Top 10 2003 Suzuki Aerio Questions & Answers

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Question

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keyless remote does not work after replacing batteries

how do i reprogram my keyless entry....i replaced the batteries now it doesn't work at all.

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I had the same problem and located the addendum to the owners manual. It's kind of overcomplicated it seems. Here is what it says:
1) Confirm all doors are closed and the key is out of the ignition.
2) Open the driver's door and put the key in the ignition within 10 seconds.
3) Remove the key within 10 seconds.
4) Push and release the driver's door switch 3 times within 20 seconds.
5) Insert the ingition key within 10 seconds.
6) remove the ignition key within 10 seconds
7) press and hold both "lock" and "unlock" on the transmitter for more than 5 seconds within 20 seconds of removing the key All doors will lock/unlock to confirm the process has been properly done.
8) Press "lock" or "unlock" on the transmitter within 5 seconds of completing step 7. All the doors will lock/unlock to confirm that the process was properly done.
At this point the transmitter has been properly programmed.

Of course, this didn't help me. My transmitter still does not work. I did confirm the procedure with a known good transmitter, so it is valid. If the lock/unlock does not happen in step 7, you more than likely have a bad transmitter.

Posted on Nov 30, 2008

Question

  • 3,970 People Helped

where located fuel sensor Suzuki Ario 2003

where located fuel sensor Suzuki Ario 2003

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Answer

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Component location diagrams for most 2003 Suzuki Aerio cars and light trucks sold in the U.S. from 1990+.
clsk2003aeri003.gifIgnition System Components Location Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio 2.0 L4 GAS
Components on diagram:

  • TP Sensor
  • Ignition Coil
  • ECM
  • MAF Sensor
  • CMP Sensor
  • clsk2003aeri007.gifElectronic Shift Control System Components Location Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Data Link Connector
  • Transmission Range Sensor
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Pressure Control Solenoid Valve
  • Battery
  • clsk2003aeri010.gifInstrument Panel For Connector Layout Diagram Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Clutch Switch
  • Thermistor
  • Brake Light Switch
  • Blower Motor Relay
  • Heater Fan Motor
  • clsk2003aeri011.gifInstrument Panel Harness Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Wiper Switch
  • Washer Switch
  • Data Link Connector
  • Turn Signal Relay
  • Radio
  • clsk2003aeri015.gifHeadlight System Location Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Headlight Relay
  • Headlight
  • Clearance Light
  • Headlight Diode
  • Clearance Light Relay
  • clsk2003aeri022.gifFuel System Components Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Fuel Pump Relay
  • Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor
  • EVAP Canister
  • Fuel Tank Pressure Control Valve
  • Fuel Filler Cap
  • clsk2003aeri027.gifFloor For Single Unit Parts Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Wheel Speed Sensor
  • ABS Control Module
  • G Sensor
  • Air Bag Control Module
  • EVAP Canister Vent Valve
  • clsk2003aeri030.gifInstrument Panel For Ground Point Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Instrument Panel Ground Points
  • clsk2003aeri036.gifEngine Compartment For Single Unit Parts Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • Throttle Position Sensor
  • Horn Relay
  • Radiator Fan Control Relay
  • Cruise Control Module
  • Condenser Fan Relay
  • clsk2003aeri037.gifEngine Compartment Components Diagram for 2003 Suzuki Aerio SX 2.0 L4 GAS
    Components on diagram:
  • MAP Sensor
  • Knock Sensor
  • Noise Suppressor
  • Heated Oxygen Sensor
  • Posted on Sep 18, 2011

    Question

    • 2,947 People Helped

    how do you change the transmission filter on a

    how do you change the transmission filter on a 2003 suzuki aerio with an automatic transmission?

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    Answer

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    By removing automatic transmission oil pan out from gearbox.

    1. Filter for 4-Speed, transmissionmfrcode : 60-40LE.
    AC Delco Automatic Transmission Filter
    2003 Suzuki Aerio: GS all engines, S all engines, SX all engines. AC DELCO TRANSMISSION OIL FILTER -- Magnetic 3/8 in. in-line filter; A high quality, direct fit OE replacement transmission oil filter; With 12-month or 12,000-mile AC Delco warranty. Price around $40. tdisline_285.jpg 2. Filter for 4-Speed, transmissionmfrcode : MX1. AC Delco Automatic Transmission Filter
    2003 Suzuki Aerio: GS all engines, S all engines, SX all engines. AC DELCO TRANSMISSION OIL FILTER -- 15 holes; A high quality, direct fit OE replacement transmission oil filter; With 12-month or 12,000-mile AC Delco warranty.
    tdisline_286.jpg

