20 Most Recent 2008 kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Questions & Answers


Hi, White_rab94 for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Kawasaki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
900 Custom Tire Pressure Kawasaki Vulcan Forum Vulcan Forums
https://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/74038-tire-pressure-vn900-custom.html
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic Owner Manual

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Sep 08, 2018


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Kawasaki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom wiring diagram Google Search
Kawasaki Motorcycle Wiring Diagrams
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Owner Manual

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Sep 04, 2018


Hi, Jack for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Kawasaki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom fuel pump relay location Google Search
http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/71734-fuel-pump-problem-vulcan-900-a.html
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Jun 26, 2018


Hi, Jinger engine "BOG" is mainly caused by a rich air and lean fuel condition but it can also be caused by a lean air and rich fuel condition this situation rarely occurs and is only caused by the misinformed weekend warrior that owns a toolbox. If the bike has been sitting for months or years you will have to completely disassemble the carburetor and submerge the parts (except rubber parts) in "Carburetor Dip" It usually comes in a gallon bucket with a wire mesh basket that can be purchased at any automotive store. If it is not the above scenario then the following explanation will apply.
The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air that leaks into your system can become more obvious.
Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you have unmetered air getting into your system between the butterfly/slide of the carburetor and the cylinder head this will create a lean condition.
All of the rubber components of the fuel system like vacuum hoses and intake manifold that you mount the carburetor to are made of rubber. If none of these components have been changed they are more than likely highly degraded and probably cracked in places to allow unwanted-unmetered-contaminated air into the combustion chamber. Check all of your vacuum lines and vacuum plugs for carburetor synchronization. The vacuum plugs are in the head just after the rubber intake manifolds. The petcock has a vacuum line as well as part of the emission system.
1. Check the intake manifold for fissures.
2. Ensure the bands used to tighten the manifolds down on the intake are secure and have not bound up the manifold.
3. Make sure air box fittings are not warped and fit completely over the carburetor.
Your airbox is metering air and is the first step in a process of consuming air and fuel. The system requires the resistance of the air filter in order to get the proper vacuum to "SUCK" the fuel out of the float bowl and create the proper venturi effect.
Improper mounting and sealing of the airbox will create a small lean effect. This might seem like no big deal but you are inviting dust and debris in your engine that is doing slow damage by not having proper fitment. Fix it so you know it's not contributing to your issue. Pick the low-hanging fruit first.
Do not go and start adjusting anything at this point. It ran fine before. There is something wrong with the assembly or a component. Do not adjust your floats. Get it back to where it was. The moment you start tweaking everything is the moment you lose OEM settings which are a must-have for fine-tuning and maximum performance.
Fine-tuning your carburetor and multi carb syncing come at the very end following the proper procedure established by the Carburetor Gods.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
09 Vulcan 900 Custom SE Bogging under acceleration Kawasaki Vulcan Forum...
2007 900 Classic LT Bogging Down What Up With That Kawasaki Motorcycle...
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on May 07, 2018


Hi, Anonymous it should be noted that the reasons your FI light stays on constantly or flashes and your bike will or will not start and may turn over or not, these conditions will vary from bike to bike depending on the year, make, and model and you should always refer to your owners/service manual for proper diagnostic procedures. It should also be noted that any type of prior work done to the bike or an abnormal event occurrence IE: adding accessories, electrical curiosity/adventures, laying the bike down/crashes, rain storms/bike washings just before FI light issues started can be significant hints/aids into tracking down the gremlin. The newer the bike the more sensitive the ECM becomes and will not let the bike start when aftermarket accessories have been installed without being reprogrammed. That being said the usual suspects are:
1. Faulty Fuel Pump, fuse or system relay switch.
2. Battery starting to fail due to old age/damage, perform a load test.
3. A discharged battery, check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
4. Faulty safety switches/sensors: run/off, ignition, clutch lever, neutral, side stand, tip over, fuel, and or their connections.
5. Broken wire or worn insulation exposing wire to a ground situation especially inside wire harness at tight bends around fairing brackets, under dash panels, under fuel tanks over cylinder heads etc. Many harnesses are open on the ends that will allow water to enter and accumulate at v-bends.
Dielectric grease and contact cleaner are your best friends for wire/cable/harness connectors, look for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets.
6. Installation of aftermarket accessories ie. exhaust systems, mufflers, air cleaners, fuel tuners, electrical component etc.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
FI light coming Kawasaki Vulcan Forum Vulcan Forums
http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/66838-vn900-fi-light.html
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Apr 26, 2018


