20 Most Recent HP Media Center m7250n (ED842AA) PC Desktop Questions & Answers


I love ram questions, (not easy)\
1
1
.5
.5
-------------
3 GB

my guess is your windows XP virus magnet is stuffed
XP is a dead OS, and has Zero support.
not does HP support it.

so what to do.
well its super easy.
1: boot to a linux live CD or stick
if linux likes it , your XP is hosed, like all are now,hopeless.!

if linux does not like the mem. then you bought the wrong ram.

try to know that BIOS does not get the final call on good mem
all it does really is PnP the spid chip there asking what i is.
and then passes that INFO data to windows.
did you run BIOS memory test? it too is crude,
in the end only a running good windows proves any memory is good. for sure loading a huge photo shop say 5 times.

the new sticks must be 240 pin, DDR2 SDRAM
PC2-3200 MB/sec (minimum)
the must match your CPU,
the Pentium D is old.
and many memory makers do not make ram to fit old CPUs.
2005 PC,a tad old no?
the best place to get it is Kingston or Crucial.
did you? or buy fleabay crapppppp


questions did you run the PC with just 1 , 1GB stick
if that fails and beeps like made the sticks are no good.
then next 1GB stick alone, beeps again, dead pC>
yup wrong DDR2.

the Intel chip you must make happy is the i945p
at its clock rates (called speed)
do look on kingston .com first.
m7350 seem there oldest one. in this line of HP PC.
good luck finding good memory.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Nov 12, 2017


this could be as a result of the ip address been the same or the systems not seeing each other

HP Media Center... | Answered on Mar 08, 2016


The blinking light could be a number of things. Is there a pattern to it? Does the computer make a beeping sound? It sounds like a definite hardware failure, and the pattern will tell you what it is. Without the pattern, I couldn't tell you the exact problem.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Mar 08, 2014


try remove the CMOS battery on the mainboard... and put it back after a few seconds or 1 minute..

HP Media Center... | Answered on Dec 19, 2013


Could be a Driver Problem..... did you use windows update before this issue? might need to go into the device manager (right click mycomputer and then click properties) and roll the drivers back... its aworth a try

HP Media Center... | Answered on Oct 15, 2013


And? do you have a question? Do you have a problem? If so, what is it?

HP Media Center... | Answered on Aug 10, 2013


sunny,try with a other powersupply if possible.
faulty PSU are often the cause.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Jul 13, 2013


During a power outage their is a surge when power come back on the grid (surge can be caused by lighting strikes akso). This surge trips the internal procters inside the power supply to protect the Mother Board, hard drive, processor and fans and any device that pulls wattage from the power supply. Since all these power using devices are trying to pull power at the same time to boot the computer back up one ends up with a loop of surge thrugh the power supply with a protective trip, reset, surge again and trip again. This will continue in this loop as the computer is trying to boot all the devices at one time (Mobo, Hd, processor, cooling fans and other devices). Simoly, more power wattage is being demanded than the protectors will allow at one time causing a protective shutdown followed by a restart followe by a protective shutdown in a continious loop.
The normall sequence for a boot is to boot the board, processor and fans followed by a boot of the hard drive, and other boot devices once the board is energised, NOT all devices at the same time, as this results in an overload and trips the protectors. This protective loop is indicated by the blinking light as the power is turned on and then shut down for protection as the wattage pull is over the demand that the protectors will allow.
Blinking light indictes you are in the protective loop.
SOLUTION: 1. Disconnect the Mother Board connector, with the computer unplugged, this will allow the power supply to reset at maximum wattage upon reboot.
2. Disconnect the Hard Drive power connector and ay boot device power supply cables, this will allow the Mother Board, processors and fans to boot without an overload of the protector inside the power supply.
3. Plug in the computer and the indicator light will be solid green indicating that it is reset and out of the loop.
4. With the computer pluged in and the Power Supply fully energised, plug in the Mother Board. The computer will now boot, and the processor fan will come on and the cooling fans.
5. After computer has rebooted, shut the computer back down and connect the Hard Drive power cable and any other power cablis that were unplugged.
6. Reboot with all cables connected and you are up and running again.

