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Need timing marks and how to adjust dual cam gear marks after removing heads

Replaced heads after machine shop valve job. There are two (2) valve cam shafts for each head and are cam to cam driven by gears. I need to make sure the cams are in time, then replace valve covers on heads.

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 5,525 Answers

Register for free at autozone.com. List your make, model and so on, you know like so anyone knows what you got!
Repair guides specific to your car, it has timing diagrams and procedures.

Posted on Feb 04, 2014

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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isaid
  • 302 Answers

SOURCE: I took my old head to a machine shop to have it

thet can only be installed in one way

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/michael_00678fd4800d19c5

Posted on Oct 06, 2009

ZJLimited
  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: 1996 toyota camry 2.2 5s- too manny timing marks crank shaft,cam shaft and cam shaft gears

Hi there:I dont have this diagram for 2S-ELC, 3S-FE and 5S-FE Engines, but pay attention at this...
To install:

  1. Align the cutouts of the oil pump pulley and shaft, and slide the pulley on. Retain the pulley while tightening the nut to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm).
  2. Align the crankshaft timing pulley set key with the key groove of the crankshaft pulley, then slide the pulley on.
  3. Install the No. 2 idler pulley with the bolt and tighten to 31 ft. lbs. (42 Nm). Be sure the pulley moves smoothly.

Remove any oil or water on the idler pulley and keep it clean.

  1. Temporarily install the No. 1 idler pulley with the retaining bolt. Hint: use a 1.65 inch (42mm) bolt in length. Do not tighten the bolt yet. Install the tension spring. Pry the pulley toward the left as far as it will go, then tighten the bolt.
  2. Turn the crankshaft until the key groove in the crankshaft timing pulley is facing upward. Install the timing belt on the crankshaft timing, oil pump, No. 2 idler and water pump pulleys.

If the old timing belt is being reinstalled, make sure the directional arrow is facing in the original direction and that the belt and crankshaft gear matchmarks are properly aligned.

  1. Install the lower (No. 1) timing belt cover and new gasket with the four bolts.
  2. Align the crankshaft pulley set key with the pulley key groove. Install the pulley. Tighten the pulley bolt to 80 ft. lbs. (108 Nm).
  3. On 2S-ELC engines, turn the crankshaft pulley and align the 0 mark on the lower (No. 1) timing belt cover.
  4. Align the camshaft knock pin with the matchmarks on the oil seal retainer.
  5. On 2S-ELC/USA engines, align the knock pin with the pin hole on the timing pulley E mark side. On 2S-ELC/Canadian engines, align the knock pin with the pin hole on the timing pulley. On 3S-FE and 5S-FE engines, align the knock pin with the groove of the pulley, and slide the pulley onto the camshaft with the plate washer and set bolt.

On 2S-ELC engines, make sure that the Matchmark on the oil seal retainer and center hole of the small hole on the camshaft timing pulley are aligned.

  1. Using the removal tool to hold the pulley stationary, install and tighten the pulley set bolt to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm) on the 2S-ELC and the 3S-FE. On the 5S-FE, tighten the set bolt to 27 ft. lbs. (37 Nm).
  2. On 3S-FE and 5S-FE engines, turn the crankshaft pulley and align the 0 mark on the lower (No. 1) timing belt cover.
  3. Install the timing belt and check the valve timing as follows:
    1. Align the matchmarks that you made previously, and install the timing belt onto the camshaft pulley.
    2. Loosen the No. 1 idler pulley set bolt 1 / 2 turn.
    3. Turn the crankshaft pulley two complete revolutions TDC to TDC. ALWAYS turn the crankshaft CLOCKWISE. Check that the pulleys are still in alignment with the timing marks.
    4. Tighten the No. 1 idler pulley set bolt to 31 ft. lbs. (42 Nm).
    5. Make sure there is belt tension between the crankshaft and camshaft timing pulleys.

  4. Install the upper (No. 2) timing cover with a new gasket(s). On the 5S-FE, align the two clamps for the engine wiring harness with the cover mounting bolts.
  5. Install the spark plugs.
  6. Install the right mounting insulator with bracket. Tighten the bracket bolts to 38 ft. lbs. (52 Nm), insulator nuts to 38 ft. lbs. (52 Nm) and thru-bolt to 52 ft. lbs. (71 Nm). On the 5S-FE, install the No. 2 engine mount bracket and tighten to 38 ft. lbs. (52 Nm); install the control rod and tighten the bolts to 47 ft. lbs. (64 Nm).
  7. Lower the engine.
  8. On 3S-FE and 5S-FE engines, install the alternator and alternator bracket. On 2S-ELC engines, install the power steering reservoir tank.
  9. Install the drive belt and adjust the tension.
  10. Install the cruise control actuator with bracket.
  11. Install the fender apron seal and right engine under cover.
  12. Install the right front wheel.


Hope this helps.

