Top 20 1996 Honda Civic Questions & Answers


A bad TPS causes a hesitation in the same spot when you accelerate. It's like a dead spot.

1996 Honda Civic | 62 views | 0 helpful votes


check the light switch on the stalk. Also check the relay it will be under the bonnet . Voltage should be supplied t0 the relay when light switch turned on and then relay should click on and voltage 12 v should be switched to the headlight from the switched relay contacts. Suspect worn light switch . You could run a wire from 12v to contact on relay that powers the coil on the relay to prove if relay works and switch is cause of your problem

1996 Honda Civic | 45 views | 0 helpful votes


Hello,

Not good.

Wrong filter, damaged filter or filter not tight enough.

Double check.

Did you get an oil light on dash (2 quarts low).
The computer may have shut the engine down before engine failure if you are lucky (oil light). If you did not blow your engine (sieze) and you fix the filter problem put some 'lucas' oil in your engine to help with excessive friction caused by low oil level.

I hope this helps.

1996 Honda Civic | 45 views | 0 helpful votes


You may need to bleed the slave cylinder. If that doesn't work, replace the master cylinder.

1996 Honda Civic | 52 views | 0 helpful votes


probabbly the transmission mounts, or if its standard it could be that the Synchros if it has any is damaged, or your clutched is totatlly messed up

1996 Honda Civic | 56 views | 0 helpful votes


Might have air in the system. With engine cool, take radiator cap off and start car. Let it come to operating temp and ensure fan kicks on/off as it should. Keep hands clear of rotating parts - fans, belts, motors. Replace cap and make sure there is water in the overflow reservoir.

1996 Honda Civic | 68 views | 0 helpful votes


the "dimmer switch" is part of the combination switch. They wear down, internally - I've taken apart a used one, so I know. Also, the headlamp connectors like to corrode on that model year ( I also have 96 civic, and had to replace a headlamp connector). https://www.hondapartsnow.com/parts-list/1996-honda-civic-4dr_ex-ka-4at/combination-switch.html (parts 8 and 9)

1996 Honda Civic | 110 views | 0 helpful votes


Disconnecting any sensor will cause a non working car to work suddenly.I would check two things. 1. The Transmission control module- vary rare issue. 2. the ignition control module. These break down a lot in Honda's. In the 96-98 model of the civic, the dash uses the tach built into the ignition control module. the 99-00 model doesn't use the ICM tach signal, but uses the same module. Test your ICM with a digital multi meter ($5 @ harbor frieght), before dropping $60- 140 on one.

1996 Honda Civic | 44 views | 0 helpful votes


my guess would be that the wiring that runs from the car to that door is probably shorted inside the rubber boot. pull it back and check the wiring in there

1996 Honda Civic | 53 views | 0 helpful votes


You have a loose harness plug that goes into the back panel of the meters under the dash. Make sure it is plugged in well. You can use a long wood dowel to push it in. Make sure the other connections you can see anywhere are good an tight also'
Mike

1996 Honda Civic | 68 views | 1 helpful votes


The fuel pump is controlled by the PGM-fi main relay. If there is no power to the fuel pump,check this relay

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1996 Honda Civic | 387 views | 0 helpful votes


This vehicle should be fuel injected and has no choke

1996 Honda Civic | 127 views | 0 helpful votes


You have a problem with the automatic choke. It is not shutting off.

1996 Honda Civic | 112 views | 0 helpful votes


The EVAP (Evaporative Emissions) System allows fuel tank vapors to be purged into the engine and burnt rather than expelled into the atmosphere as harmful emissions. The EVAP system contains a pressure sensor to check the integrity of the system. Periodically, the EVAP system performs a pressure test to check that there are no leaks in the system. It uses this sensor, also known as a fuel tank pressure (FTP) sensor to check for leaks. Basically P0453 means the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) noticed the EVAP Pressure sensor or FTP is indicating a higher than normal pressure (above 4.5 Volts) in the EVAP system. NOTE: On some vehicles the FTP is a part of the fuel pump assembly in the tank. Potential Symptoms There will likely be no noticeable symptoms along with this code other than the MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp), commonly known as Check Engine Light illumination. However, there may be noticeable fuel odors in some cases. Causes A P0453 DTC trouble code may be caused by one or more of the following: Open on FTP sensor signal wire Short to voltage on FTP sensor signal wire Bad FTP sensor Abnormally high pressure in fuel tank due to blockage in EVAP purge hoses or overfilled tank Loose/damaged FTP sensor connector Loss of ground to the sensor Possible Solutions Using an scan tool access FTP sensor value with Key on Engine off (KOEO). Normal value is usually somewhere near 2.5 Volts at atmospheric pressure (may fluctuate some due to altitude). It shouldn't ever be above 4.5 Volts. 1) If it is close to 2.7V with the gas cap off, the problem is likely intermittent. Using a Digital Volt Ohm Meter, measure the voltage on the signal wire while trying to induce the problem by wiggle testing all the wiring at the FTP sensor. If the voltage fluctuates when wiggle testing, check for connector problems; i.e. water in the connector, broken or chafed wiring. 2) If the value shown on the scan tool is above 4.5V, unplug the sensor (if possible) and check for voltage again. If the high voltage is still present when unplugged, inspect wiring harness for a short to voltage on the signal wire. If the high voltage disappears when unplugging the sensor, check for a good ground to the sensor and proper reference voltage. If you have a good ground and 5 Volts reference voltage, replace the FTP sensor since it's likely shorted out. Other EVAP DTCs: P0440 - P0441 - P0442 - P0443 - P0444 - P0445 - P0446 - P0447 - P0448 - P0449 - P0452 - P0455 - P0456

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0453
Copyright © OBD-Codes.com

1996 Honda Civic | 703 views | 0 helpful votes


Change your ignition module. The distributor is a weak point of the Honda, I will always change out the whole thing than just try the coil.

1996 Honda Civic | 345 views | 1 helpful votes


Reasons for popping noise:
Popping noise could occur due to the malfunction in the ignition system, leaky valves, weak cylinder compression, carbon accumulation in the combustion chamber or lean fuel.
1. Ignition system malfunction (Misfire).
Check:
- The ignition timing.
- Spark plug gaps.
- Use colder type spark plugs.
- Ignition module and ignition coil.
- Distributor cap and rotor.
- Spark plug high tension cords.
2. Cylinder compression:
- Check valves clearance.
- Perform cylinder compression test.
3. Fuel system (For lean state).
- Check fuel filter for clogged.
- Check fuel injectors.
- Check fuel pump pressure.
- Check fuel regulator.

1996 Honda Civic | 167 views | 0 helpful votes

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