POWER SUPPLIES HAVE AN INDICATOR LIGHT FOR A REASON.
REMBER - BLINKING LIGHT IS AN OVERLOAD OF THE PROTECTORS AND ELLIMINATING THE OVERLOAD SOLVES THE PROBLEM AND THAT THE POWER SUPPLY IS WORKING AND CONVERTING POWER.
NO LIGHT MEANS NO POWER OUTPUT AND THAT INDICATES THE POWER SUPPLY IS NOT FUNCTIONING AND NEEDS REPLACED.

Hope this helps everone with power outages and lightining strikes. It is a rather common problem and can also occure when building a computer and one missmatches the power supply with the board wattage needs. If the board wattage needs are greater than the power supply output you will get stuck in a potective loop eventually. WHEN BUILDING A COMPUTER ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE POWER SUPPLY CAN PRODUCE MORE WATTAGE THAN YOU CAN CONSUME AT THE MAXAMUM LOAD.
Have a great computing experiense.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Mar 13, 2013


If you run the Windows 8 update advisor (available on the microsoft website)on your computer you may find that the hardware is too old for windows 8, as it was built to run windows XP. The only way round this would be to update the graphics and add an audio card that is windows 8 ready. I hope this helps.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Feb 18, 2013


What are you heating with a dryer? i have never heard that one before? Who came up with that idea and why? Are the fans comming on? Curious?

HP Media Center... | Answered on Dec 26, 2012


Can you be a be more clear? What is your question?

HP Media Center... | Answered on Dec 22, 2012


i have the same problem and my power button is broken. i just stick a knife in the side of the button and wiggle it around. maybe your power button is ********.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Dec 10, 2012


Power Supply is bad Ron.

Electrolytic Capacitors inside the Power Supply are breaking down.

To wit;

Since you didn't state the model number, I'll just choose one for an example, and the Troubleshooting Tools and Utilities information;

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx620/en/ug/A02/tindex.htm


http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx620/en/ug/A02/tools00.htm#wp1105370

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx620/en/ug/A02/tools00.htm#wp1114432

Took you the 'Long way' to show you the steps in finding troubleshooting information. May help you in the future.

"Blinking Yellow - A power supply or system board failure has occurred"

Now about Electrolytic Capacitors;

The Electrolytic Capacitors used on your motherboard, (Unless some are solid Polymer capacitors), are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.

A basic example,

http://www.amazon.com/Gino-Radial-Aluminum-Electrolytic-Capacitors/dp/B006228QMY


Basic construction of a Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor:

A) The case is a thin aluminum cylindrical shape. Looks like an aluminum 'Coca-Cola' can with no top, or bottom.

Wrapped with a plastic sleeve.

B) The top is a flat thin aluminum round disk, and has a shape etched partway into it. Usually a lK or X.
This is the Vent Cover.

C) The bottom is a flat synthetic rubber disk, and is called the Bung.
The two leads of the capacitor come through the Bung.

D) Inside the case of the capacitor are three strips;
1) One strip is thin aluminum metal, and is called the Conducting Strip. It has the Positive ( + ) lead attached to it. (Lead - think wire)

2) The second strip is also thin aluminum metal, but has a non-conducting medium applied to it.
It is the Non-Conducting Strip, and has the Negative lead attached to it.

3) The last strip is a paper-like strip, and is soaked with Electrolytic Paste.

The paper soaked strip is laid in-between the two metal strips, and all three are rolled up tightly.
(In reality there are many layers of these strips)

When an Electrolytic Capacitor starts to fail, the Electrolytic Paste develops a gas inside the capacitor. Hydrogen Gas.
The gas expands, and starts pushing Electrolytic Paste out of the capacitor.

Either the lK or X of the Vent Cover will pop open, and paste will ooze out,
And/Or,

Paste will ooze out of the seal area, around the outside edge of the Vent Cover,
And/Or,

One side of the Bung at the bottom of the capacitor will be pushed out, and paste will ooze out.

So much paste loss, and the capacitor operates at a weakened state.
TOO much paste loss, and the capacitor fails.

A capacitor is designed to slowly build up a charge, then release it all at once.
Older camera designs use capacitors for their flash unit.

Another way of explaining, although crude, is a large swimming pool is slowly filled with water by a garden hose, then one wall of the pool is taken down all at once.

This is why a Power Supply can start to work, then fail.
Some of the capacitors inside are failing.

