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When jumpstart in my feet 3084 magna I hooked up positive to the negative and lost all power do I need to replace my 30 amp battery has has at least 11 amps but bike has no electrical power

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  • Gregg Mahin
    Gregg Mahin May 15, 2018

    Hi, Steve, I would really love to help you with your motorcycle question but due to the magnitude of yesterday's solar flare the batteries in my crystal ball are dead and my mental telepathy headset circuitry was melted. I need the year, make, and model of your motorcycle please click on " For More Information" directly above and provide this information in the box that will open and then click on the green "SEND" box in the bottom right-hand corner after it posts I will receive an "ALERT" icon that will allow me to respond to your information. Good luck and have a wonderful day.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Car amp re conecting the the battery

Hook up the battery, (the negative post) and then put the fuse in. This is the best choice because if you put in the fuse and then put the negative post back in and the wires slip when putting in the negative post, the fuse might blow due to the sparks. You will then need to get another fuse, which also mean sending more money.

Posted on Dec 04, 2007

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SOURCE: seat removal to get to battery

shoul be one allen head screw on the back of the back seat and 2 more behind the front seat. this will allow you to remove the passenger seat then the drivers seat will slide out from under the fuel tank

Posted on Jun 26, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: only one sub works

i have 2 subs and 2 amps both wired properly but one bose not seem to run how can i fix the problem please really stuck?

Posted on Mar 22, 2010

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: We have a motor trend

Manual can be found at
http://www.thorsentoolco.com/Links/PDFs/11-414.pdf

Posted on Nov 27, 2010

  • 250 Answers

SOURCE: I changed the battery and

At a guess, I'd say that you have got the new battery in back to front. This means that you are hooking the earth wires to the Positive side of the battery.

Posted on Mar 24, 2011

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1 Answer

Have lost my manual for my car Jumpstarter A56JX is there anyway I can get the instructions for it


LOL what do you need to know? it real simple you have a plug to plug it in to charge it To jump start connect the read lead to the positive side of the Battery First, then connect the black to the negative post. the bigger post is positive and smaller is negative. Just be sure which is right before connecting.

Dec 17, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1994 Honda VF 750 C Magna no battery power


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
94 magna has no power to anything
Honda Magna VF750C Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda 1995 VF750C Magna Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

Apr 06, 2014 | 1994 Honda VF 750 C Magna

1 Answer

1996 Honda VF 750 C Magna regulator test


Hi, Benlusk before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
1996 Honda Magna voltage regulator test Bad
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda Magna VF750C Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda 1995 VF750C Magna Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


Jun 02, 2011 | 1996 Honda VF 750 C Magna

1 Answer

How do you connect the amp with the stereo


  • Choose where to put your new amp. If you are installing subwoofers it's usually best to put the amplifier in the trunk next to or attached to your subwoofer enclosure. If you are going to power your main car speakers with the amplifier then it may be better to put the amp under the passenger's seat.

  • 2

    Purchase the following wiring for the amp: A thick power cable (the thickness required depends on the total wattage of your amp, ask a sales rep or consult your amplifier's manual for the proper gauge) that will have to reach from your battery to the amp (the power cable should also have an inline fuse to protect the amplifier); 3 feet of ground cable of equal thickness as the power cable; an RCA signal cable to carry the left and right signals from your head unit to the amp; a "remote on" wire which can be any thin wire (20 to 24 gauge) that will also run from the head unit to the amp; speaker wire (if you are powering subwoofers you should only need about 3 feet of 12-gauge wire per sub, if you're going to power your main speakers you will need enough 16-gauge wire to reach each speaker from the amp, 12 feet per speaker is usually safe).

  • 3

    Gather the following tools: Screwdrivers, wire cutters, wire strippers, pliers, a utility knife, sandpaper, masking tape with a pen for labeling, 2 crimp-on o-ring ends for the power and ground cables. If you're hooking the amp to your speakers, you'll also need 2 crimp-on female spade connectors for each speaker.

  • 4

    Find a manual with instructions on taking off the dash of your car (not the whole dash--just the head unit, in order to hook wires to the back), and also to get at your car's speakers if you are hooking the amp to them.
    The Installation

  • 1

    Disconnect the ground (negative) cable from your battery. Never work on the electrical system of your car with this connected.