    3. Filter for 2003 Suzuki Aerio: GS, S, SX all 2,0 liters 4 cyl. engines.
    Beck Arnley Automatic Transmission Filter
    2003 Suzuki Aerio
    BECK ARNLEY AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FILTER -- A high quality, direct-fit OE replacement automatic transmission filter.
    tdisline_287.jpg

    Posted on Feb 19, 2011

    Question

    • 2,796 People Helped

    Engine code p0420

    Engine code p0420

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    Answer

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    A code P0420 may mean that one or more of the following has happened:

    •Leaded fuel was used where unleaded was called for
    •An oxygen sensor is not reading (functioning) properly
    •The engine coolant temperature sensor is not working properly
    •Damaged or leaking exhaust manifold / catalytic converter / exhaust pipe
    •Retarded spark timing
    •The oxygen sensors in front and behind the converter are reporting too similar of readings

    Some suggested steps for troubleshooting a P0420 error code include:

    •Check for exhaust leaks at the manifold, pipes, catalytic converter. Repair as required.
    •Use a scope to diagnose the oxygen sensor operation (Tip: The oxygen sensor in front of the catalytic converter normally has a fluctuating waveform. The waveform of the sensor behind the converter should be more steady).
    •Inspect the downstream heated oxygen sensor (HO2), replace if necessary
    •Replace the catalytic converter
    One thing to note is that many vehicle manufacturers offer a longer warranty on emissions-related parts. So if you have a newer car but it's out of it's bumper-to-bumper warranty, there still may be warranty on this type of problem. Many manufacturers give a five year, unlimited mileage warranty on these items. It's worth checking into.

    Posted on Apr 02, 2010

    Question

    • 2,575 People Helped

    what type of oil does my 2003 suzuki aerio take?

    what type of oil does my 2003 suzuki aerio take?

    Posted by on

    Answer

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    You should be useing 5w30 oil in this car.

    Posted on Dec 17, 2009

    Question

    • 2,305 People Helped

    suzuki aerio engine 2.0L have timming belt or chain?

    suzuki aerio 2.ol have a timming belt or chain

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    TIMING BELT SHOULD BE 60,000 MILE CHANGE

    Posted on May 08, 2009

    Question

    • 2,215 People Helped

    I have a 2005 Suzuki

    I have a 2005 Suzuki Aerio. The AC is blowing out air, but it doesn't get cold.

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    Answer

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    You are most likely not getting any cold air because your A/C compressor is not engaging when you hit the switch. A number of different problems could give you this result.

    First, you could have a blown fuse; that would be the cheapest and easiest solution. Second, your A/C system may be low on freon, and a low-pressure safety valve may be keeping the system from operating. However, rather than simply adding some freon to your system, it makes more sense to borrow a set of A/C pressure gauges and hook one up to the low side of your system (i.e., at the port where you would otherwise add R-134a refrigerant) to get an accurate pressure reading. A slightly low reading indicates that natural wear and tear on the system has let enough of the R-134a out of your system that it needs to be replaced. However, an inappropriately high or low reading not only indicates that you're low on freon, but also that there's a more substantial leak somewhere in your system. In this situation, adding refrigerant without addressing the leak may damage your compressor over time, as crucial lubricating oil drips out of the system and isn't replaced. A third and less likely cause for your problem is that the dashboard switch to turn on your A/C may be broken. This does happen, though if the switch is lighting up when you engage it, it's probably not the problem. Fourth, and most expensive, your A/C compressor may have failed. This would be somewhat unusual in a 2005 car, although it's not out of the question if you have used your A/C system a great deal.

    Because of the cost of replacing damaged A/C components, it may make the most sense to let a certified shop handle any A/C system repairs once you have an idea of what's wrong. Full servicing of your system will evacuate all existing oil and refrigerant, identify and fix any leaks, and then vacuum test the system before filling it with fresh oil and R-134a. The end result will very likely work better and last longer than the cheap fix of dumping a can of R-134a into the system and hoping for the best.

    A number of years ago, I lost all freon and pressure in my A/C system when a rock kicked up from the street hit the A/C cooling condenser and caused a pinhole leak. I couldn't find the leak; I only knew that my A/C system had lost pressure. That's the kind of problem that an A/C service center will be able to diagnose and fix much better than someone without the right equipment.

    Posted on Jun 01, 2011

    Question

    • 2,136 People Helped

    whats is te cylinder heads

    whats is te cylinder heads torque for suzuki aerio 2.3 lts

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    Answer

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    Hi! Please don't forget to rate! Thanks!



    c17hydro_181.gif

    Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-2.0L and 2.3L engines



    Apply engine oil to the bolt threads and tighten the cylinder head bolts, in sequence, using the following 6 Steps:

    • Step 1: 38.5 ft. lbs. (53 Nm)
    • Step 2: 61 ft. lbs. (84 Nm)
    • Step 3: Loosen all of the cylinder head bolts
    • Step 4: 38.5 ft. lbs. (53 Nm)
    • Step 5: 76 ft. lbs. (105 Nm)
    • Step 6: Bolt M6 (bottom left of cylinder head) - 8 ft. lbs. (11 Nm)

    Posted on May 12, 2011

    Question

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    Where is the crankshaft sensor located in a 2003

    Where is the crankshaft sensor located in a 2003 suzuki aerio?

