Question about 2004 GMC Envoy SLT

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Where can i go online and find a wiring diagrams 2004 GMC Envoy SLT 4.2L engine controls 1 of 4?

I need to know which wires is the signal that connect to the crankshaft position sensor and the signal wire that connect to the coils and camshaft position sensor i can use a test light to check for a signal.

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How do replace ignition control module in 1998 K-1500 5.0 liter vortec


This system does not use the ignition module used on the DI systems in the past. The VCM controller now controls the ignition control (IC) and bypass functions.
The crankshaft sensor, located in the front engine cover, is perpendicular to a target wheel attached to the crankshaft. The target wheel is equipped with slots situated 60 degrees apart. As the crankshaft rotates, the target wheel rotates past the crankshaft position sensor. The rising and falling edges created by the slots cause a signal to be sent back to the VCM. This signal occurs three times per crankshaft revolution and is referred to as the 3x signal for V6 applications. The signal occurs four times per crankshaft revolution and is referred to as the 4x signal for V8 applications.
The VCM then utilizes this 3x (V6) or 4x (V8) signal in order to provide the correct spark to the engine by way of the single coil driver module. The single coil driver module is basically an electronic switch that when commanded by the VCM, causes the primary coil voltage to breakdown, energizing the secondary coil and providing a spark via the coil wire to the distributor cap. The distributor consists of the following components:
The system consists of the following components:
?€¢
Vehicle control module (VCM)


?€¢
Distributor


?€¢
Ignition coil driver module


?€¢
Ignition coil


?€¢
Crankshaft position (CKP) sensor


Now which part do you want to replace ?

?€¢
Cap and rotor


?€¢
Camshaft position sensor


?€¢
Gear drive and shaft

The camshaft drives the distributor shaft which rotates providing a spark to the correct cylinder by way of the cap and rotor. The camshaft position (CMP) sensor functions much like the crankshaft sensor previously described but provides only a 1x signal to the VCM. That is, for every 2 rotations of the crankshaft, there is 1 rotation of the camshaft. Note that the camshaft position sensor will not affect driveability. The sole purpose of the camshaft position sensor is to provide the VCM with the necessary information for the misfire diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs).

Sep 06, 2015 | 1998 Chevrolet K1500

3 Answers

My truck sonoma gmc 2001 dont past the emission test


Definition of Diagnostic Trouble Code P1345 Audi: Ignition Coil Power Output Stage 3 Short to Ground BMW: Misfire Cylinder 2 with Fuel Cut-Off Buick: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Cadillac: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Chevrolet: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Ford: Cylinder Discrimination Signal (Signal From Camshaft Position Sensor) GMC: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Isuzu: Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation Kia: No SGC Signal (1.6L) Lexus: Variable Valve Timing / CMP Sensor Range / Performance Lincoln: Cylinder Discrimination Signal (Signal From Camshaft Position Sensor) Mazda: Cylinder Discrimination Signal (from CMP sensor) Mercury: Cylinder Discrimination Signal (Signal From Camshaft Position Sensor) Oldsmobile: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Pontiac: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Saturn: Crankshaft Position (CKP)-Camshaft Position (CMP) Correlation Toyota: Variable Valve Timing / CMP Sensor Range / Performance Volkswagen: Ignition Coil Power Output Stage 3 Short to Ground

Jul 19, 2015 | GMC Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I've replaced everything to do with ignition spark on ky 1998 gmc pickup it has a 350 vortech engine why am I jot getting spark at the spark plugs ?


There is a spark control modal in the distributor most books do not tell you about it . if you have replaced everything else try that

Apr 19, 2015 | GMC Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2003 jeep grand cherokee. I dove my jeep last nigh had no problem this morning turns over but won't start. Used my code reader and got p0340 cam shaft sensor, replaced that and still having same...


DTC P0340 - Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Malfunction
This indicates that a problem was detected in the camshaft position sensor circuit. Since it says circuit, that means the problem could lie in any part of the circuit - the sensor itself, the wiring, or the PCM. Don't just replace the CPS (camshaft position sensor) and think that will definitely fix it.