Posted on Jun 12, 2012

robind92
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Trying to align the cam and time gears. We had to

1997 satrin timing mark;s

Posted on Oct 04, 2012

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2 Answers

Ok 1990 geo storm 1,6 litre dohc replaced water pump replaced 3 valves replaced head gaskets replaced timing belt car wont start any ideas?


90 Storm, must be in Canada, 1,6 (the comma tells me this)
the storm is a:
The car is really an Isuzu Impulse minus some of that car's more expensive features.
my guess is you drove the this 4EX1 engine until the cam belt slipped. yes> if yes you bent valves.????????????
so does compression exceed 150psi on all 4 cylinders now?
we use the cylinder leak down test in all DOHC .
if not , back to the drawing board.
if yes, the we check spark next, then try test fuel.
when did the engine last run , last week,month , year,?
who did your valves, a real machine shop or kid down the street.
a read shop pressure tests the head ,and warp checks it and
then makes sure the valves are ready for long service.
are the head bolts at 58 ft/lbs
did you use sealant on the 3 cap caps, per the FSM book.
if not , top end oiling will fail. and cams wrecked.

the 1.6l DOHC has no HLA's
the lash on valves must be checked, and this is corrected with SHIMS.

a pro machine shop does the for you,did they:?
when rebuilding engines, its best to read the factory service manual first. FSM so you know the special steps just for this engine.
ISUZU engine it is.



quote.
1.6L Twin Camshaft Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the cylinder head or valve cover.
  3. Position the No. 1 cylinder at TDC on its compression stroke.
The notch on the crankshaft pulley should align with the 0 degrees mark on the timing gear case. Make sure the rocker arms on the No. 1 cylinder are loose and the rockers on the No. 4 cylinder are tight. If not, turn the crankshaft one complete revolution and align the marks again.
  1. Using a feeler gauge, measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the selective shim on the intake and exhaust valves on the No. 1 cylinder, then the intake valves on the No. 2 cylinder and the exhaust valves on the No. 3 cylinder. Note readings.
  2. Rotate the crankshaft 360 degrees. Using a feeler gauge, measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the selective shim on the intake and exhaust valves on the No. 4 cylinder, then the intake valves on the No. 3 cylinder and the exhaust valves on the No. 2 cylinder. Note readings.
  3. The valve clearance obtained on the exhaust valves should be between 0.008-0.012 in. (0.20-0.30mm). If not, replace the selective shim by turning the camshaft lobe downward and installing tool J-38413-2 or J-38413-3 (valve lash spring spacer) between the camshaft journal and the cam lobe next to the selective shim. Turn cam lobe upward and remove the selective shim. Install new shim using the selective shim chart.
The rear camshaft bearing caps must be removed to remove the selective shim.
  1. The valve clearance obtained on the intake valves should be between 0.004-0.008 in. (0.10-0.20mm). If not, replace the selective shim by turning the camshaft lobe downward and installing tool J-38413-2 or J-38413-3 between the camshaft journal and the cam lobe next to the selective shim. Turn cam lobe upward and remove the selective shim. Install new shim using the selective shim chart.
  2. When the adjustment is completed, install the cylinder head covers and connect the battery negative cable. Start the engine and check for leaks.
end fsm quote.

see those 2 marks, and crank must be at TDC. mark first.

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May 16, 2016 | Geo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cam belt broke, need crank, pump, cam replacement and cam shaft timming too replace my cylinder head, also if possible please send diagrams


you need all of this but you failed to say what car you have????? good luck with that one lol that and if your cam belt broke and you have an interference engine youll need new valves and some machine work on the head too!!

Feb 10, 2018 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cam bearings


Remove the rocker cover to ascertain the damage done . It may not be bearings but seized valve in the head. To fix cam bearings properly it may necessitate the head removal and machining both the head surface and then the bearings should be line bored to realign the cam shaft correctly. Some Nissan products have the cam bearing housings adjustable with shims to align the holes correctly and if not done will break the cam shaft. IT may be the cam shaft is broken and jammed . What ever it will not be just a case of putting in new bearings until you have the head and bearing alignment checked out by an engineering shop.

Jan 06, 2014 | Nissan Pathfinder Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2004 Dodge NEON with an interference engine that the timing belt broke on. What are the chances of valve damage and about how much does that cost to fix?


The valves will be bent and you will need a head job done. The time to do the job outside head reconditioning would be around 4 hours labour and the parts will include valves, head gasket kit, timing belt, adjuster pulley, and if the job is done properly crankshaft and cam shaft seals as oil is the main cause of belt failure.

