be just a small little thing with a couple small bolts holding it down. If you are changing it out, just be very careful to get it reinstalled in exactly the right position, they can be very finnicky.

Aug 20, 2010 | 1993 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

Is the crankshaft position sensor the same as a cam sensor


no, the crankshaft position sensor is mounted to the lower portion of the engine for monitoring crankshaft revolutions, while the cam sensor is mounted up top to monitor camshaft revolutions to control timing, and fuel injector command

Jul 02, 2010 | 1997 Buick Park Avenue

2 Answers

Jaguar xj 40 sovereign 1994 error code 17


I'm not a Jag expert, but error code 17 is:
P0017 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor B)
Additional infomation on and cause and possible solutions are here:
http://www.obd-codes.com/p0016
Basically, it looks like you have timing issue. Could be the cam or crank sensor or the timing belt.
The P0017 code would imply that you have at least two cam sensors (V6 or V8). The computer thinks that the B sensor cam is out of time with the other cam and the crankshaft. Depending on the cost and location, you might try changing the cam sensor first. The cost to check or replace the timing belt is probably going to be painful.

Jun 12, 2010 | 1994 Jaguar XJ6

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Crankshaft and camshaft sensors location in nissan altima 2003


You are incorrect sir. There is a very good Youtube video showing you exactly where it is that is how I changed mine. The Crankshaft is located behind the engine block below and around from the cam sensor which is easly spotted looking at the engine. The crankshaft is in a difficult spot but once you figure out where it is it's easy...ish hope this helps

Dec 08, 2009 | 2003 Nissan Altima

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