Question about 1991 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

What is causeing my truck to backfire

My truck has been spiting a sputtering, I have changes the tps sensor, map sensor, cap, roto, wires, plugs, rebuilt carborator, and replaced vaccume lines, what could be causing my truck to not take off and die out and backfire all the time I have to constantly pump the gas peddle to keep it running.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 15 Answers

Hello,when you changed the cap and rotor did you have them check the timming,the timing chain may have jumped a clog,fuel pump may be getting weak,check you air filter make sure you pull it out in case mice filled up the space undernieth the element,check or change fuel filter,,may be a bad batch of gas may have some water in it,,good luck..

Posted on Feb 09, 2013

  • carlgorsuchj
    carlgorsuchj Feb 10, 2013

    I think it is my catalyst converter it is glowing red

×

Ad

5 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
csmock132
  • 4669 Answers

SOURCE: 87 chevy truck with TBI idles too fast

Spray the intake with carb cleaner to find the vacuum leak. Check where the EGR mounts and the throttle body gasket sense you had both off.

Posted on May 10, 2009

daves944
  • 1050 Answers

SOURCE: 95 Silverado backfires thruogh throttlebody

It sounds very likely that it is going lean. Could be a bad Mass airflow sensor or a fuel pump, maybe plugged injectors. The first thing to do if you can get your hands on one, is to put a scan tool on it that reads live data and go up a long steady hill while you are watching the O2 sensor voltage. It should toggle back and forth across .5V, if it remains below .5V while you drive, then you know it's not getting enough fuel. If so, check the fuel pressure to spec. If it is good, then the pump is fine and you're chasing the other two.

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: My 1993 chevy 1500 Silverado truck suddenly quits

1993 c1500 just stopped running in middle of street

Posted on Aug 19, 2010

bromech
  • 322 Answers

SOURCE: 1998 chevy k1500 vortec 305, high idle, surges a

TPS probably not cause surging idle. Could be IAC motor, could be MAF sensor. If you dont have a check engine light I would be thinking IAC motor.

Posted on Jan 21, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

3 Answers

1996blazer runs good, get up to 30-35 hesitates until let off gas and press again, when it hesitates black smoke and sputtering


It sounds like you might have a misfire that is causing the engine to run rich, hence the sputtering and black smoke. When is the last time that you replaced the spark plug wires and the spark plugs? If the 1996 plug wires are like the 1997 plug wires used on the 4.3L S-10, they can be pretty difficult to get a reliable connection at the distributor cap.

Jun 03, 2017 | 1996 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

Backfire, Black smoke from exhaust, spitting and sputtering


If you have not replaced plugs start there A bad map sensor will also cause black smoke and poor running

Feb 15, 2014 | Dodge Durango Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 98 dodge spits and sputters i have changed the fuel filter, the map sensor, the spark plugs and the egr valve


It is possible that you could have a bad spark plug wire, or a bad coil pack. Also it could be your TPS Throttle positioning sensor. Check spark on each wire to verify that you are infact getting spark the whole way across. If you are then I would suggest changing the TPS as it is inexpensive, if that does not help it could be your MAF, ( Mass Aif Flow Sensor) Hope that helps

Aug 05, 2011 | 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

IHAVE A 1991 JIMMY GMC I HAD TUNE IT UP PUT A NEW CAP AND ROTO PLUG AND WIRE AND CHANGE THE FUSE FILTER ALSO BUT IT KEEP CUP OFF WHEN I MAKE ACOMPLETE STOP AND WHE IAM RIDE WHAT COUL IT BE.


3 most common causes for your problem are:
  1. Bad EGR (Exhaust Gas Reciculation) valve - clogged EGR will cause engine to stutter or miss
  2. Bad MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor - will also make an engine stutter when bad
  3. Bad TPS (Throttle Postition Sensor) regulates idle speed under multiple conditions.

Mar 22, 2011 | GMC Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Code po105 pops up i had it reset and every 3-4 days it lights back up what does it mean ?


Generic code results from http://www.obd-codes.com/p0105 :

P0105 - MAP Circuit Malfunction

Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction

The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

FB.init("dd7d9e9681341cde77587bc6a2029f6f"); OBD-Codes.com on Facebook


Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:

  • Poor running engine
  • Engine runs rich
  • Engine won't idle
  • Engine backfires through tailpipe
  • Engine misfire under load or at idle
  • MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
  • In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

A P0105 DTC could be caused by:

  • MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
  • Bad MAP sensor
  • Bad TPS
  • Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
  • Damaged or problematic TPS connector
  • Damaged wiring
  • Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
  • Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
  • Bad PCM

Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

  1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
  2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

  1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
  2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
  3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

Feb 27, 2011 | Jaguar X-Type Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have this eobd code problem p0105 in my elantra, where those sensors?


P0105 - Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions:
Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:
1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


LOCATIONS:
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor: The MAP sensor is located against the firewall to the left side of the engine.
Barometric Pressure Sensor: This sensor is installed on the VAF sensor; Volume Air Flow Sensor Is located in the air intake plenum assembly.

Hope this helps.

Jan 24, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai Elantra

1 Answer

I have a p0105 error. They say this is a dirty body throttle. How can I clean this myself? My car is a 2002 Chevy Envoy.


