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Bmw 318i oil leak

I have a bmw 318i 2002 plate , it is leaking oil badly , my mechanic has replaced the cam gasket and put a new filler cap on , but oil still seems to leaking from filler cap , he cannot see any VISIBLE leaks any where else , after a few miles smoke is coming from underneath bonnet , ( dripping onto hot engine i presume ) , so cannot have heater on otherwise car smells of burning oil , NICE !!! ,oil seems to dripping all day so may not just be filler cap , any suggestions what to do next to try to resolve problem , apart from selling car , thanks appreciate any advice .

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  • Contributor
  • 33 Answers

Make sure that the filler cap seal is in place and not gone hard over time also has the rocker cover been off at some stage if it has check that the gasket has not moved the other thing to look out for is that the PCV (breather )valve is in good working order if it is damaged the sump compression will rise and push oil out

Posted on Feb 08, 2013

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Mike258
  • 1498 Answers

SOURCE: white smoke at startup

Hi michelle,

Smoke signals:

  • White smoke = water vapor
  • Blue smoke = Oil
  • Black smoke = unburnt fuel
If it's only white smoke and it's only on start up (when its cool) its most likely condensation burning off from inside the exhaust pipes, manifold, muffler, etc. If water was in the cylinder(s), on the spark plugs there would be no smoke, exhaust or a running engine.

If oil was leaking into one or more cylinders the smoke would be blue.


There are things you can check for:
  • Is there any loss of power? Does it start and drive normally with no odd sounds or symptoms?
  • Check your coolant level daily (do it safely, never when hot, OK?). Is it dropping?
  • When you check the coolant, do you see any oil mixed in (floating on top)
  • Check your oil level. Is it dropping?
If you answered no to all of these, whats the problem?

As far as your friendly mechanic is concerned:
  • Has a compression test been performed? on each cylinder? What were the results? Get it in writing.
  • Better yet, take it to someone, anyone else for a second opinion. If you have a friend that tinkers with cars, have them perform the same test. see if they match.
  • If you need to bring it to another shop, don't tell them something is wrong. (I'm sure you understand why)
  • A good story is: you can no longer afford it, you are putting it up for sale and to avoid any complications you want to document the engine was recently checked out (specify you want a compression test to be performed as part of this). Since you are trying to get rid of the car, it's less likely a different 'Problem' will appear ;-), Get it? We want straight answers. See what they come up with.
I don't like to speak ill of someone I've never met, but from what you've posted, something smells fishy. You don't replace an engine because of a known blown head gasket. I'm not convinced yet that this is your problem. If it was, I'd be replacing the head gasket, not the engine.

It's unlikely anyone trying to sell you a $7,000.00 engine based on what you've described is looking out for interests other than their own.

Ask around, friends of friends, find someone trustyworthy. Get a second opinion, a third. It's a LOT cheaper than a new (yeah right) engine. Sorry about the sarcasm, but how would you know that it was new?

Please reply to me with a full list of symptoms, the results of your tests and any other details on whatever you may consider pertinent. This will help me help you.

But my most immediate advice is:
  1. Don't buy this engine
  2. If your car is in their shop, get it out, ASAP.
  3. Get a second impartial opinion.
These may be reputable mechanics, but every warning light in my head is screaming RIP OFF!! Don't let it happen!

I sincerely hope this helps you out.

Mike

Remember: Good things come to those who Rate!!

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: High oil Consumption, BMW M5

Look for Castrol TWS 10W60 Motor Oil. This car should not burn so much oil, you need to use a different kind. It is recommended by BMW as well. I also heard the VANOS isnt an issue anymore, can be fixed with a different MAFF. Good luck!

Posted on Jan 18, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Oil disappearing with no visible leaks and engine not using oil.

Check out this thread and take your Caddy for a couple of Wide Open Throttle runs on the Interstate. Clears out the carbon buildup on the rings that is causing oil blowby.

