20 Most Recent 2000 Yamaha V Star 1100 Custom Questions & Answers


Hi, Kirk it should be noted that the reasons your check engine light or CEL stays on constantly or flashes and your bike will or will not start and may turnover or not, these conditions will vary from bike to bike depending on the year, make, and model and you should always refer to your owners/service manual for proper diagnostic procedures. It should also be noted that any type of prior work done to the bike or an abnormal event occurrence IE: adding accessories, electrical curiosity or adventures, laying the bike down or crashes, rainstorms or bike washings just before CEL light issues started can be significant hints or aids into tracking down the gremlin, also for 2003 and older models carry the appropriate jumper wire to access fault codes and reduce the risk of being stranded or towed also keep in mind that your CEL comes to life if anything, and I do mean anything isn't 100% with the ECM like parameter spikes. This means that you could be staring at a major repair, or your speedometer sensor is contaminated and needs to be cleaned.
And the usual suspects are:
1. Severely discharged or a damaged battery check the terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary, you should have 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage the battery is faulty and must be replaced, AGM batteries fail in this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
2. Faulty charging system.
3. Faulty system sensor some models have up to 40 sensors
4. Faulty safety switches: run/off, ignition, clutch lever, neutral, side stand, tip over, fuel, and or their connections.
5. The engine got wet where it didn't like to get wet.
6. Faulty ignition circuit spark plugs, coils, cables etc.
7. Broken wire or worn insulation exposing wire to a ground situation especially inside wire harness at tight bends around fairing brackets, under dash panels, under fuel tanks over cylinder heads etc. Many harnesses are open on the ends that will allow water to enter and accumulate at v-bends.
Dielectric grease and contact cleaner are your best friends for wire/cable/harness connectors, look for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets. Run speedometer diagnostics and check for generated fault codes.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
07 650 star check engine light
Yamaha Fault Codes
https://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/V-StarShopManual99-07.pdf
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-yamaha
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/612321/Yamaha-Xvs1100.html#product-DRAG%20STAR%20XVS1100A

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 19, 2019


Hi, Norman before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. To check the regulator unplug it from the stator. Take a test light and clip it to the negative terminal of the battery and then touch first one pin and then the other on the plug that goes to the regulator. If you get even the slightest amount of light from the test light the regulator is toast.
To do this with a meter: black lead to battery ground, red lead to each pin on the plug, start with the voltage scale higher than 12vdc and move voltage scale down in steps for each pin. Any voltage is a bad regulator.
3. On the other part of the disconnected regulator plug. Set the multimeter for Ohms x1 scale and measure for resistance across the pins of the stator. You should read something around 0.1 to 0.2 ohms for a 32 amp system.
4. Then check for continuity between each pin on the plug and frame/engine ground. The meter needle should not move (infinite resistance)(digitals will show infinite resistance) if the meter needle does move (indicating continuity)(digitals will show some resistance), recheck very carefully. If the meter still shows continuity to ground the stator is shorted (bad).
5. Set the meter to read A/C volts higher than 30 volts (the scale setting for voltage should always be higher than the highest voltage you expect or you may fry the meter). Start the bike, and measure from one pin to the other on the plug (DO NOT cross the multimeter probes! - touch them to each other). You should read roughly 16-20 vac per 1,000 rpm.
6. If the battery was good under load test, if the stator is NOT shorted to ground, and the stator is putting out A/C voltage, then the regulator is bad (most likely even if passed step 2)
For more information about your question and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/821-2002-vstar-1100-charging-problem.html
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/VS-1100-chagre-syst.pdf
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Nov 12, 2017


Hi, Billschmidt4 for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Oil Filters Star 1100 Wiki Knowledge Base
Yamaha Star 1100 Complete Oil and Filter Change Best Quality
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 13, 2017


Hi, Zenon I would love to help you with your engine or chassis noise but I just loaned my brand new pair of listening ears to your local dealer's chief technician so he could take your bike for a test ride and give you his professional opinion and estimate about your noise and repair cost. If you are a little short on "DRACHMA" and a Dealership is not on your list of fun places to visit then perhaps the list below will help soothe your worried mind so you can make an informed decision.
1. Bearings---SCREECH
2. Belts---CHIRP
3. Brake Rotors---BUZZ
4. Chains---RATTLE
5. Clutches---CHATTER
6. Cylinders---PING
7. Fronk Forks---Plunk
8. Gears---WHINE
9. Head Gasket---HISS
10. Hydraulic Lifters---TAP
11. Pistons---SLAP
12. Rear Shocks---SQUEAK
13. Shifting Trans---CLUNK
14. Solid Lifters---TICK
15. Starters---CLICK
16. Connecting Rods Go---KNOCK-KNOCK---who's there, it's me "*****"
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Motorcycle Message Board Motorcycle USA
How to diagnose problem by the noises your bike makes
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 08, 2017


Hi, Blair and the usual suspects are:
1. Enrichner system plugged, not properly functioning or improperly operated.
2. Fuel overflow line pinched or clogged.
3. Restricted fuel supply.
4. Gas cap and or fuel tank not venting properly.
5. Plugged slow jet or passages.
6. Inlet system air leak.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/839-2000-vstar-1100-custom-hard-start.html
https://sites.google.com/site/vstar1100kb/home/new-owner-must-do-list/using-the-choke
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/V-StarShopManual99-07.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Apr 21, 2017


