Question about 2002 Yamaha YZF 600 R thunder cat

1 Answer

I have an 04 thundercat and the charging voltage at the battery is only about 12.2 vdc what voltage should i have coming out of the stator before regulator

Slowly drains battery

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  • Yamaha Master
  • 57,017 Answers

Hi, Kenneth the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
http://www.thundercat.nl/index.php/download/category/2-manuals
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA YZF600R Owner Manual
YAMAHA YZF600R Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

Posted on Feb 20, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 yamaha r6 keeps going dead! Stator,regulator or something?

you need to check for a short if its not that then it could be your altinator or a regulator box

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

  • 492 Answers

SOURCE: 97 gixxer 750, will not start. Starts fill with

Your charger should be putting out 13.0-14.5 volts to keep the battery charged. Otherwise its running off the stator sometimes and the battery at other times depleating the battery. The voltage regulator could be bad or the stator could be bad. try swapping the volt regulator first and start from there. Also a battery that has been depleted should be sufficiently recharged before using it again.

Posted on Apr 30, 2009

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: I replaced my stator on my 1983 650 silver wing interstate

Where did you get the stator?? If not factory... You might want to us a volt meter and measure the resistance. You can find the resistance specs in its honda service manual. Give some more info!!

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

  • 221 Answers

SOURCE: wire connector between stator & voltage reg/rectifier burnt

your voltage/reg. can be tested in a couple different ways check ground res. check res. then revs. bias on diodes you have ac in dc out it sounds like you may have a diode gone bad allowing ac curent to flow causing the wires to get hot

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

  • 66 Answers

SOURCE: my battery is not charging when bike is running (gsxr 600 k6 )

When you put a voltmeter across the battery terminals, you should get >13.5V (typically) with the engine running. 
If less than this then your charging system is faulty and your battery will not charge. 
See this personally authored thread for a diagnostic guide on how to determine whether you have a problem with your stator or Rectifier/Regulator - inlcuding some cold resistance checks you can do on the R/R to determine if it is shorted. 
[url]http://www.triumphrat.net/speed-triple-forum/104504-charging-system-diagnostics-rectifier-regulator-upgrade.html[/url]
It was written initially for Triumphs, but applies to ANY 3-phase motorcycle charging system. 

Posted on Aug 15, 2009

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1 Answer

The rectifier is ok but voltage is 8.5v ac on kymco 500i., wher is the expication?


12 volt battery should be 12-13.2 volts dc normal and 14.5-14.8 vdc at rpms if you only get 8.5 vdc then the charge system ( alternator /stator)is not working or the voltage regulator needs replacing

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Xantrex inverter error codes


This information expands upon the error code information contained in the Link 2000 Owner?s Manual.
E-01 Inverter high DC/Battery voltage shutdown Battery voltage has risen above 15.5 VDC for 12-volt models or 31 VDC for 24-volt models.
E-02 Inverter low DC/Battery voltage shutdown Battery voltage has dropped below 10 VDC for 12-volt units or 20 VDC for 24-volt units.
E-03 Inverter or Charger overtemp shutdown Unit will reset automatically after it has cooled sufficiently.
E-04 Battery overload Caused by excessively discharged batteries. See section in inverter owner?s manual titled ?Charging overdischarged batteries.?
E-05 AC Backfeed AC power from an outside source has been fed to the AC output of the inverter. Potentially damaging to the unit. Disconnect incoming AC power and correct the situation.
E-06 Electronic Overload Inverter overload caused by too large a load or a short circuit. Reset by cycling power switch or connecting incoming AC power.
E-07 Triac control error Triac has overheated. Shut down unit and allow to cool.
E-08 High battery voltage shutdown during charge mode Check all charging sources for proper voltage. Reset by cycling the power switch.
E-09 Spare
E-10 Link 2000 de-powered This indicates that power was removed and restored to the Link 2000.
E-11 Spare
E-12 Battery #1 voltage sense leads open Blue wire is not connected to battery #1.
E-13 Battery #2 voltage sense leads open Violet wire is not connected to battery #2. E-14 Inappropriate Charged V selected for sensed voltage This value defaults to 13.2 for a 12-volt system, 26.4 for a 24-volt system. If this setting is above the voltage limits of the charging source, this error code will be displayed. Please refer to page 9 of the Link 2000 Owner?s Manual
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Tip

How To Test The CHarging System On Your Late Model Harley-Davidson.