Hi, Anonymous engine "BOG" is mainly caused by a rich air and lean fuel condition but it can also be caused by a lean air and rich fuel condition this situation rarely occurs and is only caused by the misinformed weekend warrior that owns a toolbox. If the bike has been sitting for months or years you will have to completely disassemble the carburetor and submerge the parts (except rubber parts) in "Carburetor Dip" It usually comes in a gallon bucket with a wire mesh basket that can be purchased at any automotive store. If it is not the above scenario then the following explanation will apply.
The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air that leaks into your system can become more obvious.
Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you have unmetered air getting into your system between the butterfly/slide of the carburetor and the cylinder head this will create a lean condition.
All of the rubber components of the fuel system like vacuum hoses and intake manifold that you mount the carburetor to are made of rubber. If none of these components have been changed they are more than likely highly degraded and probably cracked in places to allow unwanted-unmetered-contaminated air into the combustion chamber. Check all of your vacuum lines and vacuum plugs for carburetor synchronization. The vacuum plugs are in the head just after the rubber intake manifolds. The petcock has a vacuum line as well as part of the emission system.
1. Check the intake manifold for fissures.
2. Ensure the bands used to tighten the manifolds down on the intake are secure and have not bound up the manifold.
3. Make sure air box fittings are not warped and fit completely over the carburetor.
Your airbox is metering air and is the first step in a process of consuming air and fuel. The system requires the resistance of the air filter in order to get the proper vacuum to "SUCK" the fuel out of the float bowl and create the proper venturi effect.
Improper mounting and sealing of the airbox will create a small lean effect. This might seem like no big deal but you are inviting dust and debris in your engine that is doing slow damage by not having proper fitment. Fix it so you know it's not contributing to your issue. Pick the low-hanging fruit first.
Do not go and start adjusting anything at this point. It ran fine before. There is something wrong with the assembly or a component. Do not adjust your floats. Get it back to where it was. The moment you start tweaking everything is the moment you lose OEM settings which are a must-have for fine-tuning and maximum performance.
Fine-tuning your carburetor and multi carb syncing come at the very end following the proper procedure established by the Carburetor Gods.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
09 Vulcan 900 Custom SE Bogging under acceleration Kawasaki Vulcan Forum...
2007 900 Classic LT Bogging Down What Up With That Kawasaki Motorcycle...
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
Kawasaki vulcan 900 custom Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Apr 20, 2018


Hi, Anonymous engine "BOG" is mainly caused by a rich air and lean fuel condition but it can also be caused by a lean air and rich fuel condition this situation rarely occurs and is only caused by the misinformed weekend warrior that owns a toolbox. If the bike has been sitting for months or years you will have to completely disassemble the carburetor and submerge the parts (except rubber parts) in "Carburetor Dip" It usually comes in a gallon bucket with a wire mesh basket that can be purchased at any automotive store. If it is not the above scenario then the following explanation will apply.
The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air that leaks into your system can become more obvious.
Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you have unmetered air getting into your system between the butterfly/slide of the carburetor and the cylinder head this will create a lean condition.
All of the rubber components of the fuel system like vacuum hoses and intake manifold that you mount the carburetor to are made of rubber. If none of these components have been changed they are more than likely highly degraded and probably cracked in places to allow unwanted-unmetered-contaminated air into the combustion chamber. Check all of your vacuum lines and vacuum plugs for carburetor synchronization. The vacuum plugs are in the head just after the rubber intake manifolds. The petcock has a vacuum line as well as part of the emission system.
1. Check the intake manifold for fissures.
2. Ensure the bands used to tighten the manifolds down on the intake are secure and have not bound up the manifold.
3. Make sure air box fittings are not warped and fit completely over the carburetor.
Your airbox is metering air and is the first step in a process of consuming air and fuel. The system requires the resistance of the air filter in order to get the proper vacuum to "SUCK" the fuel out of the float bowl and create the proper venturi effect.
Improper mounting and sealing of the airbox will create a small lean effect. This might seem like no big deal but you are inviting dust and debris in your engine that is doing slow damage by not having proper fitment. Fix it so you know it's not contributing to your issue. Pick the low-hanging fruit first.
Do not go and start adjusting anything at this point. It ran fine before. There is something wrong with the assembly or a component. Do not adjust your floats. Get it back to where it was. The moment you start tweaking everything is the moment you lose OEM settings which are a must-have for fine-tuning and maximum performance.
Fine-tuning your carburetor and multi carb syncing come at the very end following the proper procedure established by the Carburetor Gods.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
900 custom bogging down Kawasaki Vulcan Forum Vulcan Forums
2007 900 Classic LT Bogging Down What Up With That Kawasaki Motorcycle...
KAWASAKI VN900 CLASSIC Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
Kawasaki vulcan 900 custom Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Apr 10, 2018