DTC P0105 - Crankshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction or Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Malfunction


What does that mean?
The MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor is part of the fuel management system. It reacts to changes in engine manifold pressure. The PCM (Powertrain Control Module) monitors the MAP sensor continually to properly run the engine. Changes in engine load require changes in the amount of fuel injected, and timing of the ignition system, etc. An engine under load has more manifold pressure(or less vacuum) than an engine that is coasting. As the load changes, the MAP sensor voltage signal to the PCM changes accordingly. To check the MAP sensor operation, though, the PCM watches other sensors to verify that the MAP sensor is working properly.

For example, the PCM compares the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) signal to the MAP signal to verify the MAP signal isn't "sticking". If the PCM doesn't see a MAP sensor change immediately follow a change in the throttle pedal sensor, it knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor and sets P0105. Or, if the PCM notices that the TPS indicates the engine is under load, but the MAP signal indicates that the engine is "coasting" it, again, knows there is a problem with the MAP sensor or TPS and sets P0105.

Symptoms: Symptoms of a P0105 check engine light code may include:
* Poor running engine
* Engine runs rich
* Engine won't idle
* Engine backfires through tailpipe
* Engine misfire under load or at idle
* MIL (Malfunction Indicator Lamp) illumination
* In some extreme cases there may be no symptoms other than MIL illumination

Causes: A P0105 DTC could be caused by:
* MAP sensor vacuum hose disconnected or plugged
* Bad MAP sensor
* Bad TPS
* Damaged or problematic MAP sensor connector
* Damaged or problematic TPS connector
* Damaged wiring
* Short to reference voltage on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Loss of ground to MAP sensor or TPS
* Open on signal circuit of MAP sensor
* Bad PCM

Possible Solutions: Using a scanner or code reader, turn the ignition on and engine OFF; what does the MAP sensor voltage read? It should be about 4 Volts for sea level. If you are at a higher altitude, it should decrease about half a volt or so for each 1,000 ft. of altitude (this will vary from model to model) Or if you have a separate MAF (Mass air flow) sensor on your vehicle, they are usually equipped with a Barometric pressure reading. If so, the Baro reading should match the MAP reading (they both measure ambient air pressure). If they're roughly equal, then, check for Freeze Frame data of the MAP sensor (if available).

NOTE: Freeze Frame data is the PCM recording a fault when it happens. It captures the readings of the various PIDS (parameter identifiers)available to troubleshoot what happened. It's like a recording of the problem as it happened. At idle a typical MAP sensor Voltage reading should be about a volt, and at WOT (wide open throttle) it should approach 4.5 to 5 Volts. As for the TPS, at idle, the voltage reading is about 1 Volt or less. As the throttle is opened the reading will increase to 4.5 Volts at WOT. Do the two readings make sense? For example, if the TPS reading on Freeze Frame data shows 2.5 Volts (indicating partial throttle) does the MAP sensor indicate a reading that isn't at either extreme? Using the Freeze Frame data (if available) compare the MAP reading to the TPS when the problem occurred. This can help you identify what happened

If you have no access to Freeze Frame data then check if the MAP sensor voltage changes when you apply vacuum to it. You can do this by mouth or a vacuum pump. The voltage should increase as you apply vacuum. If the reading doesn't change as you apply vacuum, make sure there are no obstructions in the hose to the sensor. If the hose is clear, the MAP sensor is usually bad, but it doesn't rule out the following from causing the problem: Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at less than .5 Volts? Then:

NOTE: This code shouldn't set if the MAP is stuck at extremely low voltage, however, I'm adding it in because there's no way to know for certain for which vehicles a low voltage condition may set a P0105.

1. Inspect the wiring harness and MAP sensor connector. Repair any damage
2. Unplug the MAP sensor connector. Also, at the PCM connector, remove the MAP sensor signal wire and check for continuity to the MAP sensor connector. If there is infinite resistance, then repair open in MAP signal circuit. If the signal wire has continuity to the MAP sensor connector, then check for 5 volt reference voltage to the connector and a good ground. If both are present, then re-install all removed wiring and replace the MAP sensor.

Does the MAP sensor appear to be stuck at full 4.5 voltage? Then:

1. Inspect the wiring harness for damage. Repair as needed
2. Remove the MAP sensor signal wire from the PCM connector. With a voltmeter measure the voltage with KEY ON ENGINE OFF. Is there 4.5 Volts? If so, unplug the MAP sensor and recheck. If it is still present, then repair short between the signal wire and 5 volt reference wire.
3. If unplugging the MAP sensor causes the voltage to disappear, check that the ground is intact. If it is, then replace the MAP sensor due to internal short.

MAP sensor codes include P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 and P0109 .


Hope helps (remember rated this).

Jul 09, 2010 | 2002 GMC Envoy

1 Answer

I have a n 87 chevy suburban and it sputter when i start up and i replaced the iac the map and the tps but the distributor shaft is loose will that cause truck to sputter and idle irract and theres no...


The distributor shaft should not move from side to side. The tps has to be adjusted with a voltage meter to the correct settings. Plugs, wires, dist cap and rotor should be changed at the same time and this will eliminate any carbon tracking from wire to plug resulting in a misfire.

May 23, 2009 | 1989 Buick LeSabre

1 Answer

My 97 Chevy 1500 runs but it will sputter and shut off .


Check the distributor cap/wires/spark plugs. Also might be clogged injectrors (injector cleaner)
Hope that helps
Good Luck

Mar 18, 2009 | 1997 Chevrolet K1500

Not finding what you are looking for?
1991 Chevrolet S-10 Logo

136 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Chevrolet Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85161 Answers

Jonah Oneal

Level 3 Expert

14092 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22484 Answers

Are you a Chevrolet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...