Use a digital voltmeter for best results, I personally like the Fluke brand of meters as they are simple to use and a very high quality tool. With the motorcycle turned off to start with. Set your meter to VDC and place your probes across the battery posts(if your memory is bad write these numbers down). If your battery is fully charged you should see between 12.2 and 13.5 VDC on the meter. Now again in VDC start the motorcycle and note the readings on the meter with the bike idling again you should see around 12.2 and 13.5 VDC slightly increase the throttle speed you should see the reading increase to between 13.5 and 14.5 VDC if this is the case your charging system is working, if you see more then 14.8 to 15 VDC with the bike running around 2000 RPM you have a voltage regulator problem and it needs to be replaced. If you see only battery voltage(meaning no increase from what your reading was with the bike off) you can have a multitude of issues happening.
1) stator could be bad
2) voltage regulator could be bad
3) battery could be faulty
4) you could even have a poor ground
First thing to check would be that your battery connections are tight and clean. Also check all the ground connections I.E The opposite end of the ground cable, also check to make sure that your voltage regulator is bolted tightly to the frame and that the ground connections is clean and free of paint(paint can inhibit a good quality ground).
Second and from my experience in Harley-Davidson this is the most common issue with HD charging systems. Its called a grounded stator. meaning that you have an unwanted ground. Set your meter to Continuity preferablly on an audible setting that will beep when you continuity.
On the left side of the bike as if you were sitting on it at the front of the primary case you will see a plug going into the primary case, this is where your stator is housed and of course we all know electrics and liquids dont mix but HD puts the two together and due to it your HD is destined to use up stators over the years.
With the key off disconnect this plug, now again in continutity,first touch your meter probes together you should hear a tone or beep. now touch one meter lead to any good ground honestly anyone of the primary case bolts should be sufficent then put your other meter lead in either of the 2 holes of the stator plug where it comes out of the primary case. If you get a tone you have a grounded stator and it needs to be replaced. This condition can exsist even if the charging system is still charging so always check for this.
Now on to testing your voltage regulator since we already have it unplugged at the stator(the plug that connects to the stator plug runs back to the voltage regulator. Follow this plugs wiring back to the voltage regulator and find the single wire that runs back to the battery or to the main circuit breaker and then to the battery. disconnect this single wire at the breaker if thats where it goes first. If it goes direct to the positive side of the battery then disconnect it there.
This time in Ohms place one meter lead on the end of the single wire and the other meter lead on either one of the pins that would normal connection to the stator. Note your reading, as a rule it shouldnt be more then 1 - 2 Ohms of resistance through any wire.
From my experience and I have done alot of charging systems for HD over the years.
First thing to go is usually the stator, when the stator goes it usually kills the voltage regulator if not taken care of right away. There is also a test for output from the stator to the voltage regulator and this is checked with all your connections tight and clean. Make sure everything is connected with the exception of the stator plug to the voltage regulator at the primary case.
Now this time your meter needs to be in VAC notice that is Volts AC for this test. You might want a friend to hold the throttle for you during this test. now place each of your meter leads in the plug coming out of the primary case(stator) start the bike up and you should see at an idle around 16 - 19 VAC if you increase the rpms you should see this reading increase as well around 17 VAC per 1000 RPMs so if your holding at 3000 RPMs you should see 50 VAC. If your getting anything below around 40 VAC at 3000 RPMs your stator is not putting out a sufficent amount of voltage and needs to be replaced. When I see this particular condition I always replace the stator and voltage regulator both as there is a good chance the voltage regulator has been spiked or over worked and will fail shortly.
Just to wrap this tip up let me say that before you attempt to change your stator or anything electrical really disconnect the battery first. The fingers you save maybe your own. I hope this helps anyone that may read it even a little bit. Good luck and thanks for using FixYa.com


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1 Answer

Great dane Chariot mower GDRZ25KHE


If this is a briggs engine, depending on the type of charging circuit it has, the AC voltage from the stator under the flywheel should be around 28 to 30 VAC and the DC Voltage coming out of the voltage regulator with it disconnected should be around 14 VDC.. If the voltage is lower than 28VAC from the stator then it is a bad stator. If the stator voltage is good and the regulator is putting out less than 13 to 14VDC that the regulator is bad.