http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f1078f6/0

Posted on Jan 02, 2010

ZJLimited
  • 17970 Answers

SOURCE: Oil leak e36 318i BMW

From BMW 318/325/M3/525/535/M5 1989-1993 Repair Information

Timing Chain Cover REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

M30 Engine

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the cylinder head cover. Remove the distributor cap, rotor and rotor adapter.
  2. Drain the coolant to below the level of the thermostat and remove the thermostat housing cover.
  3. Remove the mounting bolts and note the lengths and positions of the bolts. Remove the upper timing case cover.
  4. Remove the fan, vibration damper and hub. Remove the water pump pulley. The power steering pump must be removed, leaving the pump hoses connected and supporting the pump out of the way but so the hoses are not stressed.
  5. Remove the piston which tensions the timing chain, working carefully because of very high spring pressure.
  6. Detach the tdc position sender.
  7. Loosen all the oil pan bolts, and then unscrew all the bolts from the lower timing case cover, noting their lengths for reinstallation in the same positions. Carefully, use a sharp bladed tool to separate the gasket at the base of the lower timing cover. Then, remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the condition of the oil pan gasket; replace if necessary. To install the lower cover, first coat the joints of the oil pan and block with sealer. Put it into position on the block, using new gaskets.
  2. Install the tensioning piston with the conical end of the spring against the plug. Install all bolts; then tighten the lower front cover bolts evenly; finally, tighten the oil pan bolts evenly. Torque the timing cover M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm). Tighten the oil pan M6 bolts to 6.5-8.0 ft. lbs. (9-11 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 13-15 ft. lbs. (18-22 Nm).
  3. To bleed the tensioner, fill the tensioner pocket where the piston contacts the tensioner rail with oil. Loosen the plug a few threads and move the tensioner rail back and forth until oil comes out of the plug threads and resistance is felt. Tighten the plug to 21-29 ft. lbs. (30-40 Nm).
  4. Inspect the hub of the vibration damper. If the hub is scored, install the radial seal so the sealing lip is in front of or to the rear of the scored area. Lubricate the seal with oil and install it with a sealer installer.
  5. Install the pulley/damper and torque the bolt to specifications. When installing, make sure the key and keyway are properly aligned. Install the tdc transmitter and its mounting bracket.
  6. Install the power steering pump and water pump pulley. Reinstall and tension all belts.
  7. Just before installing the upper timing case cover, check the condition of that area of the head gasket. It will usually be in good condition. If it should show damage, it must be replaced.
  8. Before installing the upper cover, use sealer to seal the joint between the back of the lower timing cover and block at the top. On some vehicles, there are sealer wells which are to be filled with sealer. If these are present, fill them carefully. Install new gaskets. Check the seal at the distributor drive and replace it, if necessary.
  9. Note that the top bolt on the driver's side and the bottom bolt on the passenger's side are longer. Tighten the 2 bolts that run down into the lower timing cover first to finger tight; torque the 6 bolts, then torque the bottom bolts. Torque the timing cover M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  10. Inspect the sealing O-rings and replace, as necessary. Make sure the bolt at the center of the rotor has its seal in place and torque to 16-17 ft. lbs. (22-24 Nm). Install the rotor and distributor cap.
  11. Install the cylinder head cover. Install the thermostat and housing with a new O-ring. Fill the cooling system with coolant and bleed.

M42 Engine
  1. Remove the ignition leads and valve cover. Remove the cam position sender on the upper cover. Drain the coolant and remove the thermostat housing. Remove the thermostat.
  2. Remove the 11 bolts holding the upper timing cover. Remove the cover carefully to avoid damaging the head gasket.
  3. Remove the radiator, fan, belts and water pump pulley. The water pump does not need to be removed to remove the lower cover.
  4. Remove the damper and the crankshaft hub.
  5. Remove the 21 bolts and remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the engine block dowel sleeves. Install new gaskets on the cover. Check the condition of the radial seals and replace if necessary.
  2. Install the cover and torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  3. Install the crankshaft hub and damper. Install the water pump pulley and belts. Install the fan and radiator.
  4. Place sealer at the head gasket to cover joints. Place the upper cover with new gaskets. Install 2 bolts and press the upper cover into place by wedging down against the camshaft sprocket. Torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  5. Install the valve cover and ignition leads. Install the thermostat and cover. Install the cam position sender. Fill the cooling system with coolant mixture and bleed.

M50 Engine
  1. Remove the ignition coils and valve cover. Drain the coolant and remove the thermostat housing. Remove the thermostat.
  2. Remove the 8 bolts holding the upper timing cover. Remove the cover carefully to avoid damaging the head gasket.
  3. Remove the radiator, fan, belts and water pump pulley. The water pump does not need to be removed to remove the lower cover.
  4. Remove the damper and the crankshaft hub.
  5. Remove the 13 bolts and remove the cover.
To install:
  1. Check the engine block dowel sleeves. Install new gaskets on the cover. Check the condition of the radial seals and replace if necessary.
  2. Install the cover and torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  3. Install the crankshaft hub and damper. Install the water pump pulley and belts. Install the fan and radiator.
  4. Place the upper cover with new gaskets. Torque the M6 bolts to 6-7 ft. lbs. (8-10 Nm) and the M8 bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-24 Nm).
  5. Install the valve cover and ignition coils. Install the thermostat and cover. Fill the cooling system with coolant mixture and bleed.


continue...

Posted on Aug 21, 2010

  • 4102 Answers

SOURCE: My Granddaughter has a 2003 Honda Civic which has

Hi, its not good news im afraid by you describing that with the coolant cap off and revving the car causes the pressure to build up and push the water back out it sounds to me like the head gasket is on its way out, what you need to do is take it to a garage and dont have a compression test done you need to have a gasses test done, you can buy these yourself if you want to and what it does is this.

its a plastic tube with blue liquid inside it then you take the coolant cap off and place this in its place you then run the engine and rev it up then you squeeze the rubber at the end of the tube and it then sucks the air out of the coolant and through this liquid then if it detects gasses from the engine in the coolant then this turns the liquid green and this is then telling you that the head gasket needs changing.

please dont let it keep over heating as this will cause the cylinder head to warp and you would then need to get it skimmed to make sure its not warped, get the gasses test done as a compression test dont give you a true reading as the engine is not running when they do a compression test.

let me know how you get on or if you need further assistance ok

plz rate this solution as i have a whole page of unrated posts, thanks

Posted on Sep 21, 2010

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