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    Answer

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    Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor - Removal and Installation

    Removal
    Remove engine with transmission from vehicle referring to ENGINE ASSEMBLY REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION .
    Remove transmission from engine and then remove flywheel or drive plate from crankshaft.
    Disconnect connector from crankshaft position sensor.
    Remove crankshaft position sensor (1) from cylinder block (2).

    Installation
    Reverse removal procedure noting the following.
    Check to make sure that crankshaft position sensor (1) is free from any metal particles and damage.
    Apply engine oil to O-ring of sensor.
    Install crankshaft position sensor to cylinder block (2) with specified torque.
    Tightening torque
    Crankshaft position sensor bolt (a): 6 N.m (0.6 kg-m, 4.5 Lb-ft)

    d62e5fb.jpg
    Fig. 28: Installing Crankshaft Position Sensor To Cylinder Block

    Connect connector and fix wire harness with clamp securely.

    Courtesy of SUZUKI OF AMERICA CORP.

    Hope helps!!!

    Posted on Mar 08, 2010

    Question

    • 1,952 People Helped

    SUZUKI AERIO ENGINE CUTS OUT ,JERKS AND SURGES ON

    SUZUKI AERIO SX ENGINE CUTS OUT ,JERKS AND SURGES ON ACCELLERATION,MANUAL TRANSMISSION

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    Answer

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    I have a 1.6L Liasna/Aerio. 2002.130,000km.
    Recently it had a problem, a problem that I seem to see on other websites.
    The vehicle was cruising on the highway and suddenly jerked, surged, and cut out. Another case was when it was stopped at the lights and the RPM faded to a cut. Accelerator application would not keep the rpm up.

    The common factor in all four cases was that it was a very hot day. Temp was 32-35 degrees C, (around 95 degree F).

    I let the vehicle cool down and then got a restart and limped home. Sometimes had a repeat enroute. A dangerous exercise, having the engine cut on a busy highway!

    The vehicle then started and ran on cooler days without a murmer.

    The local Suzuki shop had a look at it but nothing showed up on the inbuilt computer!

    After a fourth incident I took it back to the Suzi shop and this time the service rep said that they had had a few other Liana's come in with the same problem. These vehicles were with the later larger engine, the 1.8L M18A.
    The problem it would appear was the CRANK ANGLE SENSOR. A bit of solid state kit it costs about A$100 and is located near the alternator. After replacement I have had no problems but I need to do some driving in hot weather to really find out.
    In the trouble shooting game you sometimes need to work on the process of elimination so I also had the air filter replaced as well as the Air Inlet Temp. probe (IAT). (Both inexpensive).
    From reading up on Suzuki Liana/Aerio (US) problems I can see more than a few which I can put down to a problem with the CAS.
    Some vehicles seem to have a problem in that they will turn over but not start. Again most likely a CAS problem. It would seem to me that if there is one consistant problems with Lianas/Aerios then it is a faulty CAS.

    The CAS replaces the older distributor. A gear wheel in the engines turns next to the CAS and that in turn passes a signal to the vehicles computer to fire the spark plugs. The CAS may be a solid state bit of kit but can still fail.

    Radiators. The Liana has two radiators, each with their own electric cooling fan. The left unit is for the engine block cooling fluid. The right unit is for the air con unit and for external cooling of the engine block and accessories mounted behind the engine. Both radiators have heat sensors. The left has a temp probe that when high turns on the elec cooling fan. The right cooling fan will come on when the air con unit is turned on or when the engine block gets hot. Be advised that the Liana/Aerio runs cooler than a lot of other vehicles so, even on a hot day, the fans may not come on when you expect them to. The CAS unit is located in a hot part of the engine so when the outside air temp rises, such as on a hot day, the temp of the engine block and the oil inside it as well as the air around the CAS probe rises and that is when the unit fails.
    Perhaps I if I were to design or modify the Liama (a great little vehicle) I would direct a bit more cooling air around the CAS.

    The CAS is a part of modern cars and I note that the CAS in other cars also fail so it is not a Liana/Aerio only problem. Given time and experience car designers will rid us of this over-temp CAS failure problem with better design.

    Comment; If you are having a problem such as described then get the CAS replaced. It may be the item that the mechanics overlook in their trouble shooting but is the key to your problem.

    Enjoy driving your Liana/Aerio! I do!

    Posted on Jan 09, 2010

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