  • 2

    Attach the side with the fuse of the thick positive (+/red) power cable to the connector on the positive terminal of your battery; the o-ring can be sandwiched in the bolt on the connector that connects your car to the battery. Now put the fuse in the fuse holder.

  • 3

    Run the power cable through the firewall of your car (there is usually an opening on the driver's side) and to your amplifier. If your amp is in the back it is usually best to run this wire under the plastic molding that goes along the bottom edge of your car. Be careful where you run the wire because the power cables should never be near the signal or speaker wires.

  • 4

    Find a metal bolt or screw on the metal of your car near the amp to connect the ground cable to. This should be as close to the amp as possible, never more than 3 feet. Unscrew it and clean the metal surface with sandpaper. Attach the ground to it with the o-ring and screw it back down firmly.

  • 5

    Remove your head unit and run the signal and remote on wires from behind the head unit to your amp. Connect the RCA connectors and the remote on wire to the back of your head unit.

  • 6

    (If you are installing subwoofers and not running your normal speakers off the amplifier skip to step 7.) Run the 16-gauge wire from each one of your speakers to the amplifier. On the amp side use the masking tape to label each wire so you know which speaker it is. On the speaker end-strip a 1/4 inch off the ends of the wires and crimp on the female spade connectors with your pliers. Connect the spade connectors to your speakers making sure to match the positive (+/red or white) with the positive terminal and the negative (-/black) with the negative one.

  • 7

    Connect everything to your amplifier. Only strip off as much as you need off the end of each wire to make a solid connection, you don't want any exposed wire hanging out. If you have subs, attach them to the amp with the 12-gauge speaker wire.

  • 8

    Secure your amp to something. If it is in the back you can screw it directly to your subwoofer enclosure. If it is under a seat you may just want to get some straps that hold it down.

  • 9

    Reconnect your car's negative cable to the battery. Test your system and make sure everything works, going around to see that every speaker is on before you put everything back together

  • Feb 17, 2011 | Car Audio & Video

    1 Answer

    I need to jumpstart and cant find the battery...


    The battery should be on the right hand side of the car, in the engine compartment, remember when you jump start it to hook up the jumper cables like this; negative jumper cable to negative battery terminal on your car, then positive jumper cable to positive terminal on your car, then, put the other positive jumper cable to the car that's jumper car and last connect the other negative jumper cable to the jumer cars engine block, and that should help you.

    Jan 16, 2011 | 1995 Chrysler Sebring

    1 Answer

    Where do i put the jumper cables to jumpstart my 96 xj6


    put the positive ( red ) cable to the positive (+) terminal on the battery and the negative (black) to the negative (-) on the battery and do the same with the other end of the jumper cables to the donner car/battery making sure you connect positve to positive first then negative to negative

    Oct 26, 2009 | 1996 Jaguar Xj Series

    2 Answers

    Battery wiring


    Series or paralell?. Should be parallel so you get 12 v0lts. two positives together and two negatives together

    Sep 26, 2009 | 2001 Toyota Land Cruiser

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    The fuse in the red wire that connects to the battery blows everytime i connect the negative and positive up 2 my battery. it blows when i dont even have the red chord hooked up 2 the amp. whats the...


    Hello super11dt,

    Sounds like the power and ground wire are shorting. Check the power wire with a multimeter. Sometimes, the insulation gets rubbed off and it contacts the vehicle metal causing a short. The solution is to pull a new wire and install a grommet or bushing wherever it goes through the firewall.

    Actually, the negative (ground) wire should not be run to the battery at all. It should be secured to the metal of the vehicle as close to the amp as you can get, preferably within about 3 feet.

    Hope this helps.

    May 13, 2009 | Directed Extreme XA-5001 150W x 1 Car Amp...

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    How do i set this up in my home


    What is the REM (remote I assume). The second hot wire other than the red is usually yellow. Is your REM wire yellow. Also, don't forget to put a fuse in the "positive" side of the circuit. Keever

    Mar 03, 2008 | Bazooka EL2150 Car Audio Amplifier

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