Question about Freezers

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Ffu20fc6aw4 Freezer runs too much. Located in garage. Runs almost non-stop in summer; 0 degF here & still cycles often. Defrost coil does not ice up, defrost element OK, defrost tstat will open & close. Have replace freezer tstat. Seems like it could be the defrost timer stuck in ON position, causing unit to defrost every time defrost tstat closes. Food stays frozen & temp stays around 0 deg F in freezer. Is it logical defrost timer could be the problem.

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  • Freezers Master
  • 4,048 Answers

How old is your model you have. a weak pump will make the system slower to get to temp even a broken seal can do this. even just a few mil gap can make it do this. if you close the door then re-open it it should be harder to open the door. this is the seal being nice and tight to its fittings.

Posted on Jan 30, 2014

Testimonial: "Unit is 10 yrs old. Door seals seem to be fine including when trying to re-open."

  • 6 more comments 
  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    with the unit on do you hear what would sound like water running round in side ? or does the unit make a ringing sound ? you can also test the units resistance at the plug wile unplugged see how much resistance there is at the pug with no doors open.defrost cycle brings the unit to room temp... unless your room temp is 0c then it would not be this. weak motor or broken pump will keep the unit going all the time even low gas... low gas can happen over time it does leak out as aske before in this reply if there is no running water sound it could be this. there are a few place that will refill the system but it has to have the valve fitted ton the line. does the pump and the element get hot? pump getting hot but not element is one sing there is no flow our uneven flow if half of the vented element gets hot and some times is just warm to touch should be fairly hot. when in good working order.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    Room or outside weather is hot. It is normal for the freezer to work harder under these conditions.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    Freezer had recently been disconnected for a period of time. Freezer requires 4 hours to cool down completely.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    Large amounts of warm or hot food have been stored recently. Warm food will cause the freezer to run more until the desired temperature is reached.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    Freezer gasket is dirty, worn, cracked, or poorly fitted. Clean or change gasket. Leaks in the door seal will cause freezer to run longer in order to maintain desired temperature

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    If the freezer does not get cold the evaporator fan motor might have stopped working. On the back wall of the freezer, normally behind a panel which can be removed, there is a small fan. This fan draws air over the evaporator cooling coils and moves it around inside the freezer. If the freezer does not get cold, the evaporator fan motor should be checked. Often the fan motor will not run when the door is open, activate the door switch for the fan to work. If the evaporator fan motor doesn't run when the freezer is cooling and the door switch is activated, it should be replaced.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    If the freezer does not get cold the temperature control thermostat might be defective. The thermostat allows power to flow through to the compressor, evaporator fan and condenser fan. Try rotating the temperature control thermostat all the way from stop to stop and listen for a click. If there is a clicking sound the thermostat is probably good. If not, remove it and check it for continuity. It should have continuity when the freezer is calling for cooling.

  •  Russ Hill
    Russ Hill Feb 09, 2014

    If the freezer does not get cold the compressor might be defective. The compressor is a motor which compresses the refrigerant and circulates the refrigerant through the evaporator and condenser coils. There are several other components which are more likely to be defective if the compressor doesn't work. If the compressor itself is defective a licensed professional will have to do the repair. sorry for the separation but would not let me put it all on

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 237 Answers

SOURCE: Whirlpool Freezer Model #EV150NXENOO

This one sounds like the defrost timer is not working and you are not getting a defrost cycle every 6-8 hours (or when needed). Another issue could be that air (moisture) is getting in from a leaky door seal, etc. and causing the freeze up. If you have a sealed system problem where the cooling coils are not uniformly frosted up then the defrost thermostat will not "know" there is an ice condition and therefore not go into defrost mode (same issue if the defrost t-stat is bad). After you have ALL the ice out of the unit it would be a good idea to take the interior rear cover off so you can view the coils. Start the freezer back up and watch over the next 1/2 hour or so to see that the entire coil is frosting up uniformly. If it isn't you may have a plugged system, a leak causing low refrigerant, etc. If over time the coils look uniformly frosted up you may have a defective defrost heating element itself (no heat, no defrost sort of thing). The defrost elements can be checked with a multimeter for continuity if you know how to do that sort of thing. It's hard to know a person's ability by these forums or if they can tackle certain test procedures.

Posted on Nov 13, 2006

  • 150 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore Upright Freezer Model 253.9239780 Temp alarm, Temp rising slowly

you have a refrigeration issue partner let her go 16 yrs. is good service you can replace it for 3 to 5 hundred the repair will be that IF you can find someone with the r-12. don't go for a top it off and go deal the food you lose is to expensive for that to be economical.

Posted on Apr 23, 2008

  • 124 Answers

SOURCE: freezer stops and start

ice cream is always the last to freeze and a temp of minus -10 degrees is usually required to get it to get hard. if you put the ice cream in the door it will be especially tough to freeze. a good thermometor is a good investment as you can observe the temps. usually ten degrees or 20 degrees is what they run. yes they do cycle on and off as long as they hold temps thats good. the outside of the freezer gets warm because the hot compressed refrigerant is spread through piping near its surface giving up its heat of compression . setting the stat to max will freeze the ice cream eventually but utility bill suffers . good luck

Posted on Nov 02, 2008

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Related Questions:

1 Answer

What wrong with my upright freezer


Defrost element is not working. Check for continuity of the element along with proper operation of defrost timer.