Hi, Jack for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Kawasaki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom wiring diagram Google Search
Kawasaki Motorcycle Wiring Diagrams
Kawasaki VN900 Custom Service Manual
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Mar 15, 2018


Could be an electronic problem, immobiliser for instance, or it could be the starter motor has become temperature sensitive.

I suggest you check the supply to the motor when it won't start and double check by providing the motor with an independent supply. Shorting the solenoid if it is accessible will take final diagnosis another step further and then independently energising the solenoid a step furth still.

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Jan 04, 2016


Hi, Freerick the following applies to carbureted also fuel injected models and the usual suspects are:
1. Severely discharged or damaged battery, 9 volts or lower.
2. Failed alternator/generator and or voltage regulator.
3. Loose or corroded battery terminals and or cables especially the "NEGATIVE" cable, look for loose, corroded, or broken connectors inside the cable harness at "BOTH" ends.
4. Failed main circuit breaker or ignition switch, check for loose connections and continuity.
5. Failed system and or ignition relay, check for continuity.
6. Failed ignition coil, ignition/electronic module.
7. Failed CKP, CPS, CMP, MAP, TPS, or BAS sensor, corroded, loose or broken wire connector pins/sockets.
8. Throttle cables and or idle speed improperly adjusted hot idle speed should be 950 RPM to 1000 RPM.
9. Air/fuel mixture screw improperly adjusted.
10. Water or dirt in the fuel system, carburetor or filter.
11. Restricted, blocked or kinked fuel line.
12. Fuel tank empty.
13. Gas cap is not venting properly or fuel tank venting system blocked.
14. A failed fuel pump, pressure regulator and or fuel injectors.
15. Vacuum line from intake manifold to petcock broken, cracked, or not attached, carburetor vent line plugged.
16. Needle and seat stuck closed in the float bowl.
For more information about your issue, please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/146296-2008-vulcan-900-custom-hesitates-hard-acceleration-after-about-20-30-min-riding.html
2008 Vulcan 900 CUts out and shuts off HElp Kawasaki Vulcan Forum Vulcan...
https://www.vulcanrider.se/en/kawasaki-vulcan-service-manuals http://www.kawasaki-techinfo.net/index.php?view_lang=EN&spec=OC

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Jan 04, 2016


I don't have a manual for it but looking at the size of the forks I would say about 400ml of ten weight fork oil.

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Mar 22, 2015


Sounds like its your charging system, either the alternator or regulator/rectifier.

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Dec 28, 2013


Check the power at the ignition switch in all positions.

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Jul 04, 2013


The ignition switch has three positions. Off at 6 o'clock, on at about 7 o'clock and park at 9 o'clock which will leave the tail light on and also shut the bike off. Just have to make sure when you turn the ignition off that the key is straight up and down.

2008 kawasaki... | Answered on Mar 02, 2013


Hi, Derek I would really love to help you with your bike question but due to the magnitude of yesterday's solar flare the batteries in my crystal ball are dead and my mental telepathy headset circuitry was melted. I need the model of your motorcycle please click on the word "COMMENT" below and provide this information in the box that will open and then click on the green comment box in the bottom right-hand corner after it posts I will receive an "ALERT" icon that will allow me to respond to your information. Good luck and have a wonderful day.