Just thought it would be better than stating, "Replace your Power Supply"

Do I recommend trying to repair the Power Supply?
NO
Dangerous (As in could KILL you), voltages are inside, even with the Power Supply unplugged from power, and for weeks, months, and over a year, after being unplugged from power.

Also clean the inside of the computer out with a can, or two of compressed air for computers. Computer unplugged from power, AND Anti-Static Precautions -> FOLLOWED.

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply
The two cooling components for the SMPS are Heatsinks, and a small internal Fan,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ATX_power_supply_interior-1000px_transparent.png

The Heatsink/s are shown in-between the letters B and C, and
C and D.
Finned aluminum 'blocks' connected together in a vertical line.
(Vertical line in the photo)

A Heatsink absorbs heat from whatever object it is placed against, and the fins of the Heatsink radiate the heat away.
The small internal fan helps carry heat away from the fins.

When in-between the fins, and around the fins of the Heatsink, are clogged with 'Gunk', and the Fan's blades, center hub, and surrounding cage (Shroud), are clogged with 'Gunk', the cooling capacity drops tremendously.

Just takes a light coat of 'Gunk'.
('Gunk' = Dirt, dust, hair, lint, etc)

Heat = Wasted Energy
The Power Supply tries to keep up with the call for power, but eventually cannot, and components inside start to fail.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

[One more thing. Dell used to be a proprietary computer manufacturer. This means they wanted THEIR parts used in THEIR computers.

One design change they had made, was to change the standard pinout of the ATX main power cable, coming from the Power Supply.

Had the Power Supply manufacturer design, and make Power Supply's to their (Dell) ATX main power cable designation.

They also had the motherboard manufacturer, change the ATX main power cable connector pinout, on the motherboard.

Examples of both types of ATX main power cables that are used,

1) 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

2) 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

1) Orange wires are 3.3 Volts. (DC)
2) Red wires are 5 Volts. (DC)
3) Yellow wires are 12 Volts. (DC)
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

You can see the Standard pinouts for the wires above in the links.

USING the Lock on the side of the ATX main power cable's connector, use it to orient the connector, and follow the pinout of those wires.

Are they the same as the ones in the links?

People with these older types of Dell computers in the past, were replacing the Power Supply, BUT not buying from Dell.
This means they bought aftermarket Power Supply's.

Wiring pinout for ATX main power cable did Not match.
MANY people burned out their computers.
'Smoked' the motherboard, Processor, Ram Memory, Harddrive, and a graphics card IF used.

Yes. People were SO happy! (?)
Dell changed pretty quickly.
Check your ATX main power cable.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Oct 27, 2012


if you want to know what this is the error code is related to

click start control panel administrative tools computer management then select event viewer this may vary depending on what operating system you have


extend the events there you will see errors in red you will no what exactly what the error was and at what time it occured

or click start type in event viewer press ENTER

you might be able work your way through the problem
if you need more help with this post a reply with the error message details

hope it helps

HP Media Center... | Answered on Oct 06, 2012


Often when colors dissapear the reason is a broken cable, between the computer and the monitor, try another cable / monitor to see if the problem is solved, if not, then the problem is either your graphics card or the settings on your computer, it is possible to adjust them so that you don't get red color for example at all.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Aug 12, 2012


http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&ProdId=407&DwnldID=17906&lang=eng

your board is an asus, and your chipset is intel, use the update utility to download the correct drivers.

If you need further help, reach me via phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/joel_63c670a84e9f6a97

HP Media Center... | Answered on May 19, 2012


It is the 4-pin connector that comes out from the power supply unit. There are mainly two types of hard drive power connector, i.e. SATA and IDE. Sorry that i am unable the pictures b'cause i'm on fixya mobile, please follow this link to see the pictures google.com/m/search?client=ms-opera-mini

HP Media Center... | Answered on Apr 08, 2012


Hello jerault, To answer your question you can call HP at this number and request the recovery disk for your pc 1800-474-6836.
However There should be a recovery partition on your computer. To access it, power on your computer. You will see a message on the screen telling you to hit f10/f11, or a few other possible keys to enter recovery. Follow the prompts until setup is completed.
good luck

HP Media Center... | Answered on Aug 16, 2011


shorted processor out from static.

HP Media Center... | Answered on Jul 28, 2011

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