Apr 27, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cambelt broke on start up


If you broke a cam belt then you have serious damage in the head. the cam shaft holds several valves open at various stages of the cycle and they are hit by the pistons as the engine turns over resulting in bent valve stems. No easy cheap fix as the head has to come off to replace the valves.Best you find a qualified reliable mechanic to do the job and it will cost

Jan 11, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

How do you replace the head gasket


with great difficultry, It is verry time consuming end verry costly to have it (Replaced)

Nov 27, 2012 | 2000 Kia Sportage

1 Answer

How do I secure the camshaft gears on a 2002 outback 2.5l to remove and repalce?


if you have the head machined you will have to realine cams back tp proper marks and no if head is off and the cams turn some it will not damage the valves, usually this only happens if timing chain or belt is out and repeated try to start the engine...You should be fine and good luck and if more info is needed please feel free to contact me and remember as long as timing marks on cam are in proper alinement then your good to go..

Aug 18, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Blown head gasket


please read all before starting not to bad to change did you check compression if your sure that's what it is its about 4hr job.start by putting #1 tdc intake side.note where vacuum hoses are can mark with gray or yellow perm marker remove breather all plug wires exhaust manifold then intake manifold remember what bolts in and whats nutted on.remove break booster cross vacuum hose and egr control valve on left rear of intake side remove vale cover ((you'll have to get something to hold tension on timing chain so not to let tentioner come out inside timing chain cover when removing came gear)) remove head bolts only in off order so not to put tension in one area. do not remove cam shaft bolts and do not turn cam shaft at all after timing gear is removed take off head and check piston walls for wear replace gasket and put back in GOOD LUCK

Jun 30, 2010 | 1985 Nissan Pickup

2 Answers

When told your car needs a valve job, what does that mean


A valve job is removing the cylinder head(s) from the engine so the valves, guides and seats can be refurbished to restore compression and oil control. A valve job may be necessary by the time an engine has 80,000 or more miles on it, or to fix a "burned valve," compression or oil burning problem.
Before we describe all the steps that a typical valve job involves, we should warn you that some shops don't necessary do all the steps. In other words, you get what you pay for. A "cheapie" valve job might skip a lot of things that saves you a few dollars in the short run, but may end up costing you a lot more in the long run. So look for a shop or service facility that does quality work.
A valve job typically begins by disassembling, cleaning and inspecting the cylinder head. Cast iron heads are "Magnafluxed" to check for hairline cracks. This involves applying a strong magnetic field to the head and sprinkling iron powder on it. Cracks disrupt the magnetic field and attract the iron powder, making invisible cracks easy to see.
Cracks are bad news because they can leak coolant into the combustion chamber damaging the cylinders and/or causing the engine to lose coolant and overheat. If cracks are found in any critical areas of the head, the head must either be repaired or replaced. Cracks in cast iron heads are most often repaired by "pinning" (installing a series of overlapping threaded pins). Cracks in aluminum heads are very common and can often be repaired by welding.
If a head has been repaired (pinned or welded), most shops will usually pressure test the head afterward to make sure there are no leaks. Some may also apply a sealer compound to the inside of the water jackets as added insurance against future leaks.
Once the head passes this point, it is also checked for flatness. The surface of the head must be flat to seal the head gasket against the block. Excessive warpage, roughness or any damage can cause the head gasket to fail. If the head exceeds the maximum allowable out-of-flatness specs, it must be resurfaced or replaced. Usually there's enough metal in the head to allow for a certain amount of resurfacing. But on many import aluminum cylinder heads, the amount of resurfacing that's possible is minimal.
Overhead cam aluminum cylinder heads are often found to be warped (usually the result of overheating). If the condition cannot be corrected by resurfacing, the head can often be straightened by heating it in a special oven and then bending it until it is straight.
Next come the valves, guides and seats. The guides are checked for wear. They're almost always worn, so they either need to be replaced, relined or knurled (a process whereby grooves are cut into the inside diameter of the guides to decrease the bore size). Few shops knurl guides anymore. Most install new guides, guide liners or bore out the old guides to accept new valves with oversized stems. Aluminum heads have cast iron or bronze guides that can be replaced but most cast iron heads do not.
If the valves are to be reused, they will be inspected, checked for straightness then refaced. Many shops automatically replace all the exhaust valves to reduce the risk of failure (exhaust valves run much hotter than intakes and are much more likely to fail).
The seats in the head are either cut or ground to restore the sealing surface. If a seat is cracked or too badly worn to be refaced, the seat must be replaced. If that isn't possible (as is the case on many late model cast iron heads because the casting is too thin), then the entire head must be replaced. All aluminum heads have hardened steel seats that can be replaced.
The valve springs are all inspected and tested to make sure they are still capable of maintaining proper pressure. The spring retainers, keepers and other hardware is likewise inspected. Any worn or damaged components are replaced. New valve guide seals are always used.
The valves are then installed in the head and shimmed to restore proper valve height. This is necessary because machining the valves and seat alters their dimensions. Valve height is important because it affects valvetrain geometry and guide wear. If it is an overhead cam engine, the cam is also installed and the valve lash adjusted prior to returning the head to the customer

Sep 18, 2009 | 1992 Toyota Tercel

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