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System Circuit it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amps causing the battery to be faulty and must be replaced, especially "AGM" batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
VStar charging problem
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/VS-1100-chagre-syst.pdf
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Apr 04, 2017


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.motorcycleforum.com/97-yamaha/94508-charging-issue-my-v-star-1100-a.html
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Feb 01, 2017


Hi, Karl and the usual suspects are:
1. Ignition Switch not in the "ON" position.
2. Engine Run Switch in the "OFF" position.
3. Discharged battery, needs to be 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
4. Check the battery terminals for damage or corrosion check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
5. Tip over sensor needs a reset.
6. Faulty ignition switch.
7. Faulty starter button.
8. Faulty kickstand or clutch pull in switch/sensor.
9. Starter control circuit, relay, or solenoid faulty.
10. Main fuse or circuit breaker may be blown or faulty.
11. Check for engine trouble codes.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have nice a day.
Re My Yahama Star 1100 wont start Road Star Forum Yamaha Road Star
Scooter Troubleshooting Scooter won start All about Scooters
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/V-StarShopManual99-07.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/V-StarOwner%20Manual.pdf

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Jan 07, 2017


Hi, Anonymous and the usual suspects are:
1. Throttle cables misaligned or misrouted.
2. Damaged or restricted fuel tank venting system.
3. Intake system air leak.
4. Vacuum piston malfunction.
5. Pinholes or torn diaphragm.
6. Accelerator pump leaking or no output.
7. Plugged bowl vent or overflow.
8. Fuel level in bowl too low.
9. Restricted fuel supply passages.
10. Plugged jets or passages.
11. Worn or damaged needle or needle jet.
12. The enrichner valve not seated or leaking.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
http://forums.cycleworld.com/showthread.php?t=169267
totalmotorcycle com

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Dec 06, 2016


Hi, Anonymous and the usual suspects are:
1. Throttle cables misaligned or misrouted.
2. Damaged or restricted fuel tank venting system.
3. Intake system air leak.
4. Vacuum piston malfunction.
5. Pinholes or torn diaphragm.
6. Accelerator pump leaking or no output.
7. Plugged bowl vent or overflow.
8. Fuel level in bowl too low.
9. Restricted fuel supply passages.
10. Plugged jets or passages.
11. Worn or damaged needle or needle jet.
12. The enrichner valve not seated or leaking.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
totalmotorcycle com
http://forums.cycleworld.com/showthread.php?t=169267
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Dec 06, 2016


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/5320-touchy-rear-brake.html
Yamaha XVS650 Rear Brake Lever Height Adjustment
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/V-StarShopManual99-07.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.starmotorcycles.com/assets/service/manuals/2000/LIT-11626-13-36_96.pdf

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Oct 10, 2016


i would try a lower octane first . and if possible try to get marine fuel. with no ethanol in it .its just normal gas like we use to have before .Anyway that bike was not meant for the fuel of today. this is a common problem with older bikes and smaller engines . see if the sound goes away after that . if not you may have a serious problem .

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Nov 05, 2013


Hook a jumper cable from the negative battery post to any grounding point on the starter and try starting. If it starts then the problem is in your ground. Remove and clean both ends of the cable as well as the spot they connect to. Reinstall ground cable and try starting. Hope this helps

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 27, 2011


It could just be a spark plug if its not turning over. Have a mechanic look at the starter before you spend more money than you have to.

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 27, 2011


Looking at the dragstar 100 maunal, there doesn't appear to be a starter clutch.
Maybe you mean the pre engage starter dog is not engaging. The manual just tell one to replace the motor. I would remove the starter, clean and lubricate the dog and bearing then put it back in as that usually fixes it.

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Jan 20, 2011


Could be a starter issue, or a wiring issue. Check for power at the starter when the button is pressed. If you have power, you need a starter, if not, trouble shoot the electrical system.

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Nov 20, 2010


So the new battery has a full charge and you checked right?
And if everything was OK last year, I would suspect a bad battery cable or ground strap from the battery. Check all the connections to make sure all are good. Remove any corrosion if present. I have seen car battery cable corrode internally which will give fits trying to diagnose the issue.

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Jun 09, 2010


Could be, or maybe the gas is off or filter clogged. I'm not kidding or being smart. Remember it's either gas, spark or air.

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 23, 2010


back fire,bogs down and choke required means it is lean.
Check fuel filter, fuel tap
intake air leaks, loose clamps, cracked rubber
vacumn hose off
valve clearance
loose jets in carb \dirt in carbs
part of a carb coming loose , like the top cap

The back fire can be because of carbon fouled plugs, caused by the choke on.
air intake leaks can sometimes be found by spraying WD around intake rubbers,while running and listening for engine change.
The rest is mainly visual inspection and adjusmnet

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on May 07, 2010


did you try to push start it? sounds like a bad starter

2000 Yamaha V... | Answered on Mar 29, 2010

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