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Two batteries drained while riding. battery light and engine light come on then go off. when i go to start it it just clicks and will not turn over. using a HD battery tender. could it be a fuse,...


more likely it's the stator. with a fully charged battery, check with a meter on dc, battery shold be around 12.7 to 13 vdc. start bike should jump up to around 15 vdc. if it dosen't, statot is bad, if it does or goes much higher, regulator is bad. also check that nothing is touching on terminals of battery when running, like frame or other metal parts, that could drain a battery also.

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Hello,
My name is Dane and I'll try to help you with your problem. Unless you have an electric PTO for your deck engaugement, almost all mowers produce their voltage just due to the number and size of the windings of the stator, which is under the flywheel. Normally you are either producing a charging voltage or not. If there's any doubt though, you can check your voltage at the battery. For a normally charged battery I see about 12 to 12.3 VDC. Now when you start the engine that should go up to somewhere between 13.5 to 15.5 VDC. If you are somewhere close to that, you're fine. I would think that your problem lies on the other end though. I think you are getting a draw of power that is exceeding the amperage of the fuse. You should check your wiring for any frayed wiring where you are getting a direct short to ground. Maybe the seat is hitting your battery if it's under the seat. If you have an electric PTO, that can be your problem. It may be going bad. Also a bad starter can cause that kind of draw. If the starter turns slow with a fully charged battery, maybe.
I hope I've given you enough information to go get a fix for your problem.
Thanks! Dane

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2 Answers

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Hi and welcome to FixYA,

Two possibilities:
  • rectifier / regulator combo (most likely);
  • corroded, burned, loose connection from the stator to the regulator (likely);
  • faulty stator (least likely).
The stator would be producing relatively high AC voltage while revving the bike. The stator output AC voltage are fed to the rectifier / regulator through 3 white wires. Check calls for testiing for the presence of the AC voltage on any pairing of the white wires before and after the connector before the voltage regulator. Check on the regulator calls for checking the battery voltage when revving the bike (14.5 VDC).

Good luck and thank you for asking FixYa.

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1 Answer

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the best place to start is at the battery. with the battery fully charged and connected to the bike. get a voltmeter and in vdc place your meter leads on the battery terminals with the bike off. you should have 12.5-13.0 vdc. now start the bike with the meter leads on the battery terminals and the bike idling you should see around 13 vdc and when you increase the engine rpm you should see as high as 14.5 vdc if you see more then 15vdc you have a bad voltage regulator and if you see less then battery voltage from the first test, then it stands to reason that you have a bad stator. good luck and let me know what you find

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Here is a few tests you can run. First with the bike off take a multimeter in VDC check the battery voltage at the battery. (should be at 12.5 VDC) If not first charge the battery. Second start the bike, with it running and multimeter again in VDC check voltage at the battery while slowly opening the throttle(should see between 13.2 and 14.5 VDC at the battery) If you have more then 15 VDC then you have a bad voltage regulator. If you have less then battery voltage from the first test. You may have a bad stator and/or a bad voltage regulator. Third test with bike turned off and multimeter in continuity. Place one meter lead into either of the two holes for your stator lead(coming out of the front of the primary drive case) the other meter lead to any good ground. If you get a tone or continuity then you have a grounded stator, and it has to be replaced before proceding any further with charging system tests. If you do NOT have continuity then check the wires from the voltage regulator running back to the battery for any breaks or chaffing, if none are found. I would have the battery load tested as well.Good Luck and thanks for usinf Fixya.com Let me know what you find please.

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1 Answer

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I definately would think it is something within the charging system. Here is a few tests you can run. First with the bike off take a multimeter in VDC check the battery voltage at the battery. (should be at 12.5 VDC) If not first charge the battery. Second start the bike, with it running and multimeter again in VDC check voltage at the battery while slowly opening the throttle(should see between 13.2 and 14.5 VDC at the battery) If you have more then 15 VDC then you have a bad voltage regulator. If you have less then battery voltage from the first test. You may have a bad stator and/or a bad voltage regulator. Third test with bike turned off and multimeter in continuity. Place one meter lead into either of the two holes for your stator lead(coming out of the front of the primary drive case) the other meter lead to any good ground. If you get a tone or continuity then you have a grounded stator, and it has to be replaced before proceding any further with charging system tests. If you do NOT have continuity then check the wires from the voltage regulator running back to the battery for any breaks or chaffing, if none are found. I would have the battery load tested as well. It also sounds like you could have a short in the turn signal wiring, maybe check the wiring inside the rear fender for chaffing as well. I personally think you'll find its an issue with the charging system itself though. Good luck and please let me know what you find out.

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