Question about 1997 Subaru Legacy

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1997 SUBARU LEGACY L OVERHEATING HAVE CHANGED OUT EVERYTHING BUT THE HEATER CORE. T-STAT,RADIATOR,WATER PUMP,HOSES ETC. I HAVE EVEN REPLACED THE HEAD GASKETS AND HAD NEW VALVES. STILL OVERHEATS. REPLACED T-STAT FOR THE THIRD TIME BECAUSE IT SEEMS AS THOUGH IT IS NOT GETTING FLOW. HOSE UP TOP HOT BOTTOM HOSE COLD AS IS THE RESERVIOR FLUID. ANY HELP WOULD BE MUCH APPRECIATED!!!

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  • Subaru Master
  • 62,972 Answers

Sounds like the system is airlocked . loosen t stat housing and start engine till water comes out there then tighten the housing

Posted on Sep 02, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: '97 subaru overheating

head gasket most likely.

Posted on Aug 31, 2008

SOURCE: 1990 subaru legacy

make sure you bleed the air out of the system on the top left hand side of the radiator or the car will overheat due to air lock

Posted on Nov 08, 2008

  • 17 Answers

SOURCE: Overheating 93 Subaru Legacy

water pump could be bad again. if the seal is out lets air in around pump propeller and it won't move water and it over heats. its a lot of work but you can fix it your self

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: 1990 subaru legacy

I hope this helps : A lot of people, even mechanics overlook the dramatic effects of "air lock" as described above. This is especially prominent in BMW's because they seem more "picky". Your cooling system (every cooling system) is balanced just well enough to nearly always keep your engine cool when operating properly. Sometimes a pocket of air does become trapped at one of the higher points ion the system however. This air pocket acts like a blanket trapping heat in the one dry area, in addition to impeding air flow. I would start WITH THE ENGINE COLD, by adding a radiator flush tee in to the heater hose leading to the intake. Start the car with the flush cap off, and the radiator cap. Play with the hoses and try to keep this tee higher than the fill cap on the radiator, to let out any air. When water is seen at the tee, cap it off and fill the radiator all the way, with the engine running, as to fill the entire block. Keep in mind that with the engine running, you kind of need to hurry. In only a few minutes, the water will get hot enough to start spewing from the open radiator (don't worry you have plenty of time, assuming it's all the way cooled down) I have seen many people leave their radiator half full, because it takes some time for the water to trickle all the way down through the runners on the radiator, and it looks full even though there is "air" (it's technically hydraulic pressure, like a siphon) holding it up. Hope fully that is the problem. You already re- did the whole system. Check your igniton timing too. Sometimes that can contribute to an overheat as well.

Posted on Dec 17, 2009

  • 17 Answers

SOURCE: 95 Subaru Legacy overheating, top rad hose is hot,

does your heater work? if not than your thermostat is stuck. be careful not to get the car hot as those engines are sensitive and will warp the cylinder heads quickly.

Posted on Apr 05, 2010

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1996 subaru legacy no heat, fan works great and thermostat replaced but still not heating up


heater core could be plugged, only way to check is to pull the heater hoses off and try to run water through it, if no water or little water then its plugged.. you would need to replace.

Feb 12, 2012 | 1997 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Need to know how to change a thermostat on a 1990 suburu legacy wagon over heated an lost all my antifreeze an broke a fan belt


Doesn't sound good. Usually t-stat is on engine. Follow top radiator hose to engine should be located there behind a 2 inch dome attached by two bolts and radiator hose is attached to the dome.

Now subaru's can't handle overheating. Slightly hot as in got to red but shut off imediatly, will often blow the head gaskets. Got hotter than that will crack the heads. as in drove more than 2 miles near red mark on guage. or by adding water while hot also will crack them.

Broken fan belt? was it timing belt and bad water pump? if water pump age is unknown will need one of those too. and most likely timing belt and some pulleys.

Good news is you can't hit the valves with a broken timing belt on these cars. But the timing marks are confusing there are 5 or so on the center gear but you only use the one on the back of the pulley on a tab that is a straight line. Point it up at the mark as book shows. the other two marks are ok. Putting in the belt tensioner is testy so good luck.

Best price for all these parts are on E-bay You can save hundreds by buy the sets.

NOW REMEMBER (CHECK YOUR HEADS FOR CRACKS OTHERWISE ALL IS LOST) TOO EXPENSIVE TO REPLACE USUALLY

Feb 17, 2011 | 1990 Subaru Legacy

3 Answers

Engine overheating


Hi and welcome to FixYa!

Few things to look at to resolve the overheating problem. Here are the following:

- Radiator is clogged
- Radiator fan blower is weak
- Water pump is worn out which may result failure on coolant cycle
- Cracked cylinder head

These must be replaced if found out faulty or damaged. Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa! Have a good one!