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

kawasaki Vulcan... | Answered on Jul 05, 2017


Hi, John after you disconnect the battery, remove the starter solenoid cap and break away the contact plate from the shoes and clean/dress all electrical arc residue. In order to diagnose the starter circuit, you must start with a fully charged battery, 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test if necessary. The battery cables and terminals must be clean and tight. The "NEGATIVE" cable is famous for corroding and or breaking inside the harness, check the connectors at both ends. Check your starter relay with a test light for continuity, it could be faulty due to corrosion and sticking in a closed configuration, another claim to fame. Finally, there is the starter solenoid, low battery voltage or faulty battery connections will cause extremely high amperage at the plate and contact shoes and rob the hold in coils of much-needed voltage. In extreme cases, the solenoid plunger plate will literally weld itself to the contact shoes, keeping the circuit closed and thus permanent engagement. Another scenario is unacceptable voltage drop to the starter solenoid from the ignition switch to the starter relay to the starter button, and finally to the solenoid. Remove the green wire from the starter solenoid and hook up the positive lead of your voltmeter to the green wire connector and ground the negative lead. Turn on the ignition switch and depress starter button, the voltage reading should be no more than .5 volt less than the battery voltage. If it is more than .5 volt you need to backtrack that part of the circuit with your voltmeter until you find the voltage robbing offender. Next, remove the 3 screws that secure the solenoid cover and remove the plunger, dress the plate and the contact shoes of arching residue and make sure the contact shoes are tight and secure. If you have done all of the above, replace the green starter button wire, hook up your voltmeter to the battery and check the voltage drop when you start the engine, anything below 9 volts could indicate a faulty battery and a proper load test should be performed. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Starter Won Disengage
http://www2.vulcanrider.se/DL/VN900CF.pdf
OEM Parts for Kawasaki
http://mybikemanuals.com/kawasaki/kawasaki-vulcan-owners-manuals

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

kawasaki Vulcan... | Answered on Jul 21, 2016


not damaged...but will need it's jets cleaning out

kawasaki Vulcan... | Answered on Aug 13, 2014


YOU CAN FIND THESE AT YOUR LOCAL CAR SCRAP YARD FOR LIKE $1.00,

OR DO A SEARCH ON THE COMPUTER ENTERING NAME AND MODEL MANUAL,

YOU MAY FIND OUT MORE THAN YOUY WANT THIS WAY, BUT YOU MAY FIND THE MANUFACTURER CONTACT INFORMATION, TO CALL...AND HAVE THEM EMAIL YOU THE SPEC'S YOU NEED!

HOPE THIS HELPS!

kawasaki Vulcan... | Answered on Aug 31, 2011


sounds like internal engine damage. what is the oil level, condition?
sounds as though maybe loosing oil pressure or flow. have you tried to change oil and filter? filters might be clogging up.
www.repairmanualclub.com

kawasaki Vulcan... | Answered on Jun 04, 2011


Hi, Ryan and the usual suspects are:
1. Severely discharged or a damaged battery, should have 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a "LOAD" test "WARNING" you can have 12.5 volts or better but little or zero amps and the battery must be replaced.
2. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
3. Faulty main circuit breaker and or connections.
4. Faulty ignition coil and or connections.
5. Faulty spark plug, oil or gas fouled, wrong heat range or service type, wrong gap, loose in the cylinder head, broken electrode or insulator.
6. Faulty spark plug cables, leaking or broken, internal damage check for spark leakage in the dark.
7. Faulty ignition module, switch, CKP, MAP, CMP, sensor and or any connector in the ignition circuit could have corroded, loose, or broken pins/sockets
8. Burnt exhaust valve or air leak in the exhaust system.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Kawasaki rouser 180 help
Preventing Backfire on Motorcycle Exhausts DoItYourself com
Kawasaki Motors Philippines Commuter Bikes
Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTSi Workshop Manual
http://ondoc.logand.com/d/1735/pdf

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

kawasaki... | Answered 9 hours ago

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