Symptoms can include:
Hard starting or no start
Rough running / misfiring
Loss of engine power

A code P0340 could mean one or more of the following has happened:
a wire or connector in the circuit could be grounded/shorted/broken
the camshaft position sensor may have failed
the PCM may have failed
there exists an open circuit
the crankshaft position sensor may have failed


With a P0340 OBD-II trouble code, diagnosis can be tricky at times. Here are some things to try:
Visually inspect all the wiring and connectors in the circuit
Check for continuity in the circuit wiring
Check the operation (voltage) of the camshaft position sensor
Replace the camshaft position sensor as required
Check the crankshaft position circuit as well
Replace circuit wiring and/or connectors as required
Diagnose/replace the PCM as required


Monitor CMP sensor signal on a labscope looking for electrical noise that shows up on the pattern along with the CMP sensor Analog Current (AC) voltage sign wave signal.

Check timing belt alignment specific to the auxiliary shaft gear. There is a diamond on the gear that should align with a diamond on the rear belt cover just above the gear.

If electrical noise is present on the sensor signal, disconnect one coil pack at a time and disconnect the voltage regulator connection on the alternator to identify if the added electrical noise on the CMP signal pattern cleans up indicating the source of the electrical noise.

If no added electrical noise is present on the pattern and the timing gears are properly aligned, check the Dark Blue/Orange (DB/O) wire to verify it is not open between the sensor and PCM pin 85.

Also check the Grey/Red (GY/R) wire to verify it is providing a ground

In checking timing belt alignment, the auxiliary shaft sprocket has a diamond that should align with a diamond on the timing cover at the 12:00 position of the sprocket when the camshaft and crankshaft gears are at the top dead center position. If the Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor signal shows electrical noise on the labscope, disconnect the voltage regulator connection, and the coil packs individually to see if the electrical noise on the signal cleans up pinpointing the area of failure. If electrical noise cleans up when disconnecting a coil pack, remember that any of that pack's plug wires or the pack itself may be causing the noise.

Hope helps (remember to rate and comment this answer)..

Sep 05, 2011 | 2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

JEEP CODES P1391 AND P1398


p1391= crankshaft / camshaft position sensor intermitant signal, check, wiring, connections & sensors
p1398= engine control system missfire detection limit reached probable causes, wiring,poor connections,engine mechanical fault,ignition/fuel system fault (causing misfire) or camshaft/ crank shaft position sensor

Jun 04, 2010 | 1996 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


No-Start Diagnosis
The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

My car is not getting any spark from the coil


T COULD BE YOUR CAMSHAFT SENSOR OR CRANKSHAFT SENSOR. SOMETIMESTHE TIMING CHAIN JUMPS A TOOTH AND CAUSES THIS TO HAPPEN ASWELL.

1. At the coils, check for battery voltage at the Red wires while cranking, the Black wires should be less than 0.05 volts while cranking. Pin 3 at the coils (each wire color at the #3 pin are different) using a scope watch for a 3 - 4 volt pulse signal while cranking. Red wire - battery voltage, Black wire is a ground and the White wire is the signal circuit

2. If there is no pulse signal to the power transistors, using a scanner check the POS counts (Position) should be 179 - 181 while cranking. If inconsistent, check the signal plate (flywheel/flex plate) for damaged teeth. If there is an RPM signal and the POS counts are correct, this crankshaft sensor is good.

3. On the front of the engine, mounted on the oil pan is the crankshaft sensor (REF) reference. Check the AC voltage while cranking, should be a clean sine wave that indicates the Top Dead Center (TDC) position of each piston. White and Black wires in a 2 pin connector

4. Check the Camshaft (phase) sensor AC voltage output. This sensor should also be a clean sine wave. This sensor detects cylinder number. This sensor is located in the front cover facing the cam gear. White and Black wires in a 2 pin connector.

Nov 07, 2009 | 1995 Nissan Maxima

3 Answers

What does code p1391 mean when failing an emissions test


intermittent loss of crankshaft or camshaft position sensor.

Oct 14, 2009 | 1997 Dodge Ram 1500 Club Cab

1 Answer

I have a 96 mistubishi eclipse with 2.0 non turbo that has a code p1391 can anyone help me please?????????


Tests/Procedures: 1. Check the Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP) and Camshaft Position Sensor (CMP) signals with a lab scope.

2. Check the wiring and connections at the CKP and CMP sensor. Potential Causes: Camshaft Position Sensor (CMP)
Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP)
Powertrain Control Module (PCM)
Wiring

Aug 08, 2009 | Mitsubishi Eclipse Cars & Trucks

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