Feb 17, 2011 | 1999 Dodge Caravan

2 Answers

90 legacy, started overheating but was blowing cool air out of the heater even as the needle was pegged. Some fluid in reservoir, top radiator hose felt like it was under a lot of pressure.


Two things would cause this

There is a slow leak and the radiator is low on fluid

Let the vehicle cool down completely and then check the level in the radiator. I bet its pretty low. Top off the radiator with a 50/50 mix of coolant and water. start the vehicle and let it warm up with out the radiator cap on. Keep adding fluid as necessary. While waiting for it to warm up check around for any abvious coolant leaks. Things like hoses, radiator seams, water pump, water inlet/outlet gaskets. If no leaks are found it may be necessary to pressure test the cooling system and even then it might be a slow leak that only occurs when the vehicle is cold.

If the radiator is full than I would suspect that water pump is no longer working or creating enough flow. If the thermostat where stuck you would still get heat. If the water pump is not circulating coolant than you would get no heat and the car would overheat.

I’m happy to assist further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/jeremy_d728a59f986299fa

Nov 11, 2010 | 1990 Subaru Legacy

3 Answers

Overheating radiator without leakage


I posted this in a different web sight I hope it helps.


Re: Overheating and blowing cold air
I have been a mechanic for 20 years. Your problem is the heater core is plugged. The cold water from the radiator blows directly at the thermostat keeping it closed even when you are overheating! BAD DESIGN!! If you look at the water flow charts in AllData you will understand. If you rev the motor to 3,000 rpm's the turbulent HOT water at the water pump impeller (near the thermostat) will reach the thermostat to open it and the car's temp will fall very fast to the correct temperature. If you remove the thermostat it will not overheat but will run way to cold. If you bypass (loop) the heater core it will not over heat.

The hot water that leaves the heater core returns to the engine at the thermostat. It is the only hot water introduced to the thermostat to keep it open and allow the water to flow from and to the radiator. I normally just back wash the heater core and get large chunks of rust flake out then its fixed. Back wash then froward wash repeatedly many times. Also flush out the motor so you don't re plug the heater core. I hope you have now blown the head gaskets or cracked a head yet. Make sure to run the proper coolant in the car so you don't promote more rust flakes. And bleed the air out as mentioned in detail by other posters.

Nobody knows this little secret. Not even Subaru mechanics at the dealer, no TSB (Technical Service Bulletins a special note after the fact to mechanics). After days and days of trouble shooting a 1993 Subaru Impreza (2.0?) I looked at the water flow chart and then it was clear what was happening. This phantom overheating problem stumps the best mechanics and sends many Subarus to the crusher.

http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/...threadid=17264

Jan 16, 2010 | 1990 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

Heatere core replacement


Be careful you dont over heat soon. I posted this in a different web sight I hope it helps you.

Re: Overheating and blowing cold air
I have been a mechanic for 20 years. Your problem is the heater core is plugged. The cold water from the radiator blows directly at the thermostat keeping it closed even when you are overheating! BAD DESIGN!! If you look at the water flow charts in AllData you will understand. If you rev the motor to 3,000 rpm's the turbulent HOT water at the water pump impeller (near the thermostat) will reach the thermostat to open it and the car's temp will fall very fast to the correct temperature. If you remove the thermostat it will not overheat but will run way to cold. If you bypass (loop) the heater core it will not over heat.

The hot water that leaves the heater core returns to the engine at the thermostat. It is the only hot water introduced to the thermostat to keep it open and allow the water to flow from and to the radiator. I normally just back wash the heater core and get large chunks of rust flake out then its fixed. Back wash then froward wash repeatedly many times. Also flush out the motor so you don't re plug the heater core. I hope you have now blown the head gaskets or cracked a head yet. Make sure to run the proper coolant in the car so you don't promote more rust flakes. And bleed the air out as mentioned in detail by other posters.

Nobody knows this little secret. Not even Subaru mechanics at the dealer, no TSB (Technical Service Bulletins a special note after the fact to mechanics). After days and days of trouble shooting a 1993 Subaru Impreza (2.0?) I looked at the water flow chart and then it was clear what was happening. This phantom overheating problem stumps the best mechanics and sends many Subarus to the crusher.

Dec 11, 2009 | 1990 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

2002 subaru legacy


Im wondering are your fans strong enough to cool down that aluminum radiator.

Aug 15, 2009 | 1991 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

2002 subaru legacy heater not working


heater core could be plugged,try removing both heater hoses to core and back flush

Aug 15, 2009 | 2002 Subaru Legacy

2 Answers

90 Subaru Overheating


Are you sure you don't have a head gasket leak? Are you loosing water? I have not seen the previous post you had, but I believe the air plug you are refering to is the one on the radiator. It is used to complete the coolant bleeding.

Mar 18, 2009 | 1990 Subaru Legacy

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