Apr 15, 2015 | Freezers

1 Answer

Frigidaire freezer runs a lot. Located in garage. In summer runs almost non-stop. Currently outside temps are below 0 deg F and freezer still cyles frequently. Have replace the freezer tstat. Defrost...


Yup, these timers have a tiny clock motor that can get lint on them, causing motor failure, should be simple replacement. Refrigerators in cold garages run more to regulate their temperature below 45 degrees.

Jan 29, 2014 | Freezers

1 Answer

The inside of unit is only reading 20 degrees. Door seal is okay.


Start off by cleaning the condenser coils. If you get up on a step ladder or chair look for the radiator in front of a fan. This radiator gets hot when running. If the air flow is stopped by dust or grease in the coils ther freezer will not work properly. Be sure the fan is running also whenever the compressor is running. The next most common problem is that the inside coils are frozen over. Your unit must defrost 3 or 4 times per day. When the door is opened frost accumulates on the inside coils and will eventually cover the coils with ice if your defrost cycle is not working. If the coil freezes over the temperature will go up, the compressor will continue to run and it the temperature will continue to increase. Check the inside coils for ice. If there is ice, you will have to unplug the unit and let the ice thaw completely before restart. If the unit pulls down to 0 after restart, it was probably frozen over. If that is the case you will need to either increase the number of defrost cycles or verify that the defrost cycle is working. Try this and repost if that does not resolve your problems.

Sep 23, 2010 | True 31 cu. ft. / 878 liter Commercial...

1 Answer

I have a true 2 door freezer with bun rack rails...it is runninig between 7 degrees up to 59 degrees...we vacumed the vents...do we need more coolant or what do you think...it is about 4 years old and...


Vacuuming the coil is not usually sufficient to clean them properly. Hold a flashlight behind the radiator on top of the freezer to see if you can see freely through the coils. If not, the best way to clean the coil is to spray coil cleaner on there and flush with plenty of water. It is a mess but it will get the grease off the coild. If you do not have gauges to check the pressures of the refrigerant (lets call it freon), you can get a good guess by doing the following: Get a ladder, climb up so you can see in the top of the cabinet where the compressor is located. It looks kind of like a bowling ball. There will be one small copper line and one large copper line running from the compressor. The small line is the high pressure line. It should be hot enough to burn your finger. It then goes through a small pan where it evaporates excess water, then to a "radiator" which has a fan running behind it. If the machine is running this fan should be on. The small line then runs into the freezer box. At this point the line should be warm, not hot to the touch. If this is not happening you are probably low on freon. The other copper line on the compressor is returning from the freezer box to the compressor. It should be very cold to the touch. It should have moisture collection on it. If this is not happening you are probably low on freon. Other factors can effect your freezer. Make sure the fan near the compressor is running. Make sure the fan or fans inside the freezer are running. They will stop running when you open the door, so hold the door button in when you check the inside fans. Check also to see if there is a build up of ice on the inside coil. Your freezer should run a defrost cycle 4 times a day to remove the ice. If it has ice it will not run properly. If you can remove your product for 24 hours and shut the freezer down, prop the door open and the ice will melt. On restart if the freezer goes down to 0 quickly (30 minutes) it was probably frozen over. This may indicate a bad defrost timer or heater. Try these things.

Sep 08, 2010 | True Freezer TG2F-2S

1 Answer

Not freezing


Either the defrost circuit has failed or the refrigerant is low - my money is on the defrost circuit.

Most defrost circuits have three main parts:

1) defrost electric heating coil
2) defrost terminator
3) defrost timer.

The heating coil and terminator are in the freezer compartment - behind a protective panel. The heater is usually piggy-backed on the freezer coil and the terminator is in contact with the freezer coil to detect its temperature. The defrost timer is a simple assembly of a clock motor with switch contacts that can be located anywhere the manufacturer desires. The timer turns on or enables the defrost circuit every 8 or so hours for up to 30 minutes give or take.

When the timer has enabled the defrost cycle, the cooling mode ceases; the compressor shuts off and power is sent through the terminator to the heater. The heater warms and melts any ice build up on the freezer coil. The water drips to a pan and flows down the tube to a pan under the fridge - where it is evaporated off. The heater warms the freezer coil until either a) the timer returns to cooling mode or b) the terminator senses a preset rising temperature on the freezer coil. Once either condition is present, power is interupted and heating stops. The compressor is energized through the adjustable thermostat in your fridge. Since it is warm, the compressor turns on and cooling begins.

If any of the components listed above (1,2 or 3) have failed, the defrost cycle never warms the freezer coil and the ice never melts to clear the freezer coil as intended. Air can not be circulated through the freezer coil since it is choked with ice, so even though the compressor runs, the fridge and freezer spaces never get colder. The adjustable thermostat never sees the temperature you've set so the compressor never shuts off.

Water dripping in the fridge is melting ice from the freezer space - as the freezer is not getting colder - only the protected space around the freezer coil is.

To fix this, you'll have to get the service manual or schematics for the fridge to determine where the parts are located and do some troubleshooting with a multimeter after disassembling the freezer compartment and wherever else to access the timer if needed. This is not a good first appliance repair job for a DIYer due to the danger of refrigerant and testing live electrical parts in closed in spaces.

I hope this helps.

May 20, 2010 | Kenmore 20.3 cu. ft. / 575 liter Upright...

1 Answer

Frost free freezer forming layer of clear ice on floor of freezer


This sounds like clogged drain / hose in the freezer compartment, here's why:

When the defrost circuit turns on, the compressor turns off. The defrost coil melts frost that collects on the freezer coil and drips in to a small pan located below the coil. The pan is formed so that the water that drips in it can flow to a hose connected under it. When the defrost cycle completes. the compressor runs again, bringing the temperature in the freezer to about 0 again. Any water remaining anywhere in the freezer will turn to ice very quickly.

If the hose should become clogged with ice, or slowed by mold, bacteria, etc. - water flow will be slowed, and / or eventually stopped. Ice will become thicker and thicker on the floor of the freezer as there is no place for the water to go.

A service manual for the appliance would be a good idea, but may not be required. You'll need to unplug the freezer and empty the contents. Defrost manually with a hair dryer or other heat source. If you decide to chip away ice, do so carefully.

The defrost and drain area of most refrigerator / freezers are located behind the rear panel of the freezer compartment. This is where the manual would indicate where the parts are located. Remove any ice maker installed if needed to remove the back panel.

Defrost any ice previously hidden by the panel. Chipping ice here should be a last resort, as sharp edges can damage cooling coils, tubing and the drip pan itself. Use a turkey baster filled with hot water to direct a stream at the area of the pan filled with ice. Hot water will likely have to be directed down the opening on the pan to melt ice in the hose as well.

Once the ice is cleared, mix about a 10% to 20% solution of bleach and water (1/2 ounce bleach to 3 ounces water) and direct down the drain hose. This will kill and inhibit further growth of mold and bacteria in the hose, which should help it drain water quickly.

Re-assemble and plug into power.

I hope you found this Very Helpful. If you need more help, ask again - but include the freezer manufacturer's name and model number. Good luck!

Dec 03, 2009 | Freezers

1 Answer

Freezer won't freeze



If the evaporator coils behind the back panel of the freezer are icing up because of auto defrost failure that will stop the circulation of cold air and eventually affect the freezer too.
The evaporator coil behind the cover on the back wall inside the freezer will ice up under normal conditions. Every 8 to 10 hours for around 20 minutes the defrost timer (or in most newer models the electronic adaptive defrost control) will turn the defrost heater on to melt the built up ice. There is a defrost thermostat which prevents the heater from overheating the freezer by breaking the heater circuit when the temp reaches close to 32 degrees F. The entire cooling system shuts off during the defrost cycle and starts back when the timer advances through the cycle.

If this ice is not melted it will continue to build up until the air can’t flow over the coil to circulate the cold air through the freezer and into the fridge. The temperature change in the fridge is usually noticed first followed by the freezer.

If the defrost thermostat is bad it can prevent the heater from coming on OR it won’t turn the heater off when it gets too warm. It is clamped to the evaporator coil at the top to sense the temp. If it appears to be misshapen it is bad.
With an ohm meter it should show continuity when cold and none when warm.
You can also bypass the thermostat to see if the heater comes on then. If it does then you know the thermostat is bad and needs replaced.

The defrost heater is located on the evaporator. It is in a tube which is at the bottom and can also go up the sides of the evaporator. On some types you can see a burnt spot if it’s bad. With an ohm meter it should show continuity from end to end when disconnected from the wiring in the freezer. You can also test the wiring for voltage when it’s in the defrost mode.

If you have a defrost timer you can test it. It can be located under the fridge behind the kick panel on the front. Some are in the fridge with the controls at the top. You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer because that means the timer is not running. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

If you have an adaptive defrost control instead of a timer, replace it if the heater and thermostat test good. It is located in the fridge with the controls in some models and on the back in others.

Nov 08, 2009 | Frigidaire Freezers

1 Answer

My admiral fridge/freezer runs a lot but does not get down to temperature


If the evaporator coils behind the back panel of the freezer are icing up because of auto defrost failure that will stop the circulation of cold air and eventually affect the freezer too.

check defrost timer, defrost heater, defrost thermostat. In most newer models the timer has been replaced by an electronic control board. If the heater and thermostat are ok it’ll be the control.

You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.

Sep 14, 2009 | Freezers

1 Answer

Water does not drain from the Freezer during the defrost cycle


hi thanks for the question the drain hose goes to the underneath by the compressor thaw out the freezer and clean the drain hose this will solve the problem thanks the appliance doc

Sep 12, 2008 | Frigidaire 13.7 cu. ft